Show wildflowers, only wildflowers in the wild

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A delicate blue sun-orchid, thelymitra species. I'm pretty excited to find a couple of sun-orchids in my nature strip this year, it's the first time I have seen them here!
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Another common blue native is one of several Wahlenbergia, our native bluebell. It varies from low to tall, ranging from tiny to overblown flowers, but always very slender; fascinatingly, I have seen it with 3, 4, or 5 petals on the same species! This one was the larger kind.
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A pair of spider-orchids, caladenia species, doing their dance on one stem.
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This is what is left of some native orchid species, such as the beards, spiders, and sun, after the flower becomes the seed pod, splits and dries - it's from the previous year:
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Blue pincushion, Brunonia australis. For fun, I tried the Sigma 30/1.4 with Raynox DCR-250 super macro snap on lens, which wasn't as great as the Olympus 60/2.8 macro lens, of course, but it wasn't bad either.
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The milkmaids, Burchardia umbellata, are taller and more abundant this season than I've seen before. Along with chocolate lilies, blue pincushions, goodenias, and flowering grasses, they form part of the woodland ground cover.

Taken with Sigma 30/1.4 and Raynox DCR-250.
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I was shocked to find most of the orchids have finished, their spent flowers tattered and the remaining heads swelling into seed pods. This beard-orchid may be one of the last I'll see this season. It's always like this, all over in a breathless rush :(
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...with Raynox DCR-250 macro lens.
 
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a few natives flowering just now

this little orchid was growing in the gravel verge about a foot from edge of bitumen
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and this one next to it but not fully open
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Dolly Bush ~ Cassinia aculeata
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Think this is a variety of Oxalis, so not sure then it's a native
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As I understand it, that oxalis is an endemic native variety.
thanks Melanie. I did find one reference to Tasmanian variety but it didn't give any detail.
I've seen two in different areas and in bush land but not where a vehicle couldn't have carted it.
I'd assumed (hoped) it was a native as its very pretty.
Interestingly both plants had only a single flower.
 
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This season has been excellent for the blue pincushion Brunonia australis, also known as native cornflower. These are usually seen in clusters.
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Back when the leopard orchids were everywhere, last month.
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A common, prolifically-flowering local heath. There's something about the rendering of the GX9 that I love for macro shots.
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My first time seeing blue-spike milkwort (obscenely scientifically named comesperma calymega) out in local bushland today, taken with Sigma 30/1.4 lens.
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After the main flowering activity of October has passed, I don't tend to look in the bushland for flowers much, but with late rains in the season I was delighted to find quite a lot of flowering joy going on out there today. I've never seen such lush fringe-lilies here before!
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How's this for a wildflower? The Australian xanthorrhoea - known by many common names, such as grass tree, yakka, kangaroo tail - has a tall, sturdy spear-like spike up to a couple of metres long, covered in flowers which nectar-loving insects adore. I think of it as a pop-up bar for them!

Besides the dozen or so butterflies at this bar, there were also many ants and bees (European and native).
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=BY=SERG

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White flag iris, butterfly iris Diplarrena moraea
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