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sRGB vs Adobe RGB Monitor (also, any MBP users please chime in)

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by ijm5012, May 8, 2016.

  1. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    I'm looking to pick up an external monitor for my laptop (late 2013 rMBP), primarily for photo editing. Initially I was going to pick up a 4K monitor, because it's the way of the future regarding displays, and I figure why not future-proof my investment. But upon doing some research, I sadly found out that my laptop can't drive a 4K display at 60hz, only at 30hz, which makes it practically useless.

    So I then turned my attention to 1440p displays, and am looking at the Dell U2515H and UP2516D. From everything I've read, the U2515H is a great monitor, with 99% sRGB coverage. But the UP2516D is 100% coverage for sRGB and Adobe RGB. I can get the UP2516D for about $100 more than the U2515H, but I'm wondering if it's worth the extra cost?

    Now I know, people will ask "well do you work in Adobe RGB?". From what I've read, sRGB is better for web, and Adobe RGB is better for print. I do print my images, but the site I've used up to this point for printing says to send the files to them in the sRGB color space. Now that's not to say that I won't change printing companies in the future, and that they will want a file in Adobe RGB instead of sRGB.


    So, I'm curious as to what people have to say on this. Is it better to pay more to get the wider color gamut display, or should I save the money and stick with the sRGB monitor?


    As for any MBP users, if I were to get the 4K monitor, could I have it display as a 1440p panel and run it at 60hz? The reason I ask is because it would allow me to get the best of both worlds: I could run the panel as a 1440p display @ 60hz with my current rMBP, but then run it as a 4K display @ 60hz in the future with a computer that could drive it at that refresh rate.
     
  2. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    The monitor just has to be able to accept lower resolutions and most do. The computer itself doesn't really care what's on the other end. If you check page 11 on this user guide for Dell 4K monitors, you can see it will scale all the way down to an ugly 800x600 with stops at 1920x1080 and 2560x1440: http://static.bhphotovideo.com/lit_files/104995.pdf

    The only thing that worries me is that Apple says that the HDMI port only supports 1920x1200 at 60hz, Although I know some reportedly run 1440p.

    Also, don't be so quick to dismiss 30hz for a monitor. It's not as bad as you would think unless you are working with high speed video or games. It would be a nice option for viewing photos or watching 24/30fps 4k video from a Panasonic cam, even if you don't run it like that all the time.
     
  3. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    There are tons of discussion on pros and cons of wide gamut monitors. As long as your OS and applications are color managed, I would err on the side of a wider gamut monitor, even if only for future proofing.
     
  4. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    Yeah, I was aware that the monitor could adjust its output to something less than its true resolution, I just wasn't sure if it could be driven at 60hz.

    As for 30hz vs 60hz, it just doesn't look as good when scrolling or moving the mouse. But as you said, it may work well as a 1440p monitor for general use, and then switch it to 4K when viewing video shot with my GH4 or RX100M4.
     
  5. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    Working with a wide gamut monitor has its pros and cons. It would be helpful if the monitor easily allowed you to work in sRGB when needed, and that is easier with some monitors than others. What is not ideal, IMHO, is working in a wide gamut space when you know that you are heading to sRGB for final output, and switching the color space is not easy or hassle-free. And, I would sooner take a high quality evenly lit quality sRGB panel before I opted for a budget wide gamut panel, but again, that is a personal choice.

    --Ken
     
  6. John M Flores

    John M Flores Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 7, 2011
    Somerville, NJ
    Is there such a thing as a "budget wide gamut panel"? They are typically 100-200% more than similar size/resolution sRGB panels.
     
  7. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 10, 2010
    Southport, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    well ... if using the word budget in the context of "NASA as a budget" ... for sure ;-)
     
  8. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    Dell used to have some wide gamut panels that were quite a bit less expensive than what was being offered from the likes of NEC and Eizo. That is not to say that the Dell panel is bad, but you sometimes see less even lighting and more bleeding at that price point.

    --Ken
     
  9. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    Dell's 1440p sRGB monitor is ~$350, and their 1440p wide-gamut monitor is ~$500, so it's only 43% more expensive.

