Show off your prints!

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Thanks. I was almost happy how they turned out. Some of them I should've made a bit lighter, since they were going on a wall without spot lighting. But otherwise they're nice.
I have the same problem: prints come out darker than I want, compared to the screen. I managed to get the colors less or more correct but I am waiting for a new calibration/profiling device (the old one has become very unreliable).
One thing I've found with Canson ICC profiles for the Pixma Pro-200 is that they tend to lean a bit yellow. With some images needing the yellows toned down a bit and given a slight magenta boost. But nothing really huge with the Baryta. It might have been the BFK Rives that gave an unusably yellow look with the manufacturer's profile. But out of the four Canson papers I've tried, that was the only one where this was a real issue.
In my experience displays tend towards blue hues when not profiled. Correcting for this on screen gives yellowish prints when using a correct profile for the printer because the printer doesn't know the file is compensating for a too blue display.
 

John King

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Some displays come factory calibrated. My Dell UP2516D did, so did my Asus PA246Q monitors. I know some others do as well.

It's important to adjust the brightness of ALL monitors to suit the viewing conditions, and do not have any artificial light falling on the screen.
 

The Electric Squirrel

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Thing is I only get this slight color shift using Canson papers with their factory supplied paper profiles. I don't see this with Hahnemühle's Photo Rag Ultra Smooth or Ilford's Studio papers using their own profiles.

But it's not a huge issue really. Since I know it's there and shows up in certain images, I can easily correct for it.
 
Joined
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IME baryta papers all have a warm, yellowish cast.
Shouldn't the paper's ICC profile compensate for that? I just finished a print and the whites and grays are very neutral. Still a bit too dark for my taste, I need to calibrate the screen.
One must use a colour managed workflow for successful printing.
I fully agree. For me it all starts with a calibrated and profiled display. It is hard to know what to expect on paper when I'm not sure about the colors on the display.
Initially printing can be hard, but once the workflow is setup correctly it is very rewarding.
 

The Electric Squirrel

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Calibrating a display might help, I don't have a profiled monitor and I'm bound to using my laptop for now. But there are workarounds. I did do a "calibration" with Win10's own tools, and that helped a lot. Actually to the point that when I ordered prints from a professional service, I got exactly the colours and brightness I was after. And I just told them to print them as is, no colour adjustments.

And the situation is basically the same now with my own printer. But there are some caveats. First, learning that the screen is not and never will be the print. And secondly, especially with prints going on walls, to always adjust the print to the lighting it's going to be viewed in. What might look nice on an A4 print meant to be seen handheld, can be really too dark for a wall. Learned this the hard way.

I found that making a pattern print that varies contrast and brightness and then viewing that under the intended lighting before committing large sheets can be very helpful.
 
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Calibrating a display might help, I don't have a profiled monitor and I'm bound to using my laptop for now. But there are workarounds. I did do a "calibration" with Win10's own tools, and that helped a lot. Actually to the point that when I ordered prints from a professional service, I got exactly the colours and brightness I was after. And I just told them to print them as is, no colour adjustments.
That seems to be a good solution. The aim is to get the colors you want.
And the situation is basically the same now with my own printer. But there are some caveats. First, learning that the screen is not and never will be the print. And secondly, especially with prints going on walls, to always adjust the print to the lighting it's going to be viewed in. What might look nice on an A4 print meant to be seen handheld, can be really too dark for a wall. Learned this the hard way.
Indeed, we can increase the brightness for a print that will be displayed in a dark corner of the room.
I found that making a pattern print that varies contrast and brightness and then viewing that under the intended lighting before committing large sheets can be very helpful.
That's what we did in the old days and it still works!
 

The Electric Squirrel

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That Windows calibration tool just makes you slide sliders around to get the colors you want. It does work wonders, though. Before the process this laptop monitor was almost unusable for editing, now it's OK. One thing that's left is that it clips shadows a bit too much. I sometimes find that I've lifted them a tad too much. That's why I often assess my edits on multiple devices and monitors.

I do have a second LG 23" monitor upstairs in my smaller work space, but I rarely use that. And it might need real calibration. Even after the Win10 "calibration" process I find it a bit washed out. Might be due to age, also. It's a decade old monitor.
 

Mack

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That Windows calibration tool just makes you slide sliders around to get the colors you want. It does work wonders, though. Before the process this laptop monitor was almost unusable for editing, now it's OK. One thing that's left is that it clips shadows a bit too much. I sometimes find that I've lifted them a tad too much. That's why I often assess my edits on multiple devices and monitors.

I do have a second LG 23" monitor upstairs in my smaller work space, but I rarely use that. And it might need real calibration. Even after the Win10 "calibration" process I find it a bit washed out. Might be due to age, also. It's a decade old monitor.
How do you like the Canon Pro-200?

My old Canon 9000 Mark II finally gave up on the black printhead channel and refuses to squirt right on a couple of nozzles. Canon no longer sells the printhead for it and can't find one on eBay either. Local dealer has one Canon 200 left and I may buy it, dunno. I have three other Epsons but the Canon was my general go-to for office as well as PDF printing and some photos in 13" size (Also, much cheaper t refill below with OCP inks.).

