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Stopping eye strain

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by ArizonaMike, Jun 9, 2018.

  1. ArizonaMike

    ArizonaMike Mu-43 Top Veteran

    531
    Jan 19, 2018
    Arizona, USA
    This is the Open Discussion forum, so perhaps this is the right place for this post. If not, please let me know.

    I have begun to notice that my eyes get more and more tired when I work on a computer, and I suppose that this is related to having been working with computers and computer monitors for the past 35-40 years, most of that for 8-12 hours a day. The newer LCD monitors (I currently use a Dell 24" wide screen) seem even harder on my eyes than the older monitors and decreasing the brightness has not helped.

    I have read that there are special monitors designed to prevent eye strain and I have seen ads from companies like EIZO for blue light blocking for eye protection, but I have no idea if that provides any real help or if it is all "market speak", designed to sell hardware.

    Has anyone seen any devices that help with eye strain? Is blue light blocking real? And does it help? I have stayed away from high gloss monitors and use only matte screens, but that is not preventing me from getting blood shot eyes.
     
  2. Growltiger

    Growltiger Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 26, 2014
    UK
    Have your vision checked. Your eyes may be straining to keep focus at that distance.
    Another possibility is dry eyes. There are sprays like Actimist that can help. Or a humidifier.
    Take more breaks and use them to look into the distance.
    (Blocking blue light would make calibration impossible and photo editing unreliable.)
     
  3. wimg

    wimg Mu-43 Top Veteran

    520
    Dec 10, 2016
    Netherlands
    With age eye lenses become less flexible, which is why it becomes harder to focus nearby and far away. As Growltiger indicates, it is probably a good idea to have your vision checked, there might be a very simple solution.

    As to blue light blocking: that is really meant to be used in order to get to sleep more easily, it apparently mimics the end of day, or so they say. I do not know how much real research has gone into this aspect, to be very honest. Personally I do not find this a problem, but then YMMV.

    HTH, kind regards, Wim
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Growltiger

    Growltiger Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 26, 2014
    UK
    The blue light blocking is built into Windows 10, it is called Night Light. You don't need a special monitor.
    Go to:
    Settings/System/Display/Night Light (switch feature on, and adjust the settings.)
    Just remember not to do any photo editing while it is on.
     
  5. BosseBe

    BosseBe Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    941
    Aug 7, 2015
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Do you use reading glasses?
    Are they clean?
    I use reading glasses and have different strengths for different tasks, I find that I have to clean them often because it is so easy to get a smudge on a lens.
    I think the advice to have your eyes checked is good, I will put that on my own to do list.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 10, 2010
    Kiillarney, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    most of that will be fixed by a quick trip to the optometerist.

    Depending, try (as a first step) some of the +1 or -1 glasses you see in the shops (or supermarkets). I was using +1 for computer work back in 2009 as at "laptop distance" (keyboard and screen relationship) from me that made the difference.

    Usually at such small corrections actual "prescription" glasses are unrequired (just avoid crummy optics which are not even smooth) as its unlikely you'll need more astigmatism correction at the early stages.

    And yes, its a lifelong progression.
    How to prescribe spectacles for presbyopia

    some further reading:
    Presbyopia - EyeWiki

    Presbyopia is the irreversible loss of the accommodative ability of the eye that occurs due to aging. Accommodation refers to the ability of the eye to increase its refractive power of the crystalline lens in order to focus near objects on the retina.[1] The most significant decrease in accommodative power occurs in between the ages of 20 and 50. In the first two decades of life accommodative amplitude has been shown to be relatively stable in the range of 7-10 diopters. By the age of 50, accommodative amplitude has typically decreased to about 0.50 diopters.[2] This decline occurs as a natural result of aging and will ultimately affect any person reaching advanced enough age.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  7. piggsy

    piggsy Mu-43 All-Pro

    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  8. Your ambient light is probably insufficient if the room is that dark in comparison.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. piggsy

    piggsy Mu-43 All-Pro

    Google "bias lighting".
     
  10. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 10, 2010
    Kiillarney, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    Link just crashes here ... just sayin
     
  11. PakkyT

    PakkyT Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 20, 2015
    New England
    Worked for me. And we know you were just saying, we just read it. :coco:
     
  12. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 10, 2010
    Kiillarney, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    Well I was unable to. Were I bothered I'd start my PC up.
     
  13. ArizonaMike

    ArizonaMike Mu-43 Top Veteran

    531
    Jan 19, 2018
    Arizona, USA
    Thank you, all of you who replied to my post. Some comments:

    1) Yes, I already use glasses, and have since I was about 8 years old,

    2) Yes, I try to keep them clean all the time, sometimes more successfully than at other times, unfortunately,

    3) I already use special glasses for use on the computer as the distance of my computer screen is quite different from my normal reading distance,

    4) I already use a good quality monitor, although perhaps I need a larger one than 24 inches since I use it at a distance of about 60 inches from my eyes.

