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Snake River Canyon, Idaho

Discussion in 'Scenic, Architecture, and Travel' started by AaronE, Jan 27, 2019.

  1. AaronE

    AaronE Mu-43 Veteran

    472
    May 23, 2013
    Idaho
    Unusually warm weather in southwest Idaho this weekend. My wife and I took advantage and went for a hike along the Snake River in the Birds of Prey National Conservation Area in southwestern Idaho.

    The Snake River forms in southwestern Yellowstone National Park and flows south through Grand Teton National Park. It then turns west and flows across southern Idaho. Then into Oregon, then Washington where it finally dumps into the Columbia River. The Snake River is 1,078 miles in length. About 14,500 years ago, Lake Bonneville in the Great Salt Lake area, formed in the last glacial period, spilled catastrophically down into the Snake River in an event known as the Bonneville Flood. This was one of the first in a series of catastrophic flooding events in the Northwest known as the Ice Age Floods. These floods cut the deep Snake River Canyon that is visible today in Idaho from Twin Falls to Marsing.

    The Birds of Prey National Conservation Area supports one of the largest nesting populations of bird of prey in the world. Birds of prey make use of the high cliffs for nesting and large population of small mammals for food to produce highly successful off-spring.

    All images were taken between 11:00 AM and 2:30 PM, MST. All images captured with Olympus Pen-f and Panasonic 12-32mm, f/3.5-5.6 lens. Most were at f/5.6.

    Looking upstream with the snowcapped Owyhee Mountains in the background.
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    Looking downstream from Swan Falls Dam
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    My wife and uncooperative dog on the trail along the river.
    20190127-_1270011.jpg
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    These rocks, many the size of pick-up trucks and some the size of small houses, were carried by the flood waters and deposited as the velocity of the flow slowed.
    20190127-_1270035.jpg
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    Having lunch among the many rocks. Another sign of climate change, my wife in a T-shirt in January.
    20190127-_1270041-Edit.jpg
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    Looking down stream from a high point. Remember some of those rocks are big as a house.
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    Looking upstream. It is these high canyon walls that provide the prime nesting habitat for birds of prey.
    20190127-_1270045.jpg
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    Flood rocks and the canyon wall.
    20190127-_1270052.jpg
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    Rocks, river, and canyon wall.
    20190127-_1270054.jpg
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    Canyon wall several hundred feet high.
    20190127-_1270057.jpg
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    Snake River and willows.
    20190127-_1270059.jpg
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    There are several old rock structure dating from the 1920's 1930's that are along the river as well as early hydro electric efforts. Most are in ruin, this one has likely been restored at some point over time. Several wood rats call this place home.
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    Looking out from the inside.
    20190127-_1270029.jpg
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  2. Andrewmap

    Andrewmap Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    798
    Jun 5, 2018
    Derby, United Kingdom
    Martin
    Great set of images, thanks for sharing!
     
  3. retiredfromlife

    retiredfromlife Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 15, 2016
    Sydney, Australia
    A nice set of images, looks hot and dry even with the water.
     
  4. AaronE

    AaronE Mu-43 Veteran

    472
    May 23, 2013
    Idaho
    Very hot and dry in the middle of summer also lots of rattle snakes then.
     
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