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Featured Spain – a Pen-F & Olympus 17mm f/1.8 go traveling together

Discussion in 'Scenic, Architecture, and Travel' started by Hendrik, Nov 3, 2018.

  1. Hendrik

    Hendrik Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    825
    Feb 27, 2015
    Wayland MA
    Images appear in subsequent posts:
    Family Time and the Lie of the Land
    Town Scenes (Capileira)
    My Wife and I Take a Walk
    We Walk to Bubión
    Introduction to the Alhambra
    Nasrid Interiors
    Water Features
    Nasrid Ceilings
    Coda: The Generalife, etc.

    But first, by way of introduction, a trip post mortem

    2002
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    My previous visit to Spain was in 2002. That was the last foreign travel adventure I shot on film (color negative stock largely procured en route). I can only recall using a single OM-2 and Zuiko 50 f/1.4. I suspect I may occasionally have used a Zuiko 75-150 f/4 or, even less likely, a Zuiko 28 f/3.5. My wife toted a film P&S and my son was carrying a Canon Rebel film camera that was about half the weight of my OM-2. By this time, my wife and I had already started using an Olympus 3030Z digicam, but it stayed home. Digital cameras and cards were expensively iffy affairs then – 3MB images and 256 MB cards were pushing it! Scanned 35mm snapshots seem most satisfactory to me when scaled to 5-6Mp. So, I had a list of images I wanted to reshoot.

    2018

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    Earlier this year (2018), knowing I would be going back to Spain and Turkey, and wishing to carry an everyday combo optimized for light weight and inconspicuousness, I picked my (separate) times and bought refurbished copies of both a Pen-F and an O17/1.8. On this trip I also carried an E-M5.2 (same battery as Pen-F, better ergonomics for the 40-150 Pro, weather resistant) as backup/second body for the odd occasion. Even though I carried a rather full roster of lenses, I could have saved my back the trouble – the new kids on the block did most of the work.

    I had come to trust the Pen-F on its first trip (to Washington, D.C.). As a combo with the 12-40 Pro or a fastish prime, I ascertained it could do just about anything I might want a travel camera to do: landscape, street, mood, family, restaurants, museums, etc. Consequently, other than the possibility of torrential rain – we never saw more than a couple of drops of drizzle on either trip – I had no worries about the body.

    I added the O17 to the herd after that. How did it do on the trip? It did just fine. I struggled a bit. Among other things, I tell myself, this is just not how I see. I have a P20/1.7 vI, but never bonded and it has no place in my bag. Widening to 17 mm should have made things worse, if anything, but the O17 immediately struck me as an immense step up in usability. And why not? As it turns out, when using the 12-40, 17mm (~8%) is my most visited focal length after 12mm (~15%) and 40mm (~38%). There is a significant usage peak of ~16% between 15mm and 19mm. Still, that 8% (or 16%) usage was the source of my struggle. There were more than a few instances where I would have liked to mount a longer or a wider lens but I didn’t – I was lazy and now wish I hadn’t been. I mostly needed to keep moving. Changing lenses would have made those parts of the visit too rushed and there was already too little time. So I temporized with some panos, even in interiors. Of those, there were some happy successes and some, shall we say, learning experiences.

    The Pen-F mainly saw two lenses – the O17 and the 12-40 Pro. Of these, the bulk of the Pen-F images were shot with the O17 (>800 vs. <100). This was a bit of a lark for me. I have become a habitual zoom shooter and the 12-40 has easily nailed down its place as the first lens listed when I decide who comes with and who doesn't. I seldom leave home without it. A contributing factor was my decision to mount a Peak Design Capture 3 clip to my belt. This served as encouragement to keep the Pen-F/lens combo as light as possible. Besides, with the camera hung lens-down from the matching low profile plate, the 12-40 is incompatible with the clip - so, no go.

    The E-M5.2 only saw two lenses – the 40-150 Pro and the 40-150 Pro + MC-14. Thinking back to the usefulness of an O9-18 I had rented for a prior visit to Turkey, I also carried a 7-14 Pro but it only left the bag for three exposures, none in Turkey.

    I might have used a greater variety of lenses on another, less focussed and more relaxed trip. We were in Spain for less than four full days. Though we were in Turkey nearly twice that long, I had even less time available for photography by virtue of being the father of the groom and thus actively discouraged from toting a camera at family events, of which there was a liberal supply (the Turks easily surpass Yanks such as myself in family-centricity). I'm not accustomed to being only fodder for photos. Even though I had my iPhone, I still felt naked. Had I felt free to use a camera, I would certainly have mounted a longer prime at those.

