Show: Tools, fixtures, and jigs

tonyturley

Mu-43 Top Veteran
Joined
Nov 19, 2014
Messages
912
I searched and poked around the forums and didn't see a similar thread title, so here goes. This thread is a showcase of tools, fixtures, and jigs devised to accomplish one or more tasks. Feel free to add your own.

I'll start with a simple contraption I made to cut and glue the scarf joint for a tenor guitar neck. It consists of two pieces of wood glued together at a 13 degree angle. Behind it you can see the two halves of the body mold, and further back, the Indian Rosewood guitar back with the Spruce bracing glued in place.

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
Joined
Feb 15, 2014
Messages
10,715
Location
Southwest Utah
Real Name
What Is Real Anyway?

tonyturley

Mu-43 Top Veteran
Joined
Nov 19, 2014
Messages
912
I have lots of tools and fixtures, and I have built many jigs, but I don’t seem to have many photos of them. I did find this recent one though.
Jigs are quite handy, especially if one needs precision, but they can take a long time to put together. It took a lot of time to craft the pieces for the guitar body molds above. That's also where I had my first (and only) major shop accident, where my finger got pulled into a spinning router bit. It missed the bone and fingernail, but is still on the mend after almost a month. Although I was playing guitar in church the next day, I can still only use a pick - it's still far too tender for fingerpicking. I was very, very fortunate. The accident is what led me to buy a proper router table.
 

tonyturley

Mu-43 Top Veteran
Joined
Nov 19, 2014
Messages
912
A simple sliding sled for cutting the fret slots in the Rosewood fingerboard for my guitar project. Used a thin kerf saw blade on my 63 year old Shopsmith.

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 

speedy

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
Nov 27, 2015
Messages
2,121
I have lots of tools and fixtures, and I have built many jigs, but I don’t seem to have many photos of them.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^This is me. I've made a heap of jigs etc for very small production runs at work, when making products, - like 3 or 4 at a time, but never taken a photo of them. That I can remember anyway. Probably because they're horrifically agricultural looking, and not at all attractive In the least.
 
Joined
Feb 15, 2014
Messages
10,715
Location
Southwest Utah
Real Name
What Is Real Anyway?
Joined
Feb 15, 2014
Messages
10,715
Location
Southwest Utah
Real Name
What Is Real Anyway?
I can see a dividing head in your future ;)
There was an indexing head just out of view on that photo. I also have a vertical / horizontal rotary table for odd work. For serious work there is a Haas VF4 CNC with a pallet changer, and a chucker lathe that has been turned into a CNC. Manual machining is more interesting for me usually.

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
EM122744-1 by Harvey Richards, on Flickr
 
Joined
Feb 15, 2014
Messages
10,715
Location
Southwest Utah
Real Name
What Is Real Anyway?

speedy

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
Nov 27, 2015
Messages
2,121
Here's a real roughy I found on my phone. Fabricating spacer modules for sectional spreader lifting beams. You can see my little laser level sitting on the tripod in the background, ensuring the pipe, & flange bolt holes are all level & within tolerance. the short sections are harder to fabricate than the longer ones, as any out of tolerance over a short distance is magnified exponentially once you bolt more sections on. You may also notice the heat marks on the flanges, I heat shrink them (contra heating) slightly concave before welding to allow for weld distortion. After welding, the flange faces pull back pretty flat, with a slight concavity in the middle. Which is good, as the center carries no load, but if it's convex can cause misalignment issues when sections are bolted together. Little bit old school :)
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 

Olympist

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
Messages
135
Stone crusher, Mine of Outokumpu, Finland
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
Joined
Aug 2, 2013
Messages
1,464
Location
Colorado
I'm a huge fan of power tapping. Especially 1/2 -13.

