Show your Old Cameras

Erich_H

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Erich_H - You are correct about the lens being interchangeable; I've owned this old camera for years and never realized it had interchangeable lenses. Mine is fitted with the 35 mm f/2.7 Tricor and it does unscrew just as the >>> manual <<< I just found and read describes! This publication also mentions a telescopic viewfinder that can fit on the second accessory shoe near the normal viewfinder. They also offered an extinction-type exposure meter to fit in this shoe! The central accessory shoe was a "hot shoe" with flash synch contact of which they were very proud.

One thing puzzles me, however. The lens unscrews from the focussing thread mount with its engraved zone focus distance chart. This implies the same rotational focus position (and lens mount to film plane) versus subject distance would be the same for 35, 75 and 125 mm lenses. I don't think this would work! The focus scale appears to be retained by three small flat head screws, but I doubt the maker would want a user changing the plate with a lens swap and there is no mention of such in these instructions.
I'm also thinking that the "interchangeable lens" might just be the front element, just like on my Contaflex Beta?

https://www.mu-43.com/threads/what-photography-related-item-did-you-buy-this-week.51684/post-1409430

When I read the manual real quick, I must admit that I didn't see any information about unmounting the lens. There's only the mentioning of "interchangeable lens" that I could see.

I then downloaded some period photography catalogues (Central Camera / Peerless / Montgomery Ward / Sears). Couldn't find any price for the 75/125 lenses. The camera was quoted with prices for the three different standard lenses (3.5/2.7/2.0) in one of the above. Can't remember which.

And I also found that Sears sold the Asahiflex as Tower 23/24 in 1956. My Asahiflex (Tower 24) with the f:2.4/58 mm was $98.50!

I love the old catalogues!
 
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Panolyman

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Ansco imported cameras built by Agfa in Germany and sold them in the USA. The simple folding lens (fixed) 35 mm viewfinder only Regent was sold here circa 1953 to 1960. In Europe, Agfa sold the same camera as its Solinette II. A companion rangefinder model was sold as the Ansco Super Regent and in Europe as the Agfa Super Solinette. Rigid lens versions were sold as the Ansco Memar and Super Memar.

The Regent had a three element Agfa Apotar lens in a Prontor-SV shutter (1s to 1/300) with X and M class flash synchronization. The lens was surrounded by a ridged focusing ring and had a zone-focus scale on its barrel. The film transport was via the right-hand knob and the shutter had to be manually cocked before you could advance to the next frame. Number 5 filters (in an adaptor ring) could be used, but had to be removed to fold the lens standard.

View attachment 845013
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Beautiful camera and gorgeous looking lens.
Why does it have what appear to be two shutter release buttons?
 

docfox

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The button my finger is resting on opens the lens standard. The other is the shutter release.
opening LoRes.jpg
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docfox

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The American Leica?
capped LoRes.jpg
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Argus Camera, Incorporated of Ann Arbor Michigan introduced the Argus C3 (its third camera) in 1939. From 1939 until 1966 it sold some 2 million of them! The "Brick" was a simple and inexpensive camera built with a cast Bakelite body trimmed with cast metal frames. (Argus was incorporated to make radios; theirs had Bakelite cases.) It used the Eastman 35 mm film cartridge and had thread-mounted interchangeable lenses in front of a three-bladed leaf shutter. The standard lens was a 50 mm f/3.5 Cintar by Baush & Lomb. A 100 mm f/4.5 tele and 35 mm f/4.5 wide angle were offered.

Using the camera was a bit laborious. You would press and hold the film-catch button (behind the frame counter) and wind the advance knob on the top-left counter-clockwise for 1/4 turn. Then you released the film-catch and continued turning until the knob stopped. You estimated or measured the required exposure (using a separate exposure meter) and set the required f/stop on the lens ring and the shutter speed on the front-right shutter speed dial. Then you pressed the lever on the front of the camera down to cock the shutter. Next, you looked through the right-hand eyepiece and used a finger to rotate the range-finder gear until two split images were aligned. (Don't let your other fingers block the range finding window at the gear's center!) Then you moved your eye to the left-hand eyepiece to frame. After iterating the frame/range viewing, you depressed the top mounted shutter release taking a picture.