    Only when writing up this memo did I come to realize the extent to which this past photographic experience mimicked so very neatly that of my first trip to Spain. It shouldn’t have been surprising to find that it is perfectly possible to come back from a family trip with a mess of meaningful, even good, photos using the equivalent of a wildly overspecced smartphone. No matter, you can color me surprised. Sure, I shot primes in film days. That was then. Even though it’s not my current style, and, while I’m certain that, of social necessity, I left a bunch of neat images on the table, I do appreciate the more relaxed nature of the experience that resulted from the simpler approach. Besides, I do like a good puzzle.

    Please, folks, don't take any of this as whining. I have no regrets. Quite the contrary – I had a blast! Across the board it was an incredible opportunity for personal growth – I'd do it again in an instant. This thread is just a way for me to think about the body and lens list I will make for the next trip.

    So, to return to the lens and body mentioned in the title – have they pledged their vows? Well, it’s complicated. Let’s agree to call it an open marriage…

    OK, that’s enough preamble. On with the show.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2019
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  2. Hendrik

    Hendrik Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    825
    Feb 27, 2015
    Wayland MA
    Post #2 – Family time and the lie of the land


    On both occasions, our main purpose in going to Spain was to visit my youngest sister – who is ten years my senior.

    2002
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    2018
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    I continually have to remind myself that my sisters, who are my only sibs, and have been fixtures in my life from my day one, are not forever.

    How lovely that she and her artist husband, Cristobal (as he styles himself for branding purposes) live in an out-of-the-way, magnificent photo-op...

    Chris sharing an iPhone moment with my wife
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    the village of Capileira.

    “One of the most beautiful villages in Spain”
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    View from the road to town
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    High (~1450m) in the Alpujarras region of the Sierra Nevada, it is one of the white towns to which the Moors retreated after the loss of Granada. The longest view is generally south, down the gorge of the river Poqueira. The major feature of the view, about 13 miles distant, is the Sierra de Lujar. On the clearest days, it is said, one can look past Lujar and see the Mediterranean, about 18 miles away. We seem not to have been there on one of those days. Either that or we didn’t know what to look for.

    At least when we visited around the summer solstice (on both occasions) and thanks to the high walls of the gorge, sunrise and sunset are somewhat theoretical events here. There is no direct lighting of the immediate area involving the most colorful golden-hour light.

    Dawn leaves the gorge in shadow
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    That is not to say there is no dramatic lighting available at other times.

    Early morning light hits Bubión
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    Bubión’s church in first direct light
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    Evening view down the gorge from our lodgings
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    Looking down the gorge, the village just down the mountain from Capileira is Bubión, about a mile away (just out of the sunlight, above). Visible further down is Pampaneira (in deeper shadow, close to the center of the image, above). The road ascends in a switchback from Pampaneira on the eastern face of the gorge (camera left).

    The west face (camera right) has been terraced and still would appear to be used for occasional pasturage. There is no easy vehicular access. It may provide summer shelter for some inhabitants but seems otherwise abandoned.

    West face of the gorge nearly fully lit: Morning
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    Each morning we were delighted to rise to the sound of distant goat bells. This was just as we remembered it from our earlier visit. It has a timeless feel to it but we were told that there are fewer herders keeping flocks than when my sister first arrived, nearly forty years ago. My brother-in-law has taken documenting the apparently not-so-very timeless and quickly passing ways of life here as his personal project.

    Weather Report: early morning goats, at least today, perhaps tomorrow
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    Last edited: Nov 17, 2018
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  3. Hendrik

    Hendrik Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    825
    Feb 27, 2015
    Wayland MA
    Post 3 – Town Scenes

    When my wife and I arrived in Capileira at the end of June, vacation was just starting and seasonal residents were starting to return (in summer the population at least doubles). Ironically, and through no forethought on our part, we managed to time our visit during the few days just after the end of the school term when half the town’s shopkeepers go to the seaside with their newly sprung kids. This served to make the atmosphere unnaturally peaceful and services untypically short. Even so, we managed to eat whenever we felt we needed to, so, no harm.