View attachment 713915EM122756-Edit-1 by Harvey Richards, on Flickr
We have this little pneumatic tapping machine (basically a die grinder on a set of linkages) each of the taps has a built in clutch for that size. Oh, man. I thought it was gimmicky until I had to make an optical breadboard out of Aluminum plate for a rush setup. It was life changing. It probably would have been just as fast on one of the machines, but I'm a horrendous machinist.
Looks like this: FLEXARM Air Tapping Arm with 51" Reach and 80 ft.-lb. Torque - 33NY37|S36-FX900110 - Grainger
 
Joined
Feb 15, 2014
Messages
10,715
Location
Southwest Utah
Real Name
What Is Real Anyway?
We have this little pneumatic tapping machine (basically a die grinder on a set of linkages) each of the taps has a built in clutch for that size. Oh, man. I thought it was gimmicky until I had to make an optical breadboard out of Aluminum plate for a rush setup. It was life changing. It probably would have been just as fast on one of the machines, but I'm a horrendous machinist.
Looks like this: FLEXARM Air Tapping Arm with 51" Reach and 80 ft.-lb. Torque - 33NY37|S36-FX900110 - Grainger
That would be awesome to have, if I had a dollar for every hole that I have tapped by hand, I could afford several of them. All in all though, sometimes I just feel safer hand tapping.
 
Last edited:

tonyturley

Mu-43 Top Veteran
Joined
Nov 19, 2014
Messages
912
I seem to have developed somewhat of an aversion to using my power tools, after the accident I mentioned earlier in the thread. The finger has healed fully on the outside, but even after 8 weeks, it is still a bit tender to use it when playing a guitar finger style. My progress on the guitar I mentioned in my first post has slowed quite a bit. I still have some work to do on it that will involve rotary cutting devices, and I find myself dragging my feet on those particular operations. I'm just not a good enough wood worker to accurately do some of the steps I need to do using only hand tools.
 
Joined
Feb 15, 2014
Messages
10,715
Location
Southwest Utah
Real Name
What Is Real Anyway?
I seem to have developed somewhat of an aversion to using my power tools, after the accident I mentioned earlier in the thread. The finger has healed fully on the outside, but even after 8 weeks, it is still a bit tender to use it when playing a guitar finger style. My progress on the guitar I mentioned in my first post has slowed quite a bit. I still have some work to do on it that will involve rotary cutting devices, and I find myself dragging my feet on those particular operations. I'm just not a good enough wood worker to accurately do some of the steps I need to do using only hand tools.
Some machine tools I don't even really think about when I use them, others I have a very healthy respect (or fear) for. There is also a different kind of reward when you only use hand tools. That reward may come a month after it would have if you had used power tools though.
 

Mike Wingate

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
Feb 21, 2017
Messages
2,363
Location
Altrincham
Real Name
Mike Wingate
Just a setup to drill a semi circle in the teak
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
, to build some Norwegian style cam operated plank clamps. I will alter it slightly to use as my spoon pony.
 

speedy

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
Nov 27, 2015
Messages
2,121
Here's another jig I made, for assembling & welding overhead gantry bridge crane beams. Measured out the overall length, made jacking screws & dumpied all the UB's level, stringlined a straight edge, & went for it. Had to fabricate a vertical camber into it, that's what the 1 tonne weights are on the ends for. Did a little bit of contra heating after welding, to get the required spec. Good fun. Enjoyable work
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

And the finished articles, ready for installation
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

Installation in progress. Myself & another mate spent a week or so installing the supporting steelwork for the rails, & the rails themselves. Really good work. Sorry, getting a wee bit sidetracked :)
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


Edit -contra heating, or heat shrinking, is the process of restraining steel, either plate or structural member, heating it to the right temperature in the right spots, in the correct amounts, and allowing the resulting shrinkage to either straighten, or bend the steel in the required direction. Bit of an art to it, just takes old fashioned practice to understand where, & how much :)
 
Last edited:

speedy

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
Nov 27, 2015
Messages
2,121
Same jig being pressed into service for another lifting beam. Fabricated out of 50mm plate, & required careful control of heat, before & during welding. Preheated to 100 degrees C from memory, as it's a 350 grade material, done to standards, & welds were X-rayed after completion. Another really good job. I also bored all the 90 & 100mm holes in situ, a bit difficult to try & lift it up onto a milling/boring machine :)
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


Nearing completion
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 

speedy

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
Nov 27, 2015
Messages
2,121
Another one of my little projects. A man sized lifting shackle, fabricated out of 2" or 50mm solid bar. First, draw out & cut a former to bend the bar around. Tack to bench, add guides as required while heat bending.

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


Set up some stops & angle plate jig in radial arm drill.

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


Mark out a jig, & add a few stops on the bench.

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


The finished article :)

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

I did the machining as well, except for the center pin. Enjoyable work
 

Latest posts

Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Mu-43 is a fan site and not associated with Olympus, Panasonic, or other manufacturers mentioned on this site.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Copyright © 2009-2019 Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom