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AaronE

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Idaho
Back country Grand Teton National Park. Olympus EM5 MKi, Olympus 12-40mm.

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Until recently, we've camped in either our caravan (for home-away-from-home comfort), a canvas touring tent (for ease of actually being able to stand up to dress), or an instant-up tent (for absolute minimum kit). We are now proud owners of an early model Trayon camper, built in Queensland with Australian components, and it's virtually the same as they now make them, nearly 30 years on.

It is designed for the back of a traytop utility/truck, but ours is on a trailer so it can be set up and left. We used it for a few nights on the road (photos of our trip here: https://www.mu-43.com/threads/my-visual-diary-2021-victorian-mallee-roadtrip-january.110350/) and are thrilled with it. It can be fully set up / packed up in around 10 minutes. Unlike most camper / tent trailers, it has a kitchen and dining area inside, and the bed folds down with the lid to create an awning. With heavy-duty wind-down legs at the back, and legs under the awning, it was very sturdy in the wind.

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Joined
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Beaumaris, Melbourne, Australia
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John ...
Until recently, we've camped in either our caravan (for home-away-from-home comfort), a canvas touring tent (for ease of actually being able to stand up to dress), or an instant-up tent (for absolute minimum kit). We are now proud owners of an early model Trayon camper, built in Queensland with Australian components, and it's virtually the same as they now make them, nearly 30 years on.

It is designed for the back of a traytop utility/truck, but ours is on a trailer so it can be set up and left. We used it for a few nights on the road (photos of our trip here: https://www.mu-43.com/threads/my-visual-diary-2021-victorian-mallee-roadtrip-january.110350/) and are thrilled with it. It can be fully set up / packed up in around 10 minutes. Unlike most camper / tent trailers, it has a kitchen and dining area inside, and the bed folds down with the lid to create an awning. With heavy-duty wind-down legs at the back, and legs under the awning, it was very sturdy in the wind.

View attachment 868445
Nice setup, Melanie.

My trailer (c.1980) used to look like that.

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After major structural repairs and replacements, it now looks like this:

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gnarlydog australia

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Damiano Visocnik
Don't you worry about snakes and insects and things that creep? I'd be too scared ... mind you I have become soft in my old age :)
I bet with my friend that within 24 hrs I will get a question/comment about snakes. I win :)

People have been camping outside without the illusion of "protection" of the thin nylon walls of a tent for centuries, and I am yet to hear a credible report of snakes coming up to them at night (deep tropics excluded).
For me it's like this: majority of the year I have to spend it inside 4 walls; those few days that I have the luxury to be away from buildings I cherish the experience of being really outside. If it wasn't for the light drizzle I would have skipped putting up the tarp.
Now, if I was to camp in a mosquito infested area, that would be a different game altogether :crying:
 

gnarlydog australia

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I agree, Rose.

One's creature comforts become more like absolute necessities as one gets beyond about 50 y.o. IMO. And I'm well past that!
generally yes, but I don't see it as a necessity. I have backpacked off-track on a multi-day trip with people in their late 70's, some in their 80's. I had more comfort luxuries with me than them :blush:
I am yet to experience an uncomfortable night camping like that, while unfortunately I have spent a few nights in decent hotels that were rather ordinary (bed with no support, crappy neighbors, etc).
 

mcgillro

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Joined
Feb 10, 2019
Messages
862
Location
Hastings, NZ
I bet with my friend that within 24 hrs I will get a question/comment about snakes. I win :)

People have been camping outside without the illusion of "protection" of the thin nylon walls of a tent for centuries, and I am yet to hear a credible report of snakes coming up to them at night (deep tropics excluded).
For me it's like this: majority of the year I have to spend it inside 4 walls; those few days that I have the luxury to be away from buildings I cherish the experience of being really outside. If it wasn't for the light drizzle I would have skipped putting up the tarp.
Now, if I was to camp in a mosquito infested area, that would be a different game altogether :crying:
Hmm yes good points. When I was younger I slept better and worried less I guess :) I do remember camping beside the bach that my family were in out at Te Kopi on the Palliser coast, and waking in the night, thinking somoeone was out there. Of course it was just a sheep!
 
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John ...
generally yes, but I don't see it as a necessity. I have backpacked off-track on a multi-day trip with people in their late 70's, some in their 80's. I had more comfort luxuries with me than them :blush:
I am yet to experience an uncomfortable night camping like that, while unfortunately I have spent a few nights in decent hotels that were rather ordinary (bed with no support, crappy neighbors, etc).
Yes, but do you understand the ramifications of a total colectomy and Raynaud's disease (etc ... )? :rofl: (but not really laughing, just glad to be here at all).
 
Joined
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Location
Tasmania
An old scanned slide from my Pentax ME Super days.
Walls of Jerusalem, Tasmania
My second daughter would accompany me on many trips to the highlands.
The Walls as they are affectionately known are a magnificent collection of mountains surrounding a smallish plain.


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They were the days when wildlife was still prolific, and before the Tasmanian Devil tumour disease took hold.
You'd always protect your gear at night.
Tie your boots to the tent pole with the laces, weigh down food containers.
One night I woke to grunting and grabbed my boots disappearing out the tent.
Then went to sleep.
Next day greeted with this.
A Tasmanian Devil had pulled the pack outside and bitten through the side of the pack and the rest is evident.
The insurance paid for the repairs and the report was quite amusing.
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John ...
That sure did tidy up nicely, and then some! Any chance you'll get to use it, John?
Thanks, Melanie. I did have fun working it all out, and doing it. Same track and wheels as my Forester. It now has a McHitch articulated hitch and panniers for 20L water, 20L fuel and gas bottles. All secured, naturally. The tent lifts for access to the trailer bed (whether the tent is deployed or closed). When closed, there is access via a hatch under the mattress.

Wiring is 'armoured'. Rear number plate is fully articulated.

Fully loaded, it weighs about 700 kg. The Forester tows it like it's not even there.

My SWMBO loathes camping ...

I would really need a second person to help me to put up/take down.

No one else I feel quite that close to!
 
Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
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An old scanned slide from my Pentax ME Super days.
Walls of Jerusalem, Tasmania
My second daughter would accompany me on many trips to the highlands.
The Walls as they are affectionately known are a magnificent collection of mountains surrounding a smallish plain.


View attachment 868477

They were the days when wildlife was still prolific, and before the Tasmanian Devil tumour disease took hold.
You'd always protect your gear at night.
Tie your boots to the tent pole with the laces, weigh down food containers.
One night I woke to grunting and grabbed my boots disappearing out the tent.
Then went to sleep.
Next day greeted with this.
A Tasmanian Devil had pulled the pack outside and bitten through the side of the pack and the rest is evident.
The insurance paid for the repairs and the report was quite amusing.
View attachment 868478
I thought it was just bears and raccoons that hikers had to look out for! Although I did hear of a possum on the Overland Track in Tasmania that had acquired a taste for hand sanitizer 😱
 
Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
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Thanks, Melanie. I did have fun working it all out, and doing it. Same track and wheels as my Forester. It now has a McHitch articulated hitch and panniers for 20L water, 20L fuel and gas bottles. All secured, naturally. The tent lifts for access to the trailer bed (whether the tent is deployed or closed). When closed, there is access via a hatch under the mattress.

Wiring is 'armoured'. Rear number plate is fully articulated.

Fully loaded, it weighs about 700 kg. The Forester tows it like it's not even there.

My SWMBO loathes camping ...

I would really need a second person to help me to put up/take down.

No one else I feel quite that close to!
A lot of thought went into that - it sounds like you really enjoyed the project.
 

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