    Capileira is a quaint, mildly touristy village, one of the white towns. It is the last town one encounters before the road enters the National Park. It serves as a base for vacationers hiking in the Sierra Nevada toward Mulhacén, the highest peak in Spain.

    Plastic hams on display – the real ones (on sale inside) are produced nearby in the area around Trevélez
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    One of the shops featuring tourist paraphernalia of mostly Moroccan manufacture – these folk didn’t go to the beach
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    Capileira is largely a walking town – one even walks the main road; normal traffic is a car every few minutes, or so

    You’ll hear it coming well before you see it
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    The passages within the village are appropriate for travel by foot, whether two-legged

    Biped
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    or four.

    Quadruped (note the older building methods evident in the logs used as support for the vault over the passage)
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    Most “streets” are wide enough to accommodate no more than one vehicle, ATV or auto – if that.

    Pass with care – try not to scrape the walls, if you can
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    Built on the side of the mountain, there is a lot of climbing involved but nearly every house has views across and down the gorge.

    Going down, vehicle friendly…
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    ...unfriendly
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    The look of the town is maintained throughout, even for new construction (our lodgings were in a recently constructed condo). The winter population is small, perhaps under 600. The town is very well kept, not only by the municipality, but the residents, as well.

    View into a B&B from the street – the local equivalent of a screen door
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    Grape Vine
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    Condo Pride
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    Capileira may seem dry in summer – that’s its dry season and totally great for tourism – but lack of water is not a problem here. Water control is. The concrete streets everywhere are clearly intended to mitigate erosion.

    It only seems dry
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    One can collect drinking water from any of the municipal fuentes marked “agua potable”.

    The fuente seen in the background of the previous image
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    Last edited: Nov 6, 2018
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  4. Hendrik

    Hendrik Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    825
    Feb 27, 2015
    Wayland MA
    Post 4 – My wife and I take a walk (in which the Pen-F tries to make it up to the 12-40)

    Before arriving in Spain, we had agreed it would be foolish to pass up a chance to go walking in the area around the town so we asked for guidance. This provoked some discussion and finally a route up the gorge was suggested.

    Cragginess worthy of Washington Irving or a 19th c. Romantic painting
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    We decided not to walk down to the river (which I recall having done in 2002 with two teens and two pre-teens and even then found quite strenuous), but walk on a generally level path along the east side of the gorge.

    You can't hear it but there is a very noisy brook running under the bridge
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    The garden plots eventually petered out.

    A lot of gates looked suspiciously like discarded bedsprings
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    Crags overhead
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    Poppies on the bank overhead
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    More flora

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    We walked until it seemed that we had expended half the exertion we had in us and then we walked back. We probably didn’t get much more than a mile from the town.

    Back neighborhood of Capileira barely visible, just right of center
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    Pooh had it right – time for a little something
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    Very, very yummy!
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2018
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  5. The Kathmandu Cat

    The Kathmandu Cat Mu-43 Regular

    86
    Dec 10, 2017
    Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Nice photos! I have the Pen-F with the Panny 20mm ii. Its a slow lens to focus but the images I think look sharper than the 17mm in many side by side comparisons. If the 20 was as fast as the 17 in its current pancake form it’d be perfect! Nice photos, some are a bit overexposed I’d say. Looking forward to more!
     
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  6. Hendrik

    Hendrik Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    825
    Feb 27, 2015
    Wayland MA
    Thanks for your thoughts. Interestingly, you’re not the only one who thinks this way about the P20. See here. I’ve also been burned more than once by the lens’ tendency for high iso banding on Oly bodies. The P20 is just not the lens for me. The O17 has a few bad habits I still need to master, but analyzing my usage of the focal lengths available using the 12-40 was truly an eye opener for me.
    Feel free to download any image and examine the histogram. None of these are straight out of camera. I suspect that either our tastes or our monitors differ. Cheers!
     
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  7. Hendrik

    Hendrik Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    825
    Feb 27, 2015
    Wayland MA
    Post 5 – We walk to Bubión (in which the E-M5 II and 40-150 Pro get to strut their stuff)


    The next day we walked with a friend down a footpath (sendero) to the outskirts of the next lower village, Bubión.


