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WRay

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Fluidity ... and thank you Mr. Monet

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CD77

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BosseBe

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Some scattered