Some from Yellowstone (10 imgs)

Discussion in 'Scenic, Architecture, and Travel' started by Maczero, Feb 28, 2013.

  1. Maczero

    Maczero Mu-43 Regular

    141
    Feb 13, 2010
    Fife
    Rather belatedly I have stopped faffing around with ways to organise my image library and have started to catalogue and process a large backlog of images (which explains some of the really bizarre file names that they have).

    Here are 10 images which I would value some constructive comment on - either in terms of the processing (I used C1 7, although I suspect that the programme is less important than what I did with it) and the composition.

    Three from the Lower Falls:

    YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_235_on_16-06-12_at_16-50_P6160226_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web.

    YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_237_on_16-06-12_at_16-51_P6160228_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web.

    YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_583_on_18-06-12_at_17-43_P6180224_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web.

    One from Artist's Paint Pots:

    YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_501_on_17-06-12_at_21-27_P6170137_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web.

    Two early morning shots from the Hayden and Lamar valleys:

    YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_625_on_19-06-12_at_12-59_P6190266_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web.

    YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_641_on_19-06-12_at_13-59_P6190282_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web.

    Two from Upper Geyser Basin:

    YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_1002_on_22-06-12_at_P6220145_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web.

    YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_1007_on_22-06-12_at_P6220150_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web.

    One from Lower Geyser Basin:

    YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_1312_on_23-06-12_at_P6230102_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web.

    And finally, one from Mammoth Hot Springs:

    YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_1390_on_23-06-12_at_P6230180_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web.

    All of them were taken with the E-M5 and what turned out to be a very workable travel kit of the 12-50 and 75-300 principally, and the 9-18 and PL 25 in support.

    Andrew
     
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  2. cherrywood

    cherrywood Mu-43 Regular

    120
    Dec 17, 2010
    Ohio
    Yellowstone

    Love the buffalo and Artist's Point falls, I go out often to fly fish the small streams, if you get off the road 200 yards the fishing is great.
    Thanks for the photos brings back good mem's.
    Dennis
     
  3. foxtail1

    foxtail1 Science geek & photo nut

    Dec 30, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Kristi
    My favorite is the Artist's Paint Pots pic.
     
  4. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    Ah Yellowstone....and you've captured it quite well! :smile:
     
  5. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
    You've captured some wonderful images of one of the most magical places on earth.

    As far as feedback on composition, these three images leave me flat:
    YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_235_on_16-06-12_at_16-50_P6160226_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web. 150> YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_583_on_18-06-12_at_17-43_P6180224_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web. 150> YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_1390_on_23-06-12_at_P6230180_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web. 150>

    In each of these, I feel like the cropping is too much and the context to the point that the context of the image is lost. In addition there is nothing in these shots that gives me any sense of perspective/scale in the scene.

    The three shots that really stand out to me are the bubbling mud of the paint pots (you did a really nice job of capturing the "action" there), the Hayden Valley shot (with the reflection of the clouds) and the shot of the lone bison.

    With the Paint Pot shot I would crop it with the "rule of thirds" in mind, probably aiming to put the tall splatter at approximately the right third of the frame (i.e. cropping out a bit of the bottom and right side of the image as it exists now). I would also take a look at what a B&W treatment would look like with that image, which is already very monochromatic as is.

    I feel that the Hayden Valley shot could also be improved by moving the horizon line either lower or slightly higher in the frame (again, following the "rule of thirds").

    The lone bison image is compositionally very strong (to my eye) already, but I might play with that as more of a panoramic image (i.e. cropping it to a shorter, wider aspect ratio). I'm not certain this would be an improvement, but it's something that I would explore.

    I'm curious, what are we looking at in this image?
    YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_1002_on_22-06-12_at_P6220145_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web. 150 />

    I suspect it's a close-up of a rock formation, but it brings to mind some of the incredible satellite images of various landforms I have see of late.
     
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  6. Maczero

    Maczero Mu-43 Regular

    141
    Feb 13, 2010
    Fife
    DeeJayK

    Thanks really for the critical feedback - it's a bit difficult to get sometimes.

    I'd like to explain the thinking behind the three images that left you flat and with that in mind see what you think.

    The first was a a close zoom (in camera) of the Lower Falls. My aim was to get away from the conventional postcard image (e.g the one that follows and provide an impression of the power of the falls. BTW I disagree about perspective. There are pine trees in the bottom of the frame that I intended to provide context for scale.

    The second was heavily cropped after the fact (because I shot it with the 12-50 at 50 (I should have changed the lens). I intend it as an abstract representation of the spray, rainbow and rocks at the Lower Falls.

    The third. Yeah, you probably have me there. I was attracted by the lugubrious 'expression' of the mound. Might work better in B&W or maybe not at all.

    Point on cropping at Artist's Pain Pots taken

    The image you didn't know what it was was a pattern in the bacterial bloom in geyser runoff in Upper Geyser Basin.

