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Sloppy user or overly eager AF on the E-P5?

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by taz98spin, Apr 30, 2014.

  1. taz98spin

    taz98spin Mu-43 Top Veteran

    843
    May 13, 2011
    NYC
    Hey everybody,

    I'm at work.. but since the weather is horrible here in NYC, I knew that a lot of my patients were going to cancel (no-show) today.
    I brought along my personal laptop to edit photos from the weekend from Central Park. Weekend was sunny and nice!

    So I started editing right after lunch and I am shocked to see so many mis-focused images. Almost a ratio of 4 in 1 shots are not in focus :mad:
    From the thumbnail view, the images look great, but once opened in PS, even viewed at 25% you can tell the images are not in focus.
    However, every shot I took, I got a green focus box to focus on my wife's face. Some even using the Face Detect.

    I'm pretty sure these are not shutter shock images, because they images are not in the danger zone, but in the 1/3200 range.

    I know the best way is to upload the images, so you all can see too, but there is no wifi access here and I don't have a jump drive.
    I'll post them this evening once I get home but in the mean time..

    My question is, since the AF is blazing fast on the E-P5,and other Olympus cameras', does it sometimes say it's in focus when it's not?
    As in being overly eager?

    I'm trying to figure out if it's bad technique (but I don't have this issue with my Fuji gear) or if it's the camera.

    Thanks for the help!

    Edit: photos added

    Not in focus

    13890215027_642c9c7501_b. Bad Focus by Taz Spin, on Flickr

    14096878213_da20a31658_b. Bad Focus by Taz Spin, on Flickr

    Same setting with camera but in focus

    14077339474_28ee46c80e_b. Rena in focus by Taz Spin, on Flickr

    14096915383_4e4070668c_b. Rena in focus by Taz Spin, on Flickr
     
  2. drd1135

    drd1135 Zen Snapshooter

    Mar 17, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Steve
    Could you post a few of the offending images? It's hard to even guess without looking.
     
  3. taz98spin

    taz98spin Mu-43 Top Veteran

    843
    May 13, 2011
    NYC
    I will when I get home.
    However, has any user gotten an image that the camera said that it was in focus, but it actually wasn't?

    To think about it, I don't think I've actually seen my E-P5 not focus on an object or subject. :confused:
     
  4. Yes, but it the rare instances that it happens the misfocus is very obvious on the rear screen and I can try again (and I'm not specifically talking about my E-P5 here).
     
  5. taz98spin

    taz98spin Mu-43 Top Veteran

    843
    May 13, 2011
    NYC
    My mis-focuses were not obvious on the rear screen though. :frown:
     
  6. peter124

    peter124 Mu-43 Regular

    There is a setting which allows exposure even if correct focus hasn't been detected. Could that be the problem?
     
  7. taz98spin

    taz98spin Mu-43 Top Veteran

    843
    May 13, 2011
    NYC
    Oh, I didn't know that! I will have to look through my camera settings once I get home.

    But like I mentioned, I had the green box show up on every single shot I took.
     
  8. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    Never had any issues with my E-P5. One thing that has caught me before though is that if you have the green magnify focus box enabled, then this takes priority over face detect. So, if, for example, the green box is off to the left but the camera picks up a face in the centre, then when you focus, it's easy to think it's focussed on the face (it's got a white box around it, right?) - but it's actually the green square that the camera has used.
     
  9. bikerhiker

    bikerhiker Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 24, 2013
    Canada
    David
    Did you choose "small" AF target in the AF home settings? The mis-focus I presume is due to the overly large AF target box which is mis-focusing some. I get that too only if I'm shooting wide open. The fix is to use the magnify button located under the 2x2 lever and it will switch from a big AF box to a smaller one assuming you did not assign that button to do something else. To switch to an even smaller one for mission critical stuff, just press it again and you will have about 800 AF points to choose from.

    In regards to the face priority; use the left or right eye priority -- it's a bit more accurate than just the face if you're shooting wide open.
     