The rewind knob was at the bottom right of the camera; there was no rewind button.The tripod socket was in a matching fixed boss at the left end of the bottom. Changing lenses involved removing the idler gear between the lens and the rangefinder gear. The flash-sync terminals were on the left side of the body, in front of the back release. The small round disk in front of the accessory shoe could be removed with a spanner to expose two screws that adjusted the range finder.

>>> Click here to read the manual <<<

facing right LoRes.jpg
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facing left LoRes.jpg
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ex machina

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The American Leica?
View attachment 845182

Argus Camera, Incorporated of Ann Arbor Michigan introduced the Argus C3 (its third camera) in 1939. From 1939 until 1966 it sold some 2 million of them! The "Brick" was a simple and inexpensive camera built with a cast Bakelite body trimmed with cast metal frames. (Argus was incorporated to make radios in Bakelite cases.) It used the Eastman 35 mm film cartridge and had thread-mounted interchangeable lenses in front of a three-bladed leaf shutter. The standard lens was a 50 mm f/3.5 Cintar by Baush & Lomb. A 100 mm f/4.5 tele and 35 mm f/4.5 wide angle were offered.

Using the camera was a bit laborious. You would press and hold the film-catch button (behind the frame counter) and wind the advance knob on the top-left counter-clockwise for 1/4 turn. Then you released the film-catch and continued turning until the knob stopped. You estimated or measured (using a separate exposure meter) the required exposure and set the required f/stop on the lens ring and the shutter speed on the top-right shutter speed dial. Then you pressed the lever on the front of the camera down to cock the shutter. Next, you looked through the right-hand eyepiece and used a finger to rotate the range-finder gear until two split images were aligned. (Don't let your other fingers block the range finding window at the gear's center!) Then you moved your eye to the left-hand eyepiece to frame. After iterating the frame/range viewing, you depressed the top mounted shutter release taking a picture.

The rewind knob was at the bottom right of the camera; there was no rewind button.The tripod socket was in a matching fixed boss at the left end of the bottom. Changing lenses involved removing the idler gear between the lens and the rangefinder gear. The flash-sync terminals were on the left side of the body, in front of the back release. The small round disk in front of the accessory shoe could be removed with a spanner to expose two screws that adjusted the range finder.

>>> Click here to read the manual <<<

View attachment 845183
View attachment 845184

The lens on this guy is surprisingly good and can be adapted to m43 with DIY or commercially available options.
 
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Curt Schimmels
In 1945 Universal Camera Company introduced the Mercury II (CX) to replace its prewar Mercury, a leather covered cast aluminum half-frame camera featuring a rotary shutter (T, B, 1/20 to 1/1000). The post-war Mercury II was slightly larger, was cast from an (easily dulled) aluminum/magnesium alloy and covered with a synthetic leather. Most importantly, it used standard Eastman 35 mm cartridges instead of the Univex #200 of its predecessor (and thus had a rewind knob).

>>> click here to read the manual <<<

Thank you so much for this post! The information is really helpful to me, as I have this camera.It was my father's that he bought at the end of WW2 that he took with him to Italy while in the service. Here's a link to my post about it.

