Sigma 17-70 contemporary adapted on M43

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by MohoWu, Jan 10, 2018 at 8:05 AM.

  1. MohoWu

    MohoWu Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Nov 18, 2017
    Has anyone tried adapting the Sigma 17-70 contemporary on any M43 camera using metabone speedbooster ultra? It seems to be a pretty good combo that none of the native lenses offers, but I haven't found any discussion about it. It is because the metabone speedbooster is generally bad in autofocusing with Sigma lenses?
     
  2. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    I unfortunately don't have any experience with the lens, but when mounted on a speedbooster it would act as a 12-50mm f/2-2.8, with the added bonus of being a maco lens as well. Could make for a very versatile combo for around $900-1,000.

    I'm not certain how it would AF though unfortunately. I know that @Reflector@Reflector has the 18-35 & 50-100 Sigma 1.8's on a speedbooster, however I believe he's using an E-M1 as well, which may be required due to its PDAF points. Maybe he can chime in with more details about how the Sigma lenses function on a speedbooster.
     
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  3. MohoWu

    MohoWu Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Nov 18, 2017
    Does it matter if the camera has PDAF or not? I can't think of a reason why contrast detection won't work as long as the camera can communicate with the lens.
     
  4. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    It does matter, depending on whether or not the lens was designed for a PDAF or CDAF focusing system.

    This is why the majority of 4/3 lenses don’t work (or don’t work well) on m43 bodies other than the E-M1 series, because they lack PDAF.
     
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  5. Reflector

    Reflector Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 31, 2013
    In regards to PDAF vs CDAF
    The E-M1/E-M1II will drive the lens somewhat like it will on a (Canon) DSLR if you buy the EF flavor of Speedbooster Ultra. I have the E-M1II so my experience will be different from E-M1 owners. The E-M1II in S-AF mode will drive the lens with PDAF for the first move and then do what appears to be the CDAF shuffle (sometimes) at the end when it is about to hit focus. You'll notice it in that it shifts the focus plane back and forth some tiny amount (~#mm or less than 1/4", for lenses focused at a short range) in a single motion before it confirms focus. In C-AF, it will behave very much like it does on a DSLR, where it will pull focus in a single motion. Sometimes it will do a bit of correction even in C-AF, but that's when you're waiting for the green dot to indicate focus. I find that really only occurs when there's low contrast and very, very low light. Think "dark room barely illuminated by light."

    Also don't try to play with C-AF too much, if it loses focus then immediately release whatever you are doing and have it reacquire or it will keep floating out of focus which is a behavior with the Speedbooster Ultra as of this post. With the E-M1II it doesn't play well as of the current firmware. I heard that the E-M1 does better in that regard.

    Sometimes using S-AF does not play very well with some lenses with particularly slow focusing motors like the Tamron 60mm f/2 as they don't like the CDAF shuffle.


    My CDAF body is an E-M5 and from limited experience if you have a lens with a very fast motor it will behave fairly well (S-AF, don't even think about C-AF). It will do a long throw CDAF shuffle wherein the lens will rapidly adjust focus and then overshoot focus before it comes back around and hits focus. The Sigma 50-100 f/1.8A appears very reliable. I have to yet to convert my Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8A to EF mount, so right now it is attached to a Nikon F to Canon EF adapter.

    There's a lot of videos with the GH5 with the Speedbooster Ultra and it appears to handle CDAF a lot better than my E-M5 does, probably because of DFD.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018 at 1:37 PM
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  6. MohoWu

    MohoWu Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Nov 18, 2017
    Thanks for sharing. Sounds promising. I use G80 body. I'm not expecting any CAF. The main reason that I'm considering the speedbooster is I want better control of depth of field in still photography. Hope it can fulfill my need in that respect.
     
  7. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    If you want better control over DoF, and you're using adapter glass from APS-C or FF cameras, why not just use the native camera? IMO, it seems a bit crazy to use larger, non-native glass just to chase shallow DoF when you can achieve that with a larger sensor camera in the first place.
     
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  8. MohoWu

    MohoWu Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Nov 18, 2017
    I've been through the DSLR route. They are just too bulky and heavy for travelling, even though I came from a relatively small DSLR Pentax k5 iis before moving on to the G80. For causal shots, I envisage I would just use the native lenses. But I'd also like to have one or two very fast lenses in my pocket if I happen to go to a concert or want to shoot some portrait sometime.
     
  9. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    So do you currently own an EF-mount lenses, or would you be buying EF-mount lenses strictly to use on the SpeedBooster?
     