  10. taz98spin

    taz98spin Mu-43 Top Veteran

    843
    May 13, 2011
    NYC
  11. taz98spin

    taz98spin Mu-43 Top Veteran

    843
    May 13, 2011
    NYC
    Yes, my focus point is on the smallest settings.
     
  12. taz98spin

    taz98spin Mu-43 Top Veteran

    843
    May 13, 2011
    NYC
    That might be the reason..!
    But I usually always take 2 photos in the same location, and I didn't change my camera settings, and I captured these images. (These have been edited to remove my wife's blemishes) and they are in focus. :confused:

    14096915383_4e4070668c_b. Rena in focus by Taz Spin, on Flickr

    14077339474_28ee46c80e_b. Rena in focus by Taz Spin, on Flickr
     
  13. bikerhiker

    bikerhiker Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 24, 2013
    Canada
    David
    Did you activate it by pressing the magnify button once? It will change from a large AF box to a much smaller AF box. By pressing the magnify button again, it will change to even smaller box; up to 800 points. I find the normal AF green box inadequate for accurate focusing even if face priority is disengaged.
     
  14. taz98spin

    taz98spin Mu-43 Top Veteran

    843
    May 13, 2011
    NYC
    I did that the first time I set the camera up. I'll have to re-check my camera's AF box.
     
  15. st3amco0ker

    st3amco0ker Mu-43 Rookie

    21
    Feb 7, 2012
    I have the same problem, that's why I shoot 4-5 of the same shots just so maybe I'm lucky to get 2-3 that are tack sharp.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. taz98spin

    taz98spin Mu-43 Top Veteran

    843
    May 13, 2011
    NYC
    Thanks for the reply!
    Glad to know that I'm not the only one!
     
  17. Is it happening with all lenses, or just one?
     
  18. bikerhiker

    bikerhiker Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 24, 2013
    Canada
    David
    With a 3.7 micron pixel pitch 16Mp sensor, you will be facing 2 problems. Camera movement and focus placement. Camera movement should not exceed more than 3.7 micron (that's pretty hard to do) and with a 3.7 micron pixel pitch, your AF focus deviation should also not deviate from 5 microns! The less the better. Currently, the E-P5's IBIS is incapable of counteracting this movement. In fact, the Power OIS on the Panasonic lens is better in doing this. I'm not the only one that has this experience. This is different than say a D3 with a 8.5 micron pixel pitch which can afford a lax inaccuracy of plus or minus 10 microns. Nikon's AF fine tune allows up to plus or minus 20 microns. So yes, even me, I have to shoot a few times to get good keepers, which is why a larger sensor with a larger pixel pitch is easier to be slightly sloppy than a smaller sensor like our MFT. This is the same reason why it is also so difficult to get tack sharp images with a Nikon D800 or the Sony A7r unless you know how to maintain good AF accuracy as well as good hand holding skills.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  19. taz98spin

    taz98spin Mu-43 Top Veteran

    843
    May 13, 2011
    NYC
    Mostly with the Olympus 25/1.8 lens.

    This past weekend had a studio session and it happened during the session too. But this time, it was noticeable even on the rear LCD.

    I would post the image here too, but the model is in her lingerie, so it goes against the forum policy..
    but I have 4 images that are not in focus, even though the camera's green box said I was in focus.
     
  20. Mattr

    Mattr Mu-43 Regular

    62
    Aug 5, 2013
    Melbourne, Australia
    Matt Robinson
    But those Daffs and the rocks are tack sharp! That's where your camera focussed, or at least on a distance around there. When this happened in the studio setting was the model weraing reflective glasses or something? Focussing on reflections can sometimes throw out an AF system because the image in the reflection "appears" to be further away than the reflective surface actually is. If those Daffs are approximately the same distance behind your wife as you were infront of her, I'd say your camera has been fooled into setting a focal distance based on your reflection in her sunnies. "cos your feet look pretty sharp in those glasses.

    The solution, make sure you focus on the glasses frame, not where her eye woul be behind them. I'd guess in the second shot your camera picked up the frame or another "real" image and focussed on what you wanted.
     
    • Like Like x 3