Some opinions on steps I should take regarding lenses

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by Hotahseh, May 17, 2014.

  1. Hotahseh

    Hotahseh Mu-43 Regular

    57
    May 12, 2014
    Miami
    JC
    Hey guys jumping into the m43 scene pretty late but extremely interested, and have posted about using it as a travel/second body. Was hoping it will get me away from my full frame. --have introduction post about it all.


    Anyways, I found an ep2 for dirt cheap 80$ in great condition. Using this body as my gateway into the scene.

    When it comes to lenses I was wondering on what you guys think would be the wisest thing to do according to getting lenses.

    - Get a kit lens and start shooting, and then save for 3 main primes that cover generally everything?

    Or get kit lens to start shooting and just save for the 12-40 f2. (I think I'm off on exactly mm size of the lens, correct me if I'm wrong).

    Would really like to see some input on how others have worked their way up from scratch like how I am doing.
     
  2. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Hi, the Oly 12-40mm is F2.8.

    If you prefer primes get one first (12, 17, 25mm are all good general use although 12 is pretty wide), otherwise get a cheap zoom... Look in the deals forum, you can get a new camera body with the 14-42mm for $200 right now.
    Or get a pancake zoom or a super zoom such as the 14-150.

    Barry




    Sent from my iPad using Mu-43
     
  3. Hotahseh

    Hotahseh Mu-43 Regular

    57
    May 12, 2014
    Miami
    JC
    The pancake zoom will cover what ranges?
     
  4. bikerhiker

    bikerhiker Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 24, 2013
    Canada
    David
    If you can get the $199 Olympus E-PM2 kit with the 14-42 all the better. That's a modern camera with a modern sensor and a good zoom lens to boot. E-PM2 can deliver images that can rival some of the modern full frame DSLR.

    Look at this guy's review..

    http://blog.atmtxphoto.com/2013/10/30/how-does-the-canon-6d-compare-with-olympus-micro-43/

    Primes are the way to go to offset the 2 stops advantage of the full frame against the E-PM2. It'll be a bit more against the E-P2. But if you do get the E-P2, I would get a kit zoom and then a prime you like using most.
     
  5. Hotahseh

    Hotahseh Mu-43 Regular

    57
    May 12, 2014
    Miami
    JC
    I completely see it all now, I really can't pass up a deal like that
     
  6. budeny

    budeny Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 4, 2014
    Boulder, CO
    It would help if you can provide more information about your shooting style and subjects.
    I'm for landscapes and my holly trinity is 7-14, 12-35 and 75 lenses.
     
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  7. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    What lenses do you use with your FF? Emulating what you use now and doing the same in m4/3s may go a long way to making you feel more comfortable with the new format. There's nothing wrong with the EP-2, it's a great performing camera, but really still the first generation Olympus m4/3s body. That said, I still use my E-P1 and E-P2 quite successfully as general purpose cameras.
     
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  8. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    I think the 12-50 could be a great cheap option. It's as fast as the kit lens, has macro mode, one extra button, electric and manual zoom, it's 12mm on the wide end...ok, at 50 is slow but at least you have 50. And you could add something like a panasonic 20 1.7 for low light.

    I would not spend 1000$ on a lens for an 80$ body unless you plan to invest more in the system in the long run.
     
  9. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Hi,

    Panasonic pancake zoom:
    12-32mm F3.5-5.6
    14-42mm F3.5-5.6 X PZ

    Olympus:
    14-42mm F3.5-5.6 EZ

    Note that most or all of these are Electric Zoom only; no manual zoom ring.


    Olympus compact zoom (larger than pancake):
    14-42mm F3.5-5.6 II / II R

    I agree with the above poster that the 12-50mm is a good option; it's weather sealed, has macro, etc.
    If you get the 12-40mm, that would make the 12-50 rather redundant as they're both the same length.

    The Oly 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 II / II R is the one with the camera deal for $199; the lens itself is worth at least that much.