    A grotto along the sendero, very 19th c.
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    Water
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    Another grotto, beside a waterfall
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    Foxglove
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    Flock graze
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    Close to Bubión
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    Pano
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    "... an inordinate fondness for beetles..."
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    Gathering
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    It was nearly July 4, after all
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    Echos
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  8. Hendrik

    Hendrik Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    825
    Feb 27, 2015
    Wayland MA
    Post 6 – the Alhambra

    And now for something completely different!

    Visiting the Alhambra had been one of the highlights of our previous trip. Yes, the rules for visiting it are constraining. Yes, it is a touristic madhouse.

    Mementos
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    Yes, one has to wait for one’s opportunities.

    "I can’t believe I allow myself to appear in public with these people..."
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    Yes, it is worth it.

    Patience pays off (I had the scene to myself for a couple of seconds)
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    Scenery

    The Alhambra complex is quite large and if one were simply to walk from one end

    Walking from the car park entrance directly toward the Alcazaba, at the western extent – you’d never know it was there
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    The Alcazaba – large cube behind the poplars at right. Seen from the Generalife – Pano
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    to the other

    The Generalife (white building, dead center) seen from within the grounds of the Alhambra
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    and back, it would take the greater part of an hour. The ambience within the fortifications appears unostentatious and utilitarian. The little town that served and supported the palace within the walls is largely lost. That is not to say it is uninteresting.

    Walls, empty foundations, traces of lost structures
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    Doorway
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    Iglesia de Santa Maria de la Alhambra, built on the site of a mosque – pano
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    The Alcazaba is certainly imposing.

    The Alcazaba is a magnificent brick pile that can fill the frame
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    The Charles V palace stands in contrast and dwarfs the Nasrid Palace. Its size and positioning help to obliterate any sense of what the site might have been like before its construction. But the Nasrid Palace is what everybody comes to see.

    Nasrid Palace, center. Charles V Palace, right.
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    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
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  9. Hendrik

    Hendrik Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    825
    Feb 27, 2015
    Wayland MA
    Post 7 – Nasrid Interiors

    The Nasrid Palace (Palacio Nazaries) is the star of the show. Admission is limited, times are assigned and, among other things, backpacks are required to be worn on the chest. On the other hand, one can wander through at one’s own pace. From the outside, it cuts a rather discreet figure, especially next to the Charles V palace built adjoining it.

    The palace presents a modest face to the world outside – the Tower of the Ladies (foreground)
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    The interiors are entirely at odds with the reserved exteriors.

    Tower of the Ladies
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    Facade of the Comares
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    As the ad line goes, it’s bigger on the inside.

    Hall of the Ambassadors
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    Visual interest abounds!

    Looking through to the facade of the Comares
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    Looking from the Hall of the Boat to the South Gallery. The motif of the "drips" from the archway is said to recall the time the Prophet spent hiding in a cave (think stalactites - and take another look at the frieze on the facade of the Comares).
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    South Gallery – the structure behind is the Carlos V Palace
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    Layers
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    Even stripped of its furnishings, with its confused construction history only partially knowable, the Palace remains an architectural monument to its many authors.

    Rectangles
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    Nevertheless, it is still intriguing to speculate on what life must have been like within these walls for the Sultan, his family and retinue,

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    not to mention the effect the interiors might have had on visiting dignitaries.

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    Last edited: Dec 9, 2018
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  10. Hendrik

    Hendrik Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    825
    Feb 27, 2015
    Wayland MA
    Post 8 – Water Features

    Great care was taken in the design of the Alhambra to insure that, on what otherwise should be a dry hill top in a semi-arid countryside, not only would there be sufficient water, but that one would never be far from the sound of running water.

    One end of the Courtyard of the Lions
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    A fountain in a relatively out-of-the-way place
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    The water is diverted from the river Darro far upstream (approximately 6 km) and brought by acequia downhill to the Alhambra. Its presence transforms the palace from a place to get the Sultan’s job done cum safe domicile to a little bit of heaven on earth.


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    Water spills into the channel in the paving here
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    and arrives in the next pool here
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    It is, after all, a palace and, as such, a means of expressing wealth and power to all who may have had business with the Sultan.

    Courtyard of the Lions – 2018
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    In fact, on our prior visit, the water was not running and it was a far less vibrant experience.

    2002
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    Even modest amounts of water can serve as bling.

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    Last edited: Dec 9, 2018
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  11. Holoholo55

    Holoholo55 Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Aug 13, 2014
    Honolulu, HI
    Walter
    This entire series is just marvelous. Makes me want to jump on an airliner tomorrow and go there. Mahalo nui loa @Hendrik@Hendrik!
     