https://www.mu-43.com/threads/show-your-old-cameras.10938/page-41#post-1066843
 

docfox

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Hatfield, Pennsylvania, USA
The Voigtlander Vitessa was a high-quality 35 mm camera with a unique folding lens standard. The bellows-mounted fixed lens hid behind two vertically hinged doors. The film was advanced by a unique plunger falling under the left index finger. The camera illustrated here is an "A version 5" Vitessa built about 1956; my uncle was its original owner.
with instructions LoRes.jpg
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The camera was clearly designed to be carried in a jacket pocket. It was compact but heavy and extremely well built.
in-hand LoRes.jpg
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Depressing the release button (also used to take a picture) opened the lens doors and raised the advance plunger. My thumb is positioned to slow the spring-driven plunger release.
Opening LoRes.jpg
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A frame counter window is on the front of the camera. The distance scale (with depth of field guides) is on the top between the shutter/door release and the accessory shoe.
front LoRes.jpg
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The lens is a 50 mm f/3.5 Color-Skopar, a four element (Tessar type) type designed and made by Voigtlander. It is mounted in a Synchro-Compur shutter with speeds 1-1/500s plus B. The MXV synchronized flash connector is on the left lens door. The lens aperture and shutter speed settings are coupled to provide "constant EV" setting. The shutter is automatically set by the film advance plunger. The camera is well designed for rapid operation to follow action.
lens LoRes.jpg
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The lens is closed by squeezing it against the camera's back as shown below. Once the doors are closed, push the plunger down to its storage position where it will lock.
closing LoRes.jpg
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The back of the camera has a single eyepiece for the rangefinder/viewfinder. The wheel to the right of it is the focus control.
back LoRes.jpg
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(Left-to-right) the bottom plate has a tripod socket, the rewind release button, the bottom/back latch and the folding rewind lever.
bottom locked LoRes.jpg
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Lifting the bottom/back latch key and turning it counter-clockwise allows the back and bottom to be pulled down and off the body.

bottom & back off LoRes.jpg
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Film loading is simple and conventional (Leica lovers please note the wide-open space!)
back off LoRes.jpg
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The Vitessa was a high quality folding-lens 35 mm entry comparable in every sense to the Kodak Retina offerings.

>>> click here to read the manual <<<
 
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ex machina

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The Voigtlander Vitessa was a high-quality 35 mm camera with a unique folding lens standard. The bellows-mounted fixed lens hid behind two vertically hinged doors. The film was advanced by a unique plunger falling under the left index finger. The camera illustrated here is an "A version 5" Vitessa built about 1956; my uncle was its original owner.
View attachment 845394

The camera was clearly designed to be carried in a jacket pocket. It was compact but heavy and extremely well built.
View attachment 845395

Depressing the release button (also used to take a picture) opened the lens doors and raised the advance plunger. My thumb is positioned to slow the spring-driven plunger release.
View attachment 845396

A frame counter window is on the front of the camera. The distance scale (with depth of field guides) is on the top between the shutter/door release and the accessory shoe.
View attachment 845397

The lens is a 50 mm f/3.5 Color-Skopar, a four element (Tessar type) type designed and made by Voigtlander. It is mounted in a Synchro-Compur shutter with speeds 1-1/500s plus B. The MXV synchronized flash connector is on the left lens door. The lens aperture and shutter speed settings are coupled to provide "constant EV" setting. The shutter is automatically set by the film advance plunger. The camera is well designed for rapid operation to follow action.
View attachment 845398

The lens is closed by squeezing it against the camera's back as shown below. Once the doors are closed, push the plunger down to its storage position where it will lock.
View attachment 845399

The back of the camera has a single eyepiece for the rangefinder/viewfinder. The wheel to the right of it is the focus control.
View attachment 845403

(Left-to-right) the bottom plate has a tripod socket, the rewind release button, the bottom/back latch and the folding rewind lever.
View attachment 845400

Lifting the bottom/back latch key and turning it counter-clockwise allows the back and bottom to be pulled down and off the body.

View attachment 845401

Film loading is simple and conventional (Leica lovers please note the wide-open space!)
View attachment 845404

The Vitessa was a high quality folding-lens 35 mm entry comparable in every sense to the Kodak Retina offerings.

>>> click here to read the manual <<<

Awesome job documenting this beautiful camera -- thanks for sharing that!
 

docfox

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From 1934 until 1969 Eastman Kodak produced finely crafted 35 mm Retina cameras at the Kodak AG Dr. Nagel Werk in Stuttgart-Wangen, Germany. Most of these were fixed-lens cameras with folding lens standards. During 1958 to 1966, two new series of non-folding Retinas were developed and marketed. These included non-folding rangefinder cameras and single lens reflexes. Our focus here is upon the second generation SLR, the Retina Reflex S.