    Barry
     
  10. Ulfric M Douglas

    Ulfric M Douglas Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 6, 2010
    Northumberland
    e-P2 is my main outdoor camera, with VF-2 viewfinder. Great pictures!
    Buy the M.Zuiko 45mm for a great prime.
    Buy any of the wide pancakes for pocket : 14mm, 17mm, 20mm.
    absolutely buy the M.Zuiko 40-150 cheap ASAP.
     
  11. Hotahseh

    Hotahseh Mu-43 Regular

    57
    May 12, 2014
    Miami
    JC
    Well my shooting style does vary, I do a lot of events, portraits, and automotive photography. I would be interested in the 40-150 since it does indeed cover a huge range.

    Another thing I had issues with was the actual deal, doesn't seem to be working for me [emoji17] seems it's expired
     
  12. 2112

    2112 Mu-43 Regular

    164
    Apr 3, 2014
    Emerald Isle, NC.
    Mark
    It depends on what your shooting style.

    I went with a panny 14mm, 20mm, sigma 30mm for primes and also have a 14-42ez for a standard zoom and love the combo.
     
  13. Hotahseh

    Hotahseh Mu-43 Regular

    57
    May 12, 2014
    Miami
    JC
    Yea cheap zoom for now and then just work with primes I think will do and move up on body later when the fund are in lol
     
  14. wilson

    wilson Mu-43 Regular

    44
    Mar 26, 2014
    That's unfortunate, that PM2 deal was originally a one day deal that lasted two days... I guess newegg had a few left over, so ran it again till they sold out.
    I don't use my 40-150mm (80-300 equiv) lens much at all, its just too long for my usage. But since I got it for $100, it didn't cost me much. But I'll probably use it when I go on a trip.

    I tend to keep the 14mm f/2.5 pancake on my camera when I throw it in my bag when I go to work since it's compact, and it's wide enough for everyday shots. It would have been better for me if Panasonic had chosen to do a 12mm prime rather than 14mm lens. So I purchased the 12-50mm Olympus lens to get wider without spending over $300, but also don't use it much since it's just too big, and kind of slow at 12mm compared to the 14mm prime (f/3.5 vs f/2.5).

    Surprisingly enough, I use the manual focus Samyang 7.5mm f/3.5 fisheye lens more that I expected. There's a thread somewhere on this forum with the photos from that lens. https://www.mu-43.com/showthread.php?t=16458
    You can defish its photos in Lightroom with parameters supplied by some enthusiasts on the dpreview forum. DXO Optics pro can also defish the distortion using manual controls. The advent of a digital workflow has made fisheye lenses much more practical than during the film days. The Samyang lens is relatively inexpensive for a fisheye with really good quality.
    http://www.ephotozine.com/article/samyang-7-5mm-f-3-5-umc-fisheye-lens-review-19847
    http://m43photo.blogspot.com/2012/02/samyang-75mm-f35-fisheye-lens-review.html

    I like playing with the adapted Canon FD lenses on my cameras as well... I've collected quite a few decent lenses for not much money compared to native lenses. These old lenses don't tend to resolve as much resolution as the newer built for M43 lenses. They're more for experimenting with, and improving my photography skills than actually taking everyday pictures.
     
  15. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Great start! That's a classic body for sure. Very stylish and well-built, even if it is slow and soft to today's standards. I took many great commercial images with the venerable E-P1 in the day, so I can't say I can complain about it!

    (Yeah, you were off by one stop... it's an f/2.8, not f/2... unfortunately, lol.)