  12. Hendrik

    Hendrik Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    825
    Feb 27, 2015
    Wayland MA
    Post 9 – Nasrid Ceilings

    Perhaps the do-over to which I most looked forward was to shoot some of the truly astounding ceilings in the Palacio Nazaries.

    A later, Spanish ceiling. Perfectly fine, if a bit pedestrian…

    Plus Oultre - motto of Carlos V
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    It rather lacks the fantasy of the Moorish ceilings

    2002
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    2018
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    Throne Room - pano
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    The stalactite motif (mocárabe) may be most apparent when seen in silhouette,

    Courtyard of the Lions
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    but it is hardly confined to lintels.

    Niche at the north end of the Comares - pano
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    Detail - mocárabe ceiling of niche
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    One sees truly complex three-dimensional tessellation.

    Hall of the Two Sisters
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    Remember, the exteriors give no hint about the decoration within

    Hall of the Abencerrajes - exterior
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    In order to ease the visual narrative, I have placed my full shooting notes for the following images in the next post.

    The stalactite motif finds its fullest expression as ceiling decoration. Among a few others, I had shot the ceiling of the Hall of the Abencerrajes in 2002 with the OM-2 and a 50mm lens.

    Hall of the Abencerrajes - 2002
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    Enter the Pen-F and O17

    Hall of the Abencerrajes - 2018
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    Hall of the Ambassadors
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    Hall of the Two Sisters
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    Hall of the Two Sisters, peak, 100% crop
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    Last edited: Dec 15, 2018
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  13. Hendrik

    Hendrik Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    825
    Feb 27, 2015
    Wayland MA
    Shooting the Nasrid Ceilings


    I had photographed a few of the more amazing ceilings in 2002 with the (manual focus) OM-2 by the simple expedient of approximating focus, putting the camera on the floor on its back and using the self timer.


    OM-2 scan (2820 x 1842)
    Spain 56082016-03-01-0020PB.jpg
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    The problem then was twofold – achieving critical focus and framing. Don’t forget, the camera has to be picked up to advance the film. The ceilings are not particularly bright. The 50mm lens I was using led to a constricted field of view, too. I enjoyed the challenge and I love those film images, but even though they give some idea of the effect, they don’t scale particularly well and they don’t start to convey the intensity of massed detail to be seen. Finally, at some magnification, one is resolving grain, not meaningful detail. For all but the sharpest 35mm negatives, the sweet spot seems to me to be ~5mp.


    OM-2 scan - 100% crop (1597 x 1198)
    Spain 56082016-03-01-0020PB-2.jpg
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    Enter the Pen-F with its articulating screen, S-AF+M and Hi-Res. With a tilt screen, one would need to guess at both framing and AF point aiming and then we're back to playing by 2002 rules. With the articulating screen set to the selfie position, one can both frame and focus manually (peaking & magnifying) with the camera already in position on the ground. Hi-Res cleans up the image wonderfully.


    Pen-F HIRes ORF (10368 x 7776)
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    Pen-F HiRes ORF - 100% crop (1599 x 1199)
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    Trying to keep my bag simple and the on-site process speedy, I decided not to take a remote (radio trigger or direct cable) but to use the touch screen to trip the shutter, as well. Unfortunately, O.I.Share doesn’t work with any mode out of the ordinary, otherwise I would have preferentially used the phone as a remote. Also, probably thanks to some slight misalignment or an unfortunate departure from spec, my Pen-F has trouble accepting a cabled remote – it has already ruined one. Even with the O17, with the camera on the floor I had to go into contortions to not appear in the frame, despite kneeling. It only occurred to me later to use the HI-Res delay setting to mitigate this problem. Even this has a downside – one never knows when the next crowd will arrive.


    Except for the fact that it doesn’t lie perfectly flat on the floor (the eyecup and thumb grip prevent this), the Pen-F proved to be a good candidate for this task. To speed things up and keep thinking (and, thus, forgetting and fumbling) to a minimum, I had previously set C4 for Hi-Res. It worked a charm – except when I forgot to dial back to normal. The major hack I would introduce in the future is a flat plate of something fitted with three soft button feet, sized to fit in the well normally occupied by the touch screen, and of sufficient thickness to remove the eyecup and thumb grip from contact with the floor. With the feet down, something like this would serve to align the sensor with the floor more closely, removing some distortion from the images.