    5) Yes, I have seen both an optometrist and an ophthalmologist, and do so regularly. I am somewhat near-sighted but my distance vision is very close to what it was when I was in my teens, and that was quite a long time ago.

    6) I have a large screen 4K TV and have used that as a replacement monitor, and that has resulted in much less, if any, eye strain. I do not use it all the time because the color settings of the TV result in a too-saturated image when I edit photos. I need my normal computer monitor for that.

    7) Based on your responses the blue blocker screens will do nothing to help my eye strain, so thank you for that information. Has anyone ever used the EIZO monitors, which say that they are designed for lowered eye strain?
     
  14. PakkyT

    PakkyT Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 20, 2015
    New England
    As mentioned, many computer, phone, and tablet systems now feature a "blue blocking" less eye strain mode. Have you actually tried that yet (it is not in your list above other than an assumption that a special blue blocker screen won't work)?
     
  15. ArizonaMike

    ArizonaMike Mu-43 Top Veteran

    531
    Jan 19, 2018
    Arizona, USA
    Actually it was at the top of my list for something to try because I do get eye strain from my phone and the cost seems very low in comparison to those for monitors. However I was unable to find one for my particular phone (Samsung S7 Edge). I could find lots of screen protectors, but none that fit my phone and were blue blockers.

    Perhaps I need to try again.
     
  16. PakkyT

    PakkyT Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 20, 2015
    New England
    No I think you are misunderstanding. This is not a hardware fix, it is often build into the system software to simply adjust the output of the screen to cut back blue and make the screen have less eye strain, especially at night.

    In the case of your phone, if you go into settings and search for Blue Light Filter or something along those lines, you will find the setting. Should be under the "Display" group of settings. In fact if you use TWO fingers to pull down the notification bar you will get it to pull all the way open and somewhere in there you may see the blue light filter option. You can toggle it on or off to see the difference.
     
  17. ArizonaMike

    ArizonaMike Mu-43 Top Veteran

    531
    Jan 19, 2018
    Arizona, USA
    Yes. I did misunderstand. Thank you for the follow-up post.

    I did a search on my phone and found it using the Search functionality (and it was under Display), but when it showed up it was set to on. I can not be sure that that means it was always on, and perhaps the search set it to on, so I will see if this setting makes any difference. If it does, then perhaps I should do the same thing with my monitor.
     
  18. PakkyT

    PakkyT Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 20, 2015
    New England
    Ya you can tell when it is on or off by when you toggle it. When ON the screen will look a lot more yellow (less eye strain) and when OFF the screen will look very bright bluish (in contrast to the yellow you were just seeing). Often times Samsung preferences will show you what touching the setting WILL do rather than what it is current set. I have always found that confusing.
     
  19. Carbonman

    Carbonman Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Jul 10, 2014
    Vancouver BC
    Graham
    I went from a 21" monitor to a 32" monitor and found substantial eye relief. It also lets me easily put a floor plan or photo up on one half of the screen and the document I'm working on on the other half. My output has increased and it's a lot less stressful on my vision and work flow.
    Photo editing is easier too!:2thumbs:
     
  20. wimg

    wimg Mu-43 Top Veteran

    520
    Dec 10, 2016
    Netherlands
    Answers to some of your points :) .

    2) I used to have eagle eyes until my 32nd birthday or thereabouts (genetic defect which started playing up), and as a result I am almost overzealous when it comes to cleaning and the type of glasses I wear. First of all, I use glass rather than resin/plastic lenses. My experience is that they glass tends to be sharper and clearer. As to cleaning: I use very, very hot water to rinse the lenses, and wipe them dry with an often washed, soft cotton cloth, to get rid of the grease that inevitably finds its way onto the lenses. I probably do that once or twice a day, unless I am doing a lot of DIY, which often means I have to rinse dust off as well.

    Once every week or fortnight, I use a simple dishwasher soap, with no additives, to clean the lenses. Essentially, rinse first, apply a drop of dishwasher liquid on each lens, carefully rub between index finger and thumb the liquid on both sides of the lens, both lenses, until it foams well, then rinse again with hot water, and dry with the same cotton cloth.

    This works for me.

    3) I know it is time for new glasses when I can't read that well anymore, like not being able to distinguish easily between an "m" and an "n" - I am astigmatic, and my eye defect makes my eyes change all the time :) . I use 2 24 inch screens next to each other, at a distance on about 30 inches. 60 inches sounds like quite a lot.

    6) Size makes quite a difference, especially when viewed from a larger distance, see 3).

    7) AFAIK, blue blockers are really only for being able to get to sleep ,ore easily, as blue light tends to keep us awake. Some light emitting alarms make use of this, by using more orang light when the alarm goes off, and which slowly transforms to more blue light. It is also the reason why cell phones these days have the option to diminish blue light (blue blocker) at night.

    EIZO monitors are amongst the best there are for photo- and video-work, from a colour gamut and calibration POV. Only very few other monitors can keep up with them. They come at a price, however.

    HTH, kind regards, Wim
     
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