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Still Camera is Coming to an End

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by OzRay, Feb 25, 2015.

  1. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    • Like Like x 1
  2. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    Much of America doesn't have the bandwidth to quickly and easily share lots of video. I know for some reason we are very backwards when it comes to fast internet compared to much of the world, which sucks. Given the popularity of image sharing in social media (I for one don't understand how or why the trends are towards less users sending information via social networking - i.e. Twitter - and more users just sharing imagery, through Snapchat, Flickr, etc. etc.) I feel like the still image is still paramount in folks' minds, even if it's just a smartphone snapping the picture. The logical step for people wanting a better camera will still be a stills camera.
     
  3. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    It's funny that you should say that, as many people keep saying that Australia is the most backward country when it comes to internet speeds and access. I don't know of anyone who can't get reasonable speeds, but of course most of those aren't into pirating every movie/TV series they can lay their hands on.
     
  4. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    I guess it's true. But why should anyone here care? We clearly have different standards than the majority of smartphone photographers, which probably explains why we're on here talking about it in the first place.

    Let's be totally honest - if it weren't for our G.A.S, would any of us really care if Olympus and Panasonic and Sony and Fuji totally stopped making digital cameras and lenses tomorrow? Is there anything that is really missing from the tools that we already have? Anything preventing us from using what we have to make fantastic images?

    For me, the answer is no. And despite hyperbolic articles like that one, it's easy to see that no smartphone is currently able to replace an interchangeable lens camera. Most of the shots I really, really like and am proud of simply wouldn't be capable without the flexible focal lengths that are available on a large sensor (to say nothing of the ISO performance, dynamic range, and resolution, of course).

    I still wish I had a better smartphone camera because I don't have my M4/3 cameras everywhere I go. But at this point, I'm so disappointed with the quality of smartphone cameras whenever I compare them to my M4/3s that I don't even bother with mine except for basic documentarian photos. Which, I guess is the only thing that the smartphone users in the article actually care about.

    If Microsoft even decides to make a sequel to the Lumia 1020, I'll probably get one of those. But until that day, I don't see myself using my smartphone replacing anything photographic in my life.
     
  5. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    We're in this ridiculous dead zone where the providers are so few and so gluttonous that they don't really offer competitive products, because everyone knows you can't get anything better even if you wanted to. Google Fiber is an exciting proposition, but it's rolling out very slowly. My wife and I just use 30GB worth of LTE data a month from our cell provider, which we got at a discount but is still very expensive. We live in a rural area so the major internet providers are spotty and hard to get.
     
  6. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    The issue of connectivity is a vexing one for many, but on the subject of mobile phone cameras taking over from the DSLR, I think the article has some merit. More and more people never experience any other camera but that in a mobile phone, so a DSLR will be completely alien to them (in an ownership sense). That's why I think that mirrorless cameras potentially have a better future, as for those who have been brought up on phone cameras wishing to take better photos, may well not want the size and weight involved with traditional DSLRs, but moving up to a mirrorless camera may not be such a burden.
     
  7. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    Anyway, someone let me know when there's a 35-100mm f2.8 lens on an iPhone with a sensor that's good up to ISO 3200...

    This one happened to be out of a 30-year old Canon 50-135/3.5 with a cheap focal reducer...

    16295106101_bbbd698051_b.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  8. T N Args

    T N Args Agent Photocateur

    Dec 3, 2013
    Adelaide, Australia
    call me Arg
    The article is laughably misinformed. Won't waste time on it.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  9. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    I think the points that that the author is raising are worth discussing. It's clear that the iPhone, for example, is going up the ranks as the most popular digital camera on the planet; recent data indicates this is the case. And with ever improving phone cameras, and the fact that just about everyone has a mobile phone, this is only going to increase.

    It's also clear that DSLR etc sales are tanking. It's also clear that professional photography is tanking ie newspapers dumping pros etc. It's also clear that people are more than happy with the results from phone cameras. So where lies the future and whose future is likely to be the most sustainable in this changing world?
     
  10. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    What the article hints towards but does not really get into is where the camera companies really made their money, point and shoot cameras. They have taken a huge financial setback from most of your typical point and shoot buyers just going with the cellphone camera. For years the P&S market has help support the pro line of cameras and lenses.
     
