Show radio communication infrastructure - cellular, broadcast, relay, whatever

camit34

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Just found this thread so here’s one taken at work a few weeks ago.
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Zapp DJR

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j_win

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Zapp DJR

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Really dig the old building but it looks like it’s in a rough part of town. What is with the netting around the bay-window areas?
I can only presume that as the bay windows "sticks out" over the pavement, nets are to prevent the loose plaster against falling directly on ones head.
 

djtaylor7

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Two ATC towers at Dingli, Malta (a few years ago)
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kwalsh

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Didn't know this thread existed! A few from the past couple of years:

Here's a blast from the past as it were, one of the AT&T Long Lines sites out in the Mojave desert. This is Turquoise Mountain and this was a major hub in the system linking multiple routes. You can see all the various pairs of a Hogg Horns pointed out to various other stations. The horns are disconnected now of course, but at least at this site they are still in place on the tower.

And speaking of "blast" that's a pretty huge concrete building with blast reinforced walls to hold all the switching equipment it took to run a site like this. These sites weren't meant to survive direct strikes but to survive blast from strikes on other potential nearby targets.

190725_Mojave_I7250332-X5.jpg
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Wider panorama to give context of the site:

190725_Mojave_I7250325-Pano-5K.jpg
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Looking way into the distance you can pick out one of the sites Turquoise cross linked to, the Kelso site:

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The above photos shot with an IR modified E-M5II.

Most of the AT&T Long Lines sites were all divested quite sometime ago when fiber took over and sold to tower leasing companies. Turquoise mountain is in this category and as you can see has since sprouted a variety of more modern antennas and infrastructure.

Here is one of the repeater sites called Ibex that connected to Turquoise:

200127_DVNP__DSC0273-X5.jpg
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The Hogg Horns have been removed from this as it was repurposed as a standard cell base station. Note the much smaller but still hardened equipment building. As this just had to be a repeater and didn't require any switching it required far less infrastructure than the installation on Turquoise. Turquoise Mountain is just visible on the distant ridge in the upper left of this photo. Here it is at 1:1 in color:

i-VnCg25g.jpg
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Apologies that the above photos of Ibex are from a Nikon Z7...

Not to far away from Turquoise is its complementary technology of the day, a bunker supporting a hardened underground coax line:

190725_Mojave_I7250280-X5.jpg
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This is really just the topside structures for access. In the foreground is an escape hatch as the building behind it which was the normal access was assumed to be destroyed and fouled with debris after a nuclear strike. These bunkers were spaced along the line to provide power and signal conditioning. Coax is very lossy compared to optical fiber or free space microwaves and there are booster amps built into the lines about every mile or less. Larger infrastructure like this is required every so often to provide power for those distributed amplifiers along the line. This system was designed to handle far higher blast pressures than the Long Lines sites which of course had to have exposed antennas to work.

When auctioned off this particular bunker was bought by a private party who was planning on building and selling suites in it to preppers with more dollars than sense. These sites have little communications relevance anymore as coax required way more infrastructure to support than optical fiber and so you don't need nearly so many of them. Fiber does follow many of the old coax rights of way though but doesn't need to use these frequently spaced bunkers. Thus no communications companies bought them.

Photo also from an IR modified E-M5II.

There's some great comms history out there to explore!
 

BosseBe

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Didn't know this thread existed! A few from the past couple of years:

Here's a blast from the past as it were, one of the AT&T Long Lines sites out in the Mojave desert. This is Turquoise Mountain and this was a major hub in the system linking multiple routes. You can see all the various pairs of a Hogg Horns pointed out to various other stations. The horns are disconnected now of course, but at least at this site they are still in place on the tower.

And speaking of "blast" that's a pretty huge concrete building with blast reinforced walls to hold all the switching equipment it took to run a site like this. These sites weren't meant to survive direct strikes but to survive blast from strikes on other potential nearby targets.

View attachment 834974

Wider panorama to give context of the site:

View attachment 834975

Looking way into the distance you can pick out one of the sites Turquoise cross linked to, the Kelso site:

View attachment 834979

The above photos shot with an IR modified E-M5II.

Most of the AT&T Long Lines sites were all divested quite sometime ago when fiber took over and sold to tower leasing companies. Turquoise mountain is in this category and as you can see has since sprouted a variety of more modern antennas and infrastructure.

Here is one of the repeater sites called Ibex that connected to Turquoise:

View attachment 834976

The Hogg Horns have been removed from this as it was repurposed as a standard cell base station. Note the much smaller but still hardened equipment building. As this just had to be a repeater and didn't require any switching it required far less infrastructure than the installation on Turquoise. Turquoise Mountain is just visible on the distant ridge in the upper left of this photo. Here it is at 1:1 in color:

View attachment 834977

Apologies that the above photos of Ibex are from a Nikon Z7...

Not to far away from Turquoise is its complementary technology of the day, a bunker supporting a hardened underground coax line:

View attachment 834978

This is really just the topside structures for access. In the foreground is an escape hatch as the building behind it which was the normal access was assumed to be destroyed and fouled with debris after a nuclear strike. These bunkers were spaced along the line to provide power and signal conditioning. Coax is very lossy compared to optical fiber or free space microwaves and there are booster amps built into the lines about every mile or less. Larger infrastructure like this is required every so often to provide power for those distributed amplifiers along the line. This system was designed to handle far higher blast pressures than the Long Lines sites which of course had to have exposed antennas to work.

When auctioned off this particular bunker was bought by a private party who was planning on building and selling suites in it to preppers with more dollars than sense. These sites have little communications relevance anymore as coax required way more infrastructure to support than optical fiber and so you don't need nearly so many of them. Fiber does follow many of the old coax rights of way though but doesn't need to use these frequently spaced bunkers. Thus no communications companies bought them.

Photo also from an IR modified E-M5II.

There's some great comms history out there to explore!
Thanks for sharing that, interesting to read about what you look at.
 

rloewy

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Aushiker

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Zapp DJR

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Panolyman

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I think this oldie might qualify:
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