    The location presents further difficulties. Flash is forbidden. Much, but not all, of the light comes from stray sunlight reflected from the floor. The success of this sort of long- (~1/8 sec.) and multi-exposure (x 8) photography is limited by the variability of the available light due to the more than occasional presence of large tour groups. Avoiding substantial floor motion is also critical. In fact, I suspect that, despite my efforts to settle the camera before each exposure set, my proximity may have robbed the captures of some sharpness. The O17 is just a bit too long for some of the ceilings. I suspect either the 12-40 or 7-14 (at the long end) and perhaps the O12/2 would be nearly ideal. They would all work – I was shooting the O17 at f/3.2 and slower. The dead center of the floor is usually roped off and a wider lens might have trouble being no further than arm’s length from the rope barriers. The guards indulged me by allowing me to place the camera within the roped-off area as long as I did not violate the line. Still, I think I could just about nail one of these shots in another visit or two using a slightly shorter lens and, perhaps, focus stacking. It could happen.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2018
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  14. Reading you little essay on the last post you should probably look into a Platypod Ultra as this will support you camera and keep it level. I picked one up a few weeks ago and I'm really impressed with it. Scott Kelby was using one in St Peters in Rome which has a strict "no tripod" rule and the security was bemused by this little device and left him alone to do his shots.
    it's made for travelling so it really lightweight and breaks down into small pieces.
    Very nice pictures. I've looked through all of them and enjoyed seeing your visit. TFS.
     
  15. Hendrik

    Hendrik Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    825
    Feb 27, 2015
    Wayland MA
    Thank you for the kind feedback and suggestion.

    The Platypod does indeed look interesting and worthy of investigation but I suspect it is not ideal for this specific use since it also requires a tripod head. I was already carrying a mini tripod that I think I could have gotten away with using (footprint ~ 10" in diameter). The advantages of putting the camera directly on the floor are the simplicity of the setup, the automatically near-perfect alignment and maximization of the distance to the subject (framing). My proposed hack would offer virtually identical benefits but with increased accuracy of alignment. Its drawback is clearly its single-purpose, non-adjustable nature.

    Besides, we were traveling as a group of four and, even though I was driving (and therefore in no danger of being left to fend for myself), I didn't want to get bogged down in setup and consequently lag far enough behind to alienate my companions. I may be the first to be ready to push away from the table but I'm typically the last to leave a site that interests me. ;) 
     
  16. Thanks for the reply Hendrik. I thought about it after I posted and realized that maybe you had the right idea in first place and do not want any more weight than is totally necessary to carry around. Certainly setting it up to get a good alignment would be difficult with a ball head.
    I'll look forward to seeing more of your pics.
     
  17. Hendrik

    Hendrik Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    825
    Feb 27, 2015
    Wayland MA
    Post 10 – Coda: the Generalife, etc.

    The Generalife was added last and served as a not-too-remote retreat from affairs of state. ("Generalife" is said to be a Spanish transliteration/bastardization of an Arabic phrase meaning, approximately, Architect's Garden.)

    The designs of the several gardens within the Alhambra are modern interpretations of whatever knowledge is available about past practices. Needless to say, they are not universally accepted as "authentic".
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    Apart from the extensive gardens and major water feature (the watchword here seems to have been “more”)

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    this part of the complex, while still grand, gives the impression of being more informal and perhaps even a bit down-homey in a regal sort of way.

    The lions are no doubt a Spanish Royal accretion. The Alcazaba can be seen at the left, beyond the ridgeline.
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    Details
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    Sitting on its front stoop
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    What would have been a view of the Alhambra's mosque – now looking back to the Iglesia de Sta. Maria de la Alhambra. The Nasrid palace complex can be seen lower right, in front of the bulkier Carlos V Palace.
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    Views of Granada

    The views of and across Granada from the Alhambra are stunning, especially from the Alcazaba

    Looking generally northwest. The Albaicín (Moorish quarter) is to the right
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    Looking back to the east and the Sierra Nevada is no joke, either.
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    15 minutes out from Málaga, on our way to Turkey, looking north at the Sierra Nevada from over the Mediterranean.
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    The end - thanks for looking!
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2019
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  18. Again, thanks for sharing these images. It has been really nice to see the non-touristy places in Spain shot so well. :2thumbs:
     
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