    The choice between primes and zooms is really a matter of personal preference in shooting style, so nobody can directly answer that question besides yourself. One thing that can be said though, is that going with primes first would allow you to get away from your kit lens right away be letting you start cheap with one standard prime,

    It doesn't really take 3 lenses to cover the range of a standard zoom though (which are normally built at about 3x zoom for a fast f/2.8, and doesn't cover a huge focal range). It takes 2 lenses at most, 1 lens at the least. For instance, in the range of the m.Zuiko 12-40mm/2.8, the ideal prime kit would be the m.Zuiko 12mm/2 and the m.Zuiko 45mm/1.8. There is no need for a stop gap in between, as it would take much less time to step forward or backwards to meet that focal length using the lens you have mounted, than it would be to change lenses. Meeting the widest angle and the longest angle of the zoom is the ideal solution because it will give you the same "capabilities" in terms of how far you can reach and how tight a space you can fit into. On the other hand, if you go with the single lens replacement then you'll probably want something in the middle, like in this case something like the Leica 25mm f/1.4 Summilux would fit perfect. That covers the range in a general sense with more foot movement, but you will need to get in a little closer at times or back off a little further at times (and hopefully have enough room to).

    The reason I'm pointing that out is because you should be planning ahead on your lens purchases, especially if you are buying primes, so that you do not get too redundantly close and therefore take longer and spend more money to complete your perfect set. For instance, if you want to use the single-lens standard replacement solution, then you might start off with something like a 25mm as your standard lens, which would then allow you to make your next upgrade a mid-tele like the m.Zuiko 75mm/1.8 or maybe the m.Zuiko 60mm/2.8 Macro (just as an example). Or, maybe you want to go with the 12mm/45mm combo or something similar (like how about the much cheaper but still excellent Lumix 14mm/2.5 for the wider angle?). If that's the case then you don't want to start off with a single 25mm as that would set you back and make you have to wait before you can complete your combo. You might then make a progression like starting with the 14mm/2.5, then the 45mm/1.8, then the 75mm/1.8... Note that by the time you have a 3-lens prime kit, you should have a broader range than the 12-40mm/2.8 zoom, not an equivalent range.

    Well, when I was shooting SLRs I would start with a standard 50mm prime. When I started with DSLRs I started with a fast zoom... first in the standard range, then add a super-tele zoom. When I started with Micro Four-Thirds I didn't start from scratch because the new bodies were adaptable to all my old lenses. So I can't really say how I did start from scratch, but I can say how I would if I had to. ;) i actually found that the m4/3 system has totally re-invigorated my use of prime lenses. The system is so perfect for them... There are different advantages to both primes and zooms, but most of the small bodies seem perfectly suited for many of the methods for shooting prime style. For instance, when one is dedicated to primes you will usually shoot with multiple bodies on a regular basis. The tiny, inexpensive bodies makes carrying many bodies at a time an easy deal. Also, one advantage of primes is that even though a full kit can be just as bulky or even bulkier than a zoom kit, each individual prime lens is much smaller and faster. That will allow you to build smaller kits and section your kits off for different purposes, allowing you for instance to have a really small "everyday carry" bag.

    In general, I find primes to be more "versatile", while zooms are more "convenient".
     
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  16. incabloc

    incabloc Mu-43 Top Veteran

    539
    May 21, 2012
    Great stuffs by Ned on his comments above. :thumbup:
     
  17. Hotahseh

    Hotahseh Mu-43 Regular

    57
    May 12, 2014
    Miami
    JC
    Seriously really appreciate that complete thought and response.

    So in response to everything I was thinking for my first prime as an everyday I would carry a 17 prime. I like the length, I have read and investigated the forum and read up how the 2.8 is really slow. Never would figure that a 2.8 would be do slow as referred to here on this site?
     
  18. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Another good deal: E-PM2 with 14-42mm and 40-150mm, $299
    http://www.adorama.com/IOMEPM2SK2.html

    Barry
     
  19. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Naw, f/2.8 is not really slow. In the world of zooms it's considered a fast lens. :) It's just slower than what you can do with primes. It's a full stop slower than an f/2, 1.5 stops slower than an f/1.8, and 2 stops slower than an f/1.4. Losing a stop of light will basically require you to either halve your shutter speed or double your ISO to compensate. So although I would not consider f/2.8 to be "slow", every stop at that point does make a big difference.

    But... there is an m.Zuiko 17mm f/1.8 if that is in your budget. :) The m.Zuiko 17mm/2.8 is the pancake lens which is very tiny, extremely inexpensive, but also not as well-regarded.
     
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