Skip O45 and go for O60mm2.8 macro?

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by thomastaesu, Nov 25, 2012.

  1. thomastaesu

    thomastaesu Mu-43 Regular

    169
    Nov 16, 2012
    ATL, GA
    Thomas
    I am getting OM-D 14-150mm and 25mm. (I need AF f1.4 lens!)

    I was going to save up for O45mm next but one of the reasons I am getting OM-D is b/c it is weather sealed, and I do not have any weather sealed lenses.

    So, I am thinking about getting 60mm macro for my portrait/bad weather lens instead of 45mm.

    What do you think?
     
  2. tdekany

    tdekany Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 8, 2011
    Oregon
    That is what I did, plus wanted real Macro as well.

    The lens is very sharp.
     
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  3. thomastaesu

    thomastaesu Mu-43 Regular

    169
    Nov 16, 2012
    ATL, GA
    Thomas
    How's AF speed for macro use and non-macro use?
     
  4. tdekany

    tdekany Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 8, 2011
    Oregon
    F>A>S>T> :biggrin:
     
  5. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Sounds like a plan to me. A 25mm f/1.4 and 60mm f/2.8 will be a good pair. A decent spread in focal lengths and you'll have your fast lens, macro lens, and weather sealed lens.
     
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  6. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    The 60mm Macro is on my short list! I am looking at it from a different perspective but from all I have read this lens is a winner.

    For me it will be the longest of a trinity consisting of the Pan. 14mm f2.5, Sigma 30mm f2.8 and then this 60mm at the top. I really don't need super fast but I would use the macro a fair amount.

    Robin Wong did a good 3 part review of this lens that I found very useful.

    http://robinwong.blogspot.com/2012/09/olympus-mzuiko-60mm-f28-macro-lens.html

    http://robinwong.blogspot.com/2012/09/olympus-mzuiko-60mm-f28-macro-review.html

    http://robinwong.blogspot.com/2012/09/olympus-mzuiko-60mm-f28-macro-review_23.html
     
  7. khollister

    khollister Mu-43 Veteran

    259
    Sep 16, 2010
    Orlando, FL
    Keith
    I own both. The AF on the 60 is definitely not as fast as the 45 although it is probably good enough. You also will not get quite as much selective focus with f/2.8 vs f/1.8 even with the increased focal length.

    The 60 is a very good lens, although my impression is (haven't done any real testing yet) the 75 (definitely) and 45 (maybe) are a little sharper than the 60 at non-macro distances. The 60 is razor sharp at close distances.

    I also think I would be far more likely to be shooting landscapes/cityscapes/street in poor weather, and the 60mm focal length would not be my weapon of choice for that.

    The 60 is a very nice lens though, especially for the price. Its biggest strength is macro IMHO though.
     
  8. thomastaesu

    thomastaesu Mu-43 Regular

    169
    Nov 16, 2012
    ATL, GA
    Thomas
    So, you think i should get that slow 12-50 or expensive 12-35 for weather sealed lens?? *gasp*
     
  9. cookme

    cookme Mu-43 Regular

    139
    May 25, 2012
    I think those were the keywords you can base your purchase decision on. Some people find the 12-50 perfectly usable, and some can afford the faster 12-35 and not care about the small bit of extra zoom.
     
  10. khollister

    khollister Mu-43 Veteran

    259
    Sep 16, 2010
    Orlando, FL
    Keith
    The 12-50 is slow, but is reasonable sharp at the wide end and in semi-macro mode. It is soft at the longer focal lengths at normal subject distances. For me personally, I am fine with the 12-50 as a weather sealed lens since I am most likely to use it at the wide end in poor weather.

    If 60mm is a focal length you would primarily use in poor weather, then the macro lens is a great solution for you.

    Like most things, there is no perfect solution.
     
  11. danska

    danska Mu-43 Top Veteran

    945
    May 21, 2012
    Portland, OR
    Joe
    I like the 60mm as a portrait lens. It works very well for that purpose. I don't find the 45mm nearly as sharp, which actually can be beneficial for portraits. The weather-sealing works nicely.
     
  12. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    There is a cool trick for weatherproofing just a lens used in AF mode. Use a plastic bag and attach it to the lens end via gaffers tape to the hood or screw it down with a clear filter{or other filter if using one for correction}. Then put gaffers tape on the other end where it mounts to the body. Since the E-M5 is weather sealed you don't have to worry about the body.

    Here is a pic that I found on another forum.
    72392734.IrKAcOrF.IMGP9205.
    Note that the user of this Pentax used duct tape - DON'T! spend the extra few bucks and get gaffers tape as it will not leave the nasty residue that duct tape will.
     
  13. hkpzee

    hkpzee Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 5, 2011
    Hong Kong
    Patrick
    I would also opt for the 60/2.8 Macro over the 45/1.8. I have both lenses, and prefer the 60 over the 45. I personally find the 45 to be an odd focal length. A bit too long for indoor use (I live in a crowded city though), and not long enough for outdoor portraits. Besides, as someone else has mentioned, the 60 is a sharper lens, can double as macro and portrait lenses, and is weather-sealed. I just find it to be more versatile than the 45. Just like my 20/1.7, which hasn't been used since I got the PL25, the 45/1.8 has been sitting in my cabinet since I got the 60/2.8.
     
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  14. m43dex

    m43dex Mu-43 Veteran

    242
    Mar 5, 2011
    Michigan
    Funny ... I have both as well. I love the 45mm FOV for portraits. I find the 60mm to long for most indoor use. My 60mm sits until I go outside. My 20mm is also gone and I have high hopes for the 17mm 1.8.
     
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  15. hankbaskett

    hankbaskett Mu-43 Regular

    155
    Aug 21, 2012
    I have the 45, 60 and 75. The 45 is best for indoor portraits, 60 for macro, 75 for outdoor portraits. IMO, combining any of those uses is a compromise, although if you could make a case for anything, it would be using the 60 for outdoor portraits, as you're mostly sacrificing depth of field, where f/2.8 is a little slow to be used in a lot of indoor portrait situations, so not a great replacement for the 45.

    That 75 is a special lens though, if you can swing it, I don't think you'll be reaching for the 60 for much outside of macros.
     
  16. danska

    danska Mu-43 Top Veteran

    945
    May 21, 2012
    Portland, OR
    Joe
    The 60mm is by no means a good indoor lens. I prefer a longer reach than the 45mm outside, and the 60mm feels right. I rented the 75mm and while I was really impressed by it, I found that it was too long for most things. The results from it are really special by ever means. $900 was just too much for me to drop after just getting this system earlier this year (and buying a bunch of pricey glass). $500 was a much easier pill to swallow when you get multiple uses out of a lens.

    One thing I've found when using longer lenses in portrait use is that you need to stop down to around f/2.8 anyways to get more than one face in focus when shooting couples or groups.