Fwiw, I use to refill the old 9000 with some 3rd party inks which brought the cost of an ink cart down to about 33 cents per refill. It actually worked out well, but I also have a couple of calibration tools for monitor and prints (x-rite, now Colorbrite, things like Colormunki Photo and i1PhotoPro 2.). I see there are refillable carts for the 200 here: https://www.inkproducts.com/ink-store441/product.php?productid=2233&cat=330&page=1 On my old 9000 I had to use a reset tool that basically re-wrote the carts chip to tell it that it was a new filled cart, but unsure of these newer ones which appear larger in capacity too.

Decisions...
 

BosseBe

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That Windows calibration tool just makes you slide sliders around to get the colors you want. It does work wonders, though. Before the process this laptop monitor was almost unusable for editing, now it's OK. One thing that's left is that it clips shadows a bit too much. I sometimes find that I've lifted them a tad too much. That's why I often assess my edits on multiple devices and monitors.

I do have a second LG 23" monitor upstairs in my smaller work space, but I rarely use that. And it might need real calibration. Even after the Win10 "calibration" process I find it a bit washed out. Might be due to age, also. It's a decade old monitor.
Of course you already know that you can calibrate your laptop screen with a colorimeter as well as a separate screen.
I calibrate both my stationary PC's screen and my laptop screen with my Spyder5.
 

The Electric Squirrel

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How do you like the Canon Pro-200?

My old Canon 9000 Mark II finally gave up on the black printhead channel and refuses to squirt right on a couple of nozzles. Canon no longer sells the printhead for it and can't find one on eBay either. Local dealer has one Canon 200 left and I may buy it, dunno. I have three other Epsons but the Canon was my general go-to for office as well as PDF printing and some photos in 13" size (Also, much cheaper t refill below with OCP inks.).
I absolutely love it. Most fun toy I've had in a while. Even the worst results I've had with it were still good, and generally the print quality is excellent on the papers I like.

Wouldn't use it as a document printer, though. Works, but slow and I already have an old HP Color Laserjet for that.

Of course you already know that you can calibrate your laptop screen with a colorimeter as well as a separate screen.
I calibrate both my stationary PC's screen and my laptop screen with my Spyder5.
Yup. Know that. And I might even do that, since a guy in the village I just moved in promised to lend me his SpyderX once he gets back from his summer cottage. I'm not so sure even that can correct the crushing of shadow detail I see, but I'll try, if it's for free. And still doesn't change the fact, that the screen is never the print...
 

John King

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Shouldn't the paper's ICC profile compensate for that? I just finished a print and the whites and grays are very neutral. Still a bit too dark for my taste, I need to calibrate the screen.
The profile will correct for the paper's 'ink layer', not for the underlying 'support layer'. I've seen exactly the same with rag papers. Shop I used to frequent had very large prints side by side on all these stocks. The colour cast on baryta and rag stocks put me right off them!

I use Ilford papers, which have a neutral white support layer.

I fully agree. For me it all starts with a calibrated and profiled display. It is hard to know what to expect on paper when I'm not sure about the colors on the display.
Initially printing can be hard, but once the workflow is setup correctly it is very rewarding.
Yes, it is. Nothing beats a print or a book.
 

The Electric Squirrel

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The profile will correct for the paper's 'ink layer', not for the underlying 'support layer'. I've seen exactly the same with rag papers. Shop I used to frequent had very large prints side by side on all these stocks. The colour cast on baryta and rag stocks put me right off them!

I use Ilford papers, which have a neutral white support layer.
I use Ilford's Studio Satin for everyday prints, but I absolutely love Hahnemühle's Photo Rag! I guess tastes vary here, but it lends some midtones a sort of glow no other paper has. And the fact that it has no glare gives it an almost 3D look on the wall. Canson's Baryta might be the glossiest paper I accept in sizes larger than A4.

I just received a box of Hahnemühle Photo Matt Fibre in the mail. Considerably cheaper than the rag, and so far looks promising. It's whiter than the rag, and doesn't have that "glow" to midtones, but those seem to be the most notable differences. Could be a little thicker, though.
 

L0n3Gr3yW0lf

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?hash=3dcd7aff8fffa9e04b04122920d8ded2.jpg
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The last A3 prints I made before sending the printer off, I needed to use the remaining black frames. The paper was Canon Luster A3, on the left is with my Big Oly and on the right is my girlfriend's Little Sony (RX100 Mark III).
 

The Electric Squirrel

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A few A3+ prints on Hahnemühle Photo Matt with Canon Pro-200. Nice paper considering it's relatively sane price. Not quite as impressive as the photo rags, but surprisingly close.

P1080235_s.jpg
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Please excuse the image quality, our dining room was quite dimly lit since it's been a gloomy day outside, so this was ISO3200 on the GX80.
 

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