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Some questions about accesoires

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by Dede, Nov 10, 2011.

  1. Dede

    Dede Mu-43 Regular

    94
    Oct 10, 2011
    Hey,

    I got a couple questions on accesoires for my Olympus E-PM1.

    1. I plan on getting this filter: Amazon.com: B+W 37mm Clear UV Haze with Multi-Resistant Coating (010M): Camera & Photo, for my 14-42mm Olympus II R lens. Apparently this filter is good and the filtersize for the lens is 37mm, right?

    2. Can I put such a lens hood: http://www.amazon.com/RinbowImaging...4?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1320975335&sr=1-4, on my lens when I already got a filter on it?

    3. Can I leave this filter I mentioned on 1 on my lens all the time? I mean, does the UV-Filter have any negative effect on the IQ when I shoot inside?

    Thanks in advance for all replies
     
  2. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    1. Yes, that is the correct filter size, and yes B+W filters are very good.

    2. Yes, you can use the hood with the filter. This should be a bayonet hood so it will fit outside the filter. If it were a threaded hood it would still fit as the filter has the same thread that it fits into. Both types of hoods will therefore work, but this hood will be the former type.

    3. Technically, a clear filter will only degrade your image quality if anything on a digital system with digital glass (both glass and sensor are already UV coated)... as opposed to a hood which only improves image quality (cuts glare to increase contrast). However, a good B+W UV Haze is not going to have anything but a negligible affect on your IQ. They are very high quality filters and I'm sure you won't notice a difference with it on. If you really want the best IQ then just use the hood, but honestly you will have nothing to worry about with your B+W filter.

    I have to ask though... what is your purpose for getting a UV filter? If it is for protection, then what kind of protection? For bumps and falls your hood is your best protection as it will physically protect the element from bumps, and will absorb shock in the case of falls. A filter on the other hand will shatter before your front element and can therefore cause damage to the front element by scratching it with pieces of glass while the durable front element would have been fine otherwise. However, for blowing dust and sand or such, liquid spills, etc., the UV filter can be useful. Or maybe you have a different reason altogether... ;)
     
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  3. Dede

    Dede Mu-43 Regular

    94
    Oct 10, 2011
    First of all, thank you so much Ned for this quick, and very very helpful reply. As for the reason why I want a filter, there are a couple ones.

    First of, the thing that is on front of the 14-42mm lens right now, (I guess just a placeholder for the filter) is so loose and feels just unoworthy. I don't know, but for me this one thing just gives a horrible feel to the whole lens (I hope I made my point understandable :)).

    Another reason is, that I heard that pictures which include a lot of sunlight look better with filters. (Although this point is kind of negilible, because I mainly want the lens to feel better ;D).
     
  4. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Hmmm... as far as the sunlight part, Neutral Density filters are usually what you want to even that out. I don't know (not saying yay or nay) if a UV filter will really have much or any affect there.

    As for improving the front of your lens... yeah, I can see your point there. :) I used to like having a UV filter on my Zuiko 25mm f/2.8 pancake, 'cause I thought the tiny front element looked too puny otherwise, lol. I use a UV filter on my Zuiko 50mm f/1.4, partially because the lens is old enough to make use of it, but mostly because I have some messy threads on that lens and the UV filter covers that with fresh threads. ;)
     
  5. nickthetasmaniac

    nickthetasmaniac Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2011
    A UV filter on a digital camera will have no effect on the way the image looks, unless it's a crappy filter and makes the picture look worse. I think they helped reduce haze when shooting on film, but my understanding is that digital sensors inherently filter UV anyway...

    You may have got muddled with terms between 'UV' and something like a 'CPL' (Polariser) or 'ND' (Neutral Density, like Ned mentioned) - both of these and several other filter types will effect the look of an image.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. Dede

    Dede Mu-43 Regular

    94
    Oct 10, 2011
    Alright, thanks for all the replies. But well, when the UV filter has no effect on the way the image looks, I could basically use it for my purposes (lens protections, and mainly replacing that weird ring). Alright, I guess I'm going to order that filter soon, thanks :)
     
  7. nickthetasmaniac

    nickthetasmaniac Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2011
    Yep, that's what most people use them for :smile:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Dede

    Dede Mu-43 Regular

    94
    Oct 10, 2011
    Perfect, thanks a lot :)