The Retina Reflex S (type 034) was built in 1959 and 1960. Unlike its (type 025) predecessor, the S model used complete interchangeable lenses. The prior offering used a fixed rear lens element behind a leaf shutter and interchangeable front lens components. The same optical arrangement and lenses were used in the Retina IIIc rangefinder camera. While the S reflex used a leaf shutter, it was behind all of the glass elements of each lens. Further each S lens contained its own iris diaphragm. Lenses for the non-S camera had none; a single in-body diaphragm served all lenses (leading to some problems).

overview LoRes.jpg
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The Retina Reflex S had an (outermost) aperture control ring on the body surrounding the bayonet lens mount. This ring was turned by a wheel beneath the lens. The second control ring allowed selection of the shutter speed (1 - 1/500s), it was provided with two knurled tabs to turn it.
oblique no lens LoRes.jpg
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The camera had a coupled selenium-cell exposure meter and a front surface PC flash connector.
front no lens LoRes.jpg
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The top surface offered (left-to-right) a rewind knob, an accessory shoe, the frame counter, the exposure meter needle and the film sensitivity (ASA and DIN) setting dial.
top LoRes.jpg
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The bottom of the camera was typical Retina; it provided the right-handed film advance lever. The bottom had (left-to-right) two twistable tabs to expose a button to open the camera back, a lens-centered tripod socket and the film advance lever and film rewind clutch button. The wheel to select the aperture may be seen at the base of the lens mount.
bottom LoRes.jpg
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The back provided an eyepiece to view the pentaprism image which would "black" after each exposure.
back LoRes.jpg
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The back unlatches on the left side and swings open for loading.
inside LoRes.jpg
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There were 21 lenses made for the Retina Reflex S. These also fit the Retina IIIS rangefinder camera. Schneider-Krueznach produced 12 spanning 28 to 200 mm focal length. Rodenstock made 6 lenses from 30 to 135 mm. Three independent makers offered two 135 and one 200 mm telephotos. My camera came to me with the three Schneider lenses shown below: 35 mm f/2.8 Curtagon, 50 mm f/1.9 Xenon and 135 mm f/4 Xenar.
three lenses LoRes.jpg
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Retina Reflex S and Retina IIIS lenses can be fitted to your µ4/3 digital camera with commercially available adaptors. The lens mount is known as a Deckel or DKL bayonet. It was used by Voightlander and Braun as well as Kodak. Shop e-bay for a Retina DKL-to-µ4/3 adaptor.

>>> click here <<< to read the manual.
 
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Erich_H

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Oh, and when talking about useless old crap cameras:

This 8 MPix 3x optical zoom wonder was given to me by my dear sweet brother, @AJ68, as being, as I said, absolutely useless old crap.

_1000042-02.jpeg
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He couldn't remember what the heck it was called, maybe Aiwa, but the name had completely worn off.

So I rebranded it as a Commodore, with some help from a nameplate from a scrapped Commodore PC and Mr. Superglue.

Now it is a truly unique, one of a kind, 8 effective megapixel Commodore digital camera. And as all you knowledgeable guys know, the secret of using old crapcams is to embrace the crappiness.

So, I've learned that I get the most satisfaction from this one by taking it out at night, with my 32 MB MMC card inserted. This gives me enough room for eight pictures.

And a delightful focus-of-mind effect on my way of looking at things.

Two results from the last outing. Both in spite of a camera desperately crying "LOW LIGHT" in big red lettering across the screen. Obviously the longest exposure time possible is one second, and it falls back to an ISO100 setting.

Didn't do much to this one below.
Some careful lightening and a little cropping.

The Gargoyle
PIC_0018-01.jpeg
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Come to think about it, I might have set the ISO to hundred myself. But I'm almost sure I put it on auto ISO. Maybe.

And this next one I think is pretty fun.
Taken at the same time as the one above.

The Gargoyle, a Mutant Twin
PIC_0017-02.jpeg
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Erich_H

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Eastern Denmark (annexed in 1658 by Sweden)
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Erik
Oh, and when talking about useless old crap cameras:

This 8 MPix 3x optical zoom wonder was given to me by my dear sweet brother, @AJ68, as being, as I said, absolutely useless old crap.

View attachment 845787

He couldn't remember what the heck it was called, maybe Aiwa, but the name had completely worn off.

