Show your Old Cameras

Ben Casper

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Mar 3, 2013
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146
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Kent UK
Not as old as some others posted, nevertheless an early one and still going strong.
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jimr.pdx

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~1hr north of Portland OR
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Ricoh-on Ricoh pair. The XR 70-150/4 is quite excellent
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!
 

docfox

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Mar 26, 2011
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356
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Hatfield, Pennsylvania, USA
Love those knife-carrying, left-handed SLRs!
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Erich_H

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Achtung! Hier gibts schöne Sache zu sehen!

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Exakta Varex IIb
 

Erich_H

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docfox

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Mar 26, 2011
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Hatfield, Pennsylvania, USA
Kodak's ugly duckling, the Kodak 35 Rangefinder introduced in 1940 to replace the Kodak 35 (without the un-coupled rangefinder) of 1938. This fixed lens camera had a bakelite body with metal trim. It was designed to compete with the Argus cameras of similar construction and cost $48 in 1940. Four different variations identifiable by lens and shutter combination were made up until 1951. (Note the RA lens date code on this lens says 1952!)
>>> click here to read the manual <<<
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Erich_H

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EXA, the peace-mongering younger sibling of the Exakta: No built-in film-slasher!​

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EXA IIa with Tele-Ennalyt f:2.8/135 mm
EXA IIb
with Domiplan f:2.8/50 mm
 
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docfox

Mu-43 Veteran
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Mar 26, 2011
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356
Location
Hatfield, Pennsylvania, USA
In 1945 Universal Camera Company introduced the Mercury II (CX) to replace its prewar Mercury, a leather covered cast aluminum half-frame camera featuring a rotary shutter (T, B, 1/20 to 1/1000). The post-war Mercury II was slightly larger, was cast from an (easily dulled) aluminum/magnesium alloy and covered with a synthetic leather. Most importantly, it used standard Eastman 35 mm cartridges instead of the Univex #200 of its predecessor (and thus had a rewind knob).

>>> click here to read the manual <<<

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ex machina

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Jan 3, 2014
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Baltimore, MD
In 1945 Universal Camera Company introduced the Mercury II (CX) to replace its prewar Mercury, a leather covered cast aluminum half-frame camera featuring a rotary shutter (T, B, 1/20 to 1/1000). The post-war Mercury II was slightly larger, was cast from an (easily dulled) aluminum/magnesium alloy and covered with a synthetic leather. Most importantly, it used standard Eastman 35 mm cartridges instead of the Univex #200 of its predecessor (and thus had a rewind knob).
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Capable of decent pics if you can nail focus.
 

docfox

Mu-43 Veteran
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Mar 26, 2011
Messages
356
Location
Hatfield, Pennsylvania, USA
Ansco imported cameras built by Agfa in Germany and sold them in the USA. The simple folding lens (fixed) 35 mm viewfinder only Regent was sold here circa 1953 to 1960. In Europe, Agfa sold the same camera as its Solinette II. A companion rangefinder model was sold as the Ansco Super Regent and in Europe as the Agfa Super Solinette. Rigid lens versions were sold as the Ansco Memar and Super Memar.

The Regent had a three element Agfa Apotar lens in a Prontor-SV shutter (1s to 1/300) with X and M class flash synchronization. The lens was surrounded by a ridged focusing ring and had a zone-focus scale on its barrel. The film transport was via the right-hand knob and the shutter had to be manually cocked before you could advance to the next frame. Number 5 filters (in an adaptor ring) could be used, but had to be removed to fold the lens standard.

>>> click here to read the manual <<<

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Erich_H

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In 1945 Universal Camera Company introduced the Mercury II (CX) to replace its prewar Mercury, a leather covered cast aluminum half-frame camera featuring a rotary shutter (T, B, 1/20 to 1/1000). The post-war Mercury II was slightly larger, was cast from an (easily dulled) aluminum/magnesium alloy and covered with a synthetic leather. Most importantly, it used standard Eastman 35 mm cartridges instead of the Univex #200 of its predecessor (and thus had a rewind knob).
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This is just so weird and wonderful!
Do you have any other lenses for it?
 

Erich_H

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No. This was a fixed lens camera. I think there may have been some lens variations available, but the (zone focussed) lens was not (intentionally) interchangeable.
Oh, well. Obviously, I was misinformed...
Or misinterpreting available information.

Available Lenses:
Tricor f:2.7/35 mm (coated)
Tricor f:3.5/35 mm (non coated)
Hexar f:2.0/? mm (looks like 35 mm according to my read of the manual)
>>>A pre-Konica Hexar!<<<
others: 75mm, 125mm
(http://camera-wiki.org/wiki/Mercury)
 
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docfox

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Joined
Mar 26, 2011
Messages
356
Location
Hatfield, Pennsylvania, USA
Erich_H - You are correct about the lens being interchangeable; I've owned this old camera for years and never realized it had interchangeable lenses. Mine is fitted with the 35 mm f/2.7 Tricor and it does unscrew just as the >>> manual <<< I just found and read describes! This publication also mentions a telescopic viewfinder that can fit on the second accessory shoe near the normal viewfinder. They also offered an extinction-type exposure meter to fit in this shoe! The central accessory shoe was a "hot shoe" with flash synch contact of which they were very proud.

One thing puzzles me, however. The lens unscrews from the focussing thread mount with its engraved zone focus distance chart. This implies the same rotational focus position (and lens mount to film plane) versus subject distance would be the same for 35, 75 and 125 mm lenses. I don't think this would work! The focus scale appears to be retained by three small flat head screws, but I doubt the maker would want a user changing the plate with a lens swap and there is no mention of such in these instructions.
 

Erich_H

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Erik
Erich_H - You are correct about the lens being interchangeable; I've owned this old camera for years and never realized it had interchangeable lenses. Mine is fitted with the 35 mm f/2.7 Tricor and it does unscrew just as the >>> manual <<< I just found and read describes! This publication also mentions a telescopic viewfinder that can fit on the second accessory shoe near the normal viewfinder. They also offered an extinction-type exposure meter to fit in this shoe! The central accessory shoe was a "hot shoe" with flash synch contact of which they were very proud.

One thing puzzles me, however. The lens unscrews from the focussing thread mount with its engraved zone focus distance chart. This implies the same rotational focus position (and lens mount to film plane) versus subject distance would be the same for 35, 75 and 125 mm lenses. I don't think this would work! The focus scale appears to be retained by three small flat head screws, but I doubt the maker would want a user changing the plate with a lens swap and there is no mention of such in these instructions.
As I said: This is just so weird and wonderful!

And pretty big words in the manual, about the American leadership of the photographic world before WW II.

I'm thinking that some Germans would have had other opinions 😉
 
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