Some color issues with omd em 1

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by TJC-MFT, Mar 20, 2017.

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  1. TJC-MFT

    TJC-MFT Mu-43 Regular

    38
    Dec 4, 2013
    Cheboygan, Michigan
    Tom Cadwalader
    With my OMD EM1 I have always had issues getting some shade of reds and a few blues right.
    For the reds it lighter reds that are nearing orange and some dark blues are tough.
    I shoot raw only and process in Lightroom on calibrated monitors. I have to use the HSL sliders to get the colors right. I have created a preset to apply to quickly get it applied.
    I am wondering if others have seen this ?
    Also it's my understanding that the adjustments in the cameras menu would only impact the jpegs and video not raw files. Is that correct?
    Thanks for any help with this.
     
  2. David A

    David A Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 30, 2011
    Brisbane, Australia
    The only problems with colour I've noticed with my E-M1 relate to the Panasonic 25mm f/1.4 lens which I found delivered a slight green colour cast compared to Olympus lenses and to white balance. I leave the camera's white balance setting on Auto but sometimes find it a little off. Using Lightroom's Auto white balance button usually doesn't give me a result I like but shift clicking on the Tint slider name does an Auto Hue adjustment without affecting the colour temperature and I find that works quite often for me. You can shift click on the temperature slider name as well for an auto temperature adjustment which doesn't affect Tint. I don't know if you can include these individual slider auto actions in a preset

    If you use Lightroom, take a look at the Camera Calibration panel right down at the bottom of the Develop controls. You can make some RGB adjustments there and save that as a develop preset. You can also choose from several camera profiles apart from the default Adobe Standard profile and one of those profiles may suit you better.

    And if you want to go really extreme you can actually create a specific camera profile for your camera. You need a standard colour test target and some software (Adobe have a free downloadable app and some test targets come with software) and you ideally need a standardised lighting environment but you could make a Daylight profile outdoors on a clear sunny day though you may find yourself wanting separate seasonal light profiles if you live a long way from the Equator. I've never done it but I've seen the instructions for doing it in several places.

    The adjustments to colour you can make in camera, apart from white balance, don't affect the RAW files.
     
  3. TJC-MFT

    TJC-MFT Mu-43 Regular

    38
    Dec 4, 2013
    Cheboygan, Michigan
    Tom Cadwalader
    "If you use Lightroom, take a look at the Camera Calibration panel right down at the bottom of the Develop controls. You can make some RGB adjustments there and save that as a develop preset. You can also choose from several camera profiles apart from the default Adobe Standard profile and one of those profiles may suit you better."
    I do use the camera calibration settings but totally forgot about the RGB adjustments. That might be a better way to effect he color. I'll have to play around in there and see what becomes of it. Thanks. I am going to take a look at the Adobe app as well.
     
  4. gnarlydog australia

    gnarlydog australia Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Feb 23, 2015
    Brisbane, Australia
    Damiano Visocnik
    I find that any image I develop from RAW requires a very complex process of grading since not two images are alike.
    Even when I take photographs of the same subject, seconds apart, with different lenses, my colors are rather different.
    Presets might work if somebody is using just a few lenses but with myself heavily interested in vintage glass (50+ lenses) that it's often fuzzy, with strong hues, presets don't work.
    I am afraid that for any image that warrants publishing some thoughtful editing is required; so my work is always done in Photoshop where I can balance out different areas of the image instead of globally.
     
  5. Steven

    Steven Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 25, 2012
    USA
    I recently took a bunch of photos at events that featured a lot of red - Chinese New Year and Women's Day protests. I used RAW+JPEG and I found it difficult to get the reds in RAW to look good, or at least as good as the JPEG reds. I often just ended up using the JPEG, which are thankfully fairly flexible.
    The Lightroom calibration presets for Olympus RAWs are not always as good as JPEG and with a lot of saturated reds they are very far off, just smudging colors all over the place. I know Olympus own program is supposed to be the best for RAW conversion, but I don't want to make it too complicated for myself.