So I rebranded it as a Commodore, with some help from a nameplate from a scrapped Commodore PC and Mr. Superglue.

Now it is a truly unique, one of a kind, 8 effective megapixel Commodore digital camera. And as all you knowledgeable guys know, the secret of using old crapcams is to embrace the crappiness.

So, I've learned that I get the most satisfaction from this one by taking it out at night, with my 32 MB MMC card inserted. This gives me enough room for eight pictures.

And a delightful focus-of-mind effect on my way of looking at things.

Two results from the last outing. Both in spite of a camera desperately crying "LOW LIGHT" in big red lettering across the screen. Obviously the longest exposure time possible is one second, and it falls back to an ISO100 setting.

Didn't do much to this one below.
Some careful lightening and a little cropping.

The Gargoyle
View attachment 845788

Come to think about it, I might have set the ISO to hundred myself. But I'm almost sure I put it on auto ISO. Maybe.

And this next one I think is pretty fun.
Taken at the same time as the one above.

The Gargoyle, a Mutant Twin
View attachment 845789
I checked the ISO settings in the menu.
And there's no settings for ISO. What choices you have are limited to different scenes.
Truly set it and forget it! Which I obviously did.
 

Erich_H

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Sorry, @Erich_H has beaten you to it. :whistling:
No. I don't think so. I don't own a Salvation Army hall. And I sold a Nikon today...
FV5_0465-02.jpeg
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And tomorrow I'm getting rid of a Sony...
 
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Location
Hastings, NZ
My Dad's old camera - purchased I would guess about 1949 - 1950. I have a gorgeous photo of my mother, which must have been taken with this camera, on their honeymoon, in Auckland NZ, August 1950.

50332019013_15c2923038_h.jpg
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P9120023-2 Dads old camera by Rose McGillicuddy, on Flickr





And the photo of Mum

50332129218_6e37c7a8f4_h.jpg
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Pat honeymoon Farmers building Auckland by Rose McGillicuddy, on Flickr

I'm actually a bit annoyed as I can't find the restored (amateur effort) that I did a about ten years ago when we used that image for invitations to her 80th birthday. Have done a very quick edit for here, but need to redo it obviously.
 
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Erich_H

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Joined
Feb 8, 2020
Messages
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Location
Eastern Denmark (annexed in 1658 by Sweden)
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Erik
My Dad's old camera - purchased I would guess about 1949 - 1950. I have a gorgeous photo of my mother, which must have been taken with this camera, on their honeymoon, in Auckland NZ, August 1950.

View attachment 846503 P9120023-2 Dads old camera by Rose McGillicuddy, on Flickr





And the photo of Mum

View attachment 846504 Pat honeymoon Farmers building Auckland by Rose McGillicuddy, on Flickr

I'm actually a bit annoyed as I can't find the restored (amateur effort) that I did a about ten years ago when we used that image for invitations to her 80th birthday. Have done a very quick edit for here, but need to redo it obviously.
Beautiful!
Both mum, and camera!

Link to the manual (but I suppose you already have it):

https://www.cameramanuals.org/pdf_files/kershaw_penguin_roll_film.pdf

But, according to Camerapedia, this camera wasn't introduced until 1951. Maybe that's wrong, though...

https://camerapedia.fandom.com/wiki/Kershaw_Eight-20_Penguin

EDIT: according to this:

https://www.collection-appareils.fr/x/html/appareil-1194-Kershaw_Penguin eight-20.html

it was introduced in 1950.
 
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ex machina

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So I've a mystery to solve and hope you folks can help me solve it -- anyone recognize this camera?

grandsally's camera.png
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grandsally's camera II.png
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I belonged to my great grandmother, used quarter glass plate negatives, and accepted a remote shutter trigger, probably pneumatic. This photo was likely taken in 1904 in Roanoke, VA. USA. This is a crop of a mirror reflection in this photo.

From the same scene, the second, blurrier crop is from a scan I haven't restored yet. And confoundingly, this plate was taken in portrait orientation, while the first was in landscape, yet the camera orientation hasn't changed. Could this be a clue to the camera model? Or is this someone else's camera that just happened to be in the shot? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 
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