  10. MohoWu

    MohoWu Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Nov 18, 2017
    No, I don't have any EF lenses. I know it sounds crazy to buy a lens from another system and relying on a third party adaptor to make it work. That's why I'm also arguing with myself whether I should really do it.
     
  11. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    I think you'll find that the difference in DOF between 12-50/f2-2.8 vs. a native 12-40mm/f2.8 zoom is going to be very, very small.

    In order to see a real difference with DOF, I find that you need to use primes. That is also the case with APS-C cameras unless you use Sigma's f1.8 zooms. f2.8-4 on APS-C can give shallow DOF only if you focus very close on the subject (which you can do with f2.8 on M4/3, as well, I might add).

    If you want shallow DOF from a standard (not telephoto) zoom, you really need to be looking at FF. An f/4 zoom on an FF camera has shallower DoF than f2.8 on APS-C, and f2.8 on FF is f1.8 on APS-C.
     
  12. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    I'm not going to get in to telling how somebody should spend their money, but buying non-native mount lenses just to put them on a speedbooster is a crazy proposition IMO. As Turbofrog said, you'd likely be better off with the 12-40 f/2.8, especially considering ones can be picked up for nearly half the price of a speedbooster and Sigma 17-70.

    But at the end of the day it's your money, so if you want to spend it buy larger non-native glass, it's your prerogative to do so. Make sure to post samples over in the sample image thread once you get whatever lenses you're looking at.
     
  13. TNcasual

    TNcasual Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Dec 2, 2014
    Knoxville, TN
    I can see the argument for the Sigma 1.8 zooms + speedbooster on mft. The 17-70 doesn't quite have that advantage of really fast glass, though. The mft pro zooms or a set of great primes would be more convenient, in my opinion.
     
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  14. Christop82

    Christop82 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    542
    Sep 10, 2016
    I think their are exceptions to the rule. Pairing a metabones speedbooster with an Ef 50 1.8 stm cost about $500. It gets you a very sharp 34mm f1.3 with silent accurate AF. F1.3 is what the camera reads, but in actual use I think it’s closer to f1.1. AF is not as fast as native, but close to the slower native lenses. It’s also not much if any bigger than a native f1.4 prime. Now you have a fast 34mm prime as well as the ability to speed up any EF mount lens for around $500.
     
  15. MohoWu

    MohoWu Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Nov 18, 2017
    You read my mind. Ef 50 1.8 and 85 1.8 will be the first two lenses I'll consider if I get the metabone speedbooster. I think many APSC lenses won't be too big for the G80 body too. However, it's frustrating that all the EF-S lenses can't be mounted on the metabone adaptor. That also makes me wonder if I should consider Nikon to M43 adaptor, but there're fewer reviews on the performances of Nikon lenses on M43 than the Canon lenses.
     
  16. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Legend

    f2-2.8 is no better what the cheap and tiny m4/3 primes offer, and most of them are in the 12-50 range that the adapted Sigma would offer. Putting a $400 lens on a $500 adapter and you'd spent enough to buy some nice fast native m4/3 primes. F2 doesn't really offer much DOF control at the wide end on 4/3 anyway, so if you want a zoom, just get the native 12-40 or 12-35mm f2.8, IMO. Native f2.8 beats horrid slow focusing and massive f2-2.8.
     
  17. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    A sigma 30mm f/1.4 costs $340, and is a native mount lens.

    You do raise a point that once you have the MBSB, you can use it with other lenses, but that typically makes more sense for someone with an existing catalog of lenses. To buy a SB, as well as a slew of non-native mount lenses is a bit crazy IMO, unless it's something where there's nothing close in the native lens mount (like a SB'd Sigma 18-35 f/1.8 and 50-100 f/1.8, giving you a 13-25 f/1.2 and 35-70 f/1.2).
     
  18. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Legend

    But it's now a weird-ish focal length on m4/3 at 68mm equivalent, and you don't actually get any more bg blur than a 45mm f1.8, because now it's wider. I guess if you are bumping up against ISO ceiling in the dark or something, then it saves you a stop there, but that's also where non-native lenses are going to struggle to focus.
     
  19. Christop82

    Christop82 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    542
    Sep 10, 2016
    The Sigma is a bargain at around $250 used, but I like the extra light I can achieve with the Speedbooster. The natives are great if you can afford the best ones, but Canon 1.8 primes are relatively cheap and turn into f1. 3 low light beasts. Indoor natural shots are what I shoot mostly. I find the Speedbooster extremely helpful in this area.
     
  20. TNcasual

    TNcasual Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Dec 2, 2014
    Knoxville, TN
    It seems that you are chasing fast glass. Is that for low light? DOF?

    Your answer would help others help you with your pursuit?