    I do agree with @Replytoken@Replytoken though about ease of switching between sRGB and other color profiles. If working with an image I know I'll print, I'd like work in Adobe RGB, and if working with stuff for web-only I would work in sRGB.
     
  10. JonVdG

    JonVdG Mu-43 Regular

    25
    Feb 2, 2016
    Colorado, USA
    Jon
    A word of caution regarding Dell monitors and Apple computers - they don't always play nice together. Your mileage may vary of course, but this is a well known problem (my 2-year old Dell is flaking out with my 2014 Mac Mini right now as I'm typing this). With regard to sRGB versus Adobe, I stay focused on P3 and sRGB. In my opinion, Adobe hasn't been relevant in terms of color space for anything other than four-color commercial (CMYK offset) printing for awhile. I realize there are photographers and printmakers who will disagree with that statement, but I made it a point to let go of Adobe RGB, and everything else Adobe, several years ago and I couldn't be happier. I keep my recent iMac set to default (which is P3), my cameras set to sRGB, and print directly from RAW to an Epson P600 (or to 8-bit TIFF on the Light Jet). The key, as was mentioned earlier, is to keep everything as well calibrated as possible. On occasion, I switch to Adobe RGB just to test the waters, but I always seem to create more work for myself without any noticeable benefit.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2016
  11. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    I placed an order for a Dell UP2516D wide-gamut 1440p monitor from B&H. I've read multiple reviews, and MBP users reported no issues when using the supplied cable. I paid $470 for it (no tax or shipping), which is only $120 more than the sRGB equivalent monitor from Dell, the U2515H.

    In the end, I thought it was worth the additional cost for any future print work I may do with labs who use Adobe RGB. Everything I've done up to this point has been in sRGB, but it's nice to have the option to print in Adobe RGB when a print lab offers it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2016
  12. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    I got my Dell UP2516D today, and I am very pleased with it. The 1440p resolution is fantastic, and I'm glad I went with a wide-gamut panel. I pulled up an image I shot this past weekend in LR and was bouncing back and forth between Adobe RGB and sRGB, and the difference was instantly noticeable. For an extra $120, it was a no-brainer now that I have it.

    I will say that the included DP to miniDP cable included was a bit flaky with my 13" rMBP. Sometime it would work, sometimes it wouldn't. Fortunately, I just grabbed a spare HDMI cable, hooked it up, and now I don't have any issues.

    This is a very good display IMO. A 25", 100% Adobe RGB & sRGB, 1440p display for under $500 is hard to beat, and this one doesn't disappoint.
     
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  13. johnvanatta

    johnvanatta Mu-43 Regular

    181
    Aug 5, 2014
    Oakland, CA
    People tend to talk about wide gamut vs sRGB from a professional production standpoint, which is fine if that's your use case, but it misses the amazingness of beautiful colors for your own enjoyment. sRGB displays just look muted and bland to me after years of wide gamut, and I can't really consider going back.

    That being said, high-DPI is awesome too, and high-DPI+wide gamut is limited (and fairly expensive) right now.

    I don't have personal experience with 30Hz but I've heard that based on how LCDs work it can be acceptable, unlike say 60Hz in the CRT days.
     
  14. Orionwest

    Orionwest New to Mu-43

    6
    Dec 3, 2015
    Just read this not so old thread and wanted to add my take. I've been using an NEC P221W wide gamut monitor and also have a Samsung srgb monitor beside it. This makes working in both the Adobe and SRGB color spaces very easy. I'm about to buy a 4k wide gamut monitor because my e-m mkii can do 4k time lapse and also for the future as 4k will become the norm. I would recommend a wide gamut monitor to anyone who can afford one and they have come way down in price. Ever since using one it usually takes one try to get a print that closely matches the image on the screen when working in the Adobe RGB color space.
     
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  15. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    If you calibrate your monitor to your printer then it should only take one try.
     
  16. Orionwest

    Orionwest New to Mu-43

    6
    Dec 3, 2015
    Theoretically it should but it didn't. I assume most people on this site shoot in RAW and if that is the case then a wide gamut monitor is the only way to go otherwise just set the camera to srgb and shoot jpegs because an srgb monitor will never be able to show the color content of a RAW file.
     
  17. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    Color depth and space is not the only reason the shoot RAW...
     
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