Shutter speeds for video

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by 012abc, Jul 17, 2017.

  1. 012abc

    012abc Mu-43 Regular

    27
    Jul 1, 2017
    I understand that the general rule for general scene is you shutter speed should be double your fps. So if you are shooting at 24 fps, the ideal shutter speed is 1/48.

    Are there any time or any specific scene where it's not a bad idea, and is actually prefer to make your shutter speed faster than double your fps? So if your fps is 24, you would shoot at something like 1/200.

    I'm trying to shoot some naturescape scenery at 24 fps. There's hardly any movement in the scene except when there's wind (tree branches would be blowing left and right), or if I'm shooting a river or waterfall. To simplify it further, I will not be panning. Would shooting these scene at a high (1/200, or 1/500, etc...) shutter speed make the scene looks worse, or less natural than shooting at 1/48 or 1/50?

    I'm trying to not rely on variable nd filters. Since these have an adverse affect on wide and ultra wides focal length.

    Thanks.

    Edit: This is for video.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2017
  2. Aperture Don

    Aperture Don Mu-43 Regular

    109
    Jan 7, 2017
    Illinois
    I don't know where you heard or read that, but it is not correct. If it was correct, then if you were shooting at 3 fps, the shutter speed would be 1/6 of a second - clearly too slow for almost any situation. The rule of thumb that I believe you are trying to quote is that your shutter speed should be at least the inverse of the focal length of your lens, i.e. if you were using a 100mm lens, then your shutter speed should be at least 1/100. Most photographers wouldn't be using 24 fps unless they were shooting action photos. Clearly 1/48 is too slow for most action.

    Although the rule of thumb is recited often, it is just that - a rule of thumb. I generally try to shoot much faster than that unless I'm trying to get the effects of a slower shutter speed or the light just will not permit a faster shutter speed.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2017
  3. hans.aambo

    hans.aambo Mu-43 Regular

    45
    Apr 25, 2016
    Oslo
    Hans Martin Aambø
    I expect that you talk about video, if not then just overlook the following.

    I am not an expert, but what you describe would be a 180° shutter angle. This links explains a bit more. Shutter Angles & Creative Control

    I am no expert, but others here might know more about when you might use 90° or 45°.
     
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  4. 012abc

    012abc Mu-43 Regular

    27
    Jul 1, 2017
    I apologize for not clarifying. This question is for video.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2017
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  5. hans.aambo

    hans.aambo Mu-43 Regular

    45
    Apr 25, 2016
    Oslo
    Hans Martin Aambø
    I guessed so! Found another article with both a clearifying animation and some thoughts about how to use it. With quotes from Steven Spielberg himself! :2thumbs:

    45 degree shutter in Saving Private Ryan

    There is also a reference to David Slade in the comments section. There are plenty of clips of his movies and music videos online, and quite a few with this staccato effect.

    I hope these answers some of your questions as well! I guess using shorter shutter speeds depends on the "look" you want. And great masters use it when they need the effect!

    For landscapes, I would imagine it gives a very crisp and clear image, almost hyper realistic, but less "cinematic" and certainly not dreamy.
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  6. 012abc

    012abc Mu-43 Regular

    27
    Jul 1, 2017
    Thanks again.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler Subscribing Member

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Hi, short shutters in action video give me a serious headache sometimes.
    Especially in The Gladiator, but Private Ryan bothered me as well.

    Barry