    Thanks for the feedback. I appreciate it.

    Andrew
     
  7. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
    I can see what you are going for on these, and they're not "bad" images per se. My comment was mostly that meant to say that they didn't speak to me and that they felt like the weakest images in the set. I definitely respect your intent to look at an image and try to capture a scene in a non-standard way.

    You are obviously right about the trees in the first image (my comment about scale applies more to the other two). I guess my dislike (though that term is much too strong) of the first image may be due to my subconscious expectation that I should be able to see the entire falls since that's the way I've been conditioned to expect to see waterfall images. Trying to capture the "power" of waterfall from that vantage point is a difficult challenge -- I don't really know how I would go about that.

    Those mounds are very interesting formations, but I can't recall seeing too many compelling images of them. Part of that is likely due to the fact that your choices of perspective and framing are limited by the walkways that you cannot stray from and also that you're very likely limited to using available light at whatever time you happen to show up to that spot.

    Thanks for taking my (constructive, I hope) criticism in the spirit in which it was given. I know that I don't have ten images of Yellowstone on my hard drive that could stand up to these.

    By the way, is your location Fife as in just north of Tacoma?
     
  8. Maczero

    Maczero Mu-43 Regular

    141
    Feb 13, 2010
    Fife
    Nope

    Fife, as in Kingdom of Fife in Scotland. Yellowstone is a long way. If it weren't I'd be there now taking winter shots. A fantastic place to visit.

    I really appreciated your comments. A bit of friendly constructive criticism is really helpful. We could all do with it from time to time I reckon. Many thanks.

    Andrew
     
  9. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
    I figured as much, but I thought there was a chance we were (nearish) neighbors given that you were shooting Yellowstone, which is much closer to me than it is to you.

    Actually, when I saw the title of your post I was really hoping to see some winter shots as they can be amazing. I'm a bit embarrassed to say that despite growing up in Montana, I've never been to the park in the winter.

    That said, I can definitely identify with falling behind of processing shots. :wink:
     
  10. Maczero

    Maczero Mu-43 Regular

    141
    Feb 13, 2010
    Fife
    Sorry, meant to add that I actually don't agree with you about the rule of thirds and the Alum Creek shot. I think this is a case (reflections, feeling of harmony etc) where a balanced composition is better than the dynamic which the rule of thirds brings. (It works really well in recropping the Artists Paint Pots shot BTW). That said, I think a tighter crop on the Alum Creek image is better. Here is 'Take 2':

    YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_625_on_19-06-12_at_12-59_P6190266_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web_1.

    Any comments?

    Andrew
     
  11. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I so want to go back to Yellowstone! I was there for just 2 days about 15 years ago. I shoot several rolls of 35mm, one of which didn't turn out well. That was when I was new to serious photography and didn't know much.

    I love most of your shots with the Alum Creek reflection shot being my favorite. I even like the first crop although I do like the second a bit better. I agree with you, that sometimes the rules are best to be broken. Besides it does fit with some other rules of composition. For instance "balancing elements" rule or as you called it "feeling of harmony". The rule of "leading lines" also fits as the clouds form a line of sorts.

    I do think that the first lower falls shot is off. The second one is excellent and I really like the third one too. I think it has good composition, the subject being the rainbow with a stiff contrast of the mist and the rock. The paint pot shot is great but I do think it might look better as a B&W{but then I do love B&W!}.

    Hope you have some more to post up. Thanks!
     
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  12. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
    I think that is an improvement over the original. And I see you point reading the symmetry.

    Placing the horizon dead center can just lead to a very "static" composition. That said, the point made above that composition "rules" (e.g. the rule of thirds) are made to be broken is well taken. On the other hand I do believe that there are very elemental reasons why most of these rules came to be involving the "golden mean", basic human proportions (think of Da Vinci's sketch off the male form) and such. For that reason, whenever I'm doing framing or cropping I always want to keep these "rules" in mind, even if I don't end up strictly adhering to them in the final output.

    The colors and cloud formations and the amazing reflection in that particular image are truly wonderful. I'm inclined to agree that your cropping is best, but the point of making the suggestion was mostly to just get you to consider some other options.

    I'd love to see your re-cropped Paint Pot shot.
     
  13. Maczero

    Maczero Mu-43 Regular

    141
    Feb 13, 2010
    Fife
    Your wish is my command, B&W Paint Pots coming up:

    YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_501_on_17-06-12_at_21-27_P6170137_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web_1.

    And as a bonus a head portait of a bull bison near Sulphur Cauldron:

    YellowstoneTetonGlacierNP_366_on_17-06-12_at_16-35_P6170001_Wildlife_Yellowstone-Web_1.

    I converted this to B&W because it was an early morning shot at ISO 4000 and I thought there was slight banding in the dark fur. The B&W does away with this.

    Andrew
     
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