  11. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    Would you rather use a dedicated device vs. a portable lightweight, you-have-it-with-you-anyway device? The latter will always win out.

    But cameras will always be around.
    Maybe for pros. Certainly sports pros
    Anyone who needs telephoto
    shallow DOF (sw still is poor at this)

    But even ignoring the above, there will still be people who like to use cameras. Who like the controls of a camera. They might be niche, but they will still be around.

    I'm sure "coming to an end" is click-bait (worked on me!). The number of camera options have to shrink, but they won't go away entirely.

    If people still buy tube-based devices to listen to giant vinyl disks in a stationary location, they will still buy cameras.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. T N Args

    T N Args Agent Photocateur

    Dec 3, 2013
    Adelaide, Australia
    call me Arg
    Yes but we have all been discussing that here for at least a year. Blogger thinks he is a great philosopher-prophet, plus click-bait as WT21 said, so not wasting my time on him. We know the issue much better than he.
     
  13. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    I don't think 'traditional' cameras will come to an end, but it's what those traditional cameras will look like that will be interesting. For example, newspapers are happy to post readers photos, regardless of the quality, as the photos are often more timely than were a journalist with a camera (note: not a staff photographer) get to the scene.

    The article raises something that I've been thinking about for some time. In the same way that tablets haven't usurped laptops/desktops, they have disrupted the traditional systems significantly. And while tablet sales have slowed and laptop/desktop sales have slightly improved, it seems that laptops are the winners here, with more people opting for the smaller form factor, but bigger than a tablet.

    I wonder whether something similar will happen in the camera world, where mirrorless cameras will become more favoured as a supplement to the camera phone, rather than large DSLRs.
     
  14. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    We do?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. sgreszcz

    sgreszcz Mu-43 Veteran

    439
    Oct 7, 2012
    Sorry, but I disagree. He has valid points, despite what we as photography enthusiasts might think or wish for. Mr. Laforet is a long time established photojournalist and (now) videographer not a fly-by-night blogger.
     
  16. dornblaser

    dornblaser Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 13, 2012
    Chicago-area
    David Dornblaser
    This reminds me a lot of the death of landline phone predictions from about 10 years ago, death of the fax machine from the same era, the post-PC predictions, etc. Just because smartphone use and video has exploded does not necessarily mean the end to still cameras.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2015
  17. sgreszcz

    sgreszcz Mu-43 Veteran

    439
    Oct 7, 2012
    Yes, but that all is niche and how many of the original tube-based or vinal device making companies are still in business or if so maki gas much $ as at their peak.

    As the market gets more dominated by mobile phone photography is there enough market to support canon, Nikon, Fuji, Panasonic, Olympus, Sony, samsung, sigma, etc.
     
  18. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    I don't think anyone is denying that smartphone photography is taking over in a real way. That's not news, and hasn't been for...years now. The question is, what is the consequence of that? There are no fresh insights there in that post, and I don't think he is any better equipped to answer it than any of us.

    For thoughtful industry analysis, I much prefer Thom Hogan. bythom.com is always a good read, and he tends to be a lot more measured, while reporting much the same kind of thing.
     
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    • Agree Agree x 1
  19. sgreszcz

    sgreszcz Mu-43 Veteran

    439
    Oct 7, 2012
    I disagree. Many people (at least in Europe where I live) don't have landlines unless they are forced into it for a broadband connection. Many dont use a computer/laptop but tablets and smartphones. I can't remember the last time I used a fax machine.

    I you read the article there are many valid points.

    Too bad the headline is a bit too sensational.
     
  20. sgreszcz

    sgreszcz Mu-43 Veteran

    439
    Oct 7, 2012
    I think that he is looking at it not just from a hardware/technology viewpoint killing the point and shoot, but that (and applications) starting to eat into the higher end cameras too.

    Andrew at eoshd touches on that too.

    Yes, this isn't news but it seems to be progressing up the chain as camera phones replace point and shoot, mirrorless replace dslr, etc.

    Mirrorless might be a sweet spot due to size/quality/lens selection tradeoff and the innovation (connectivity, functionality) being out in those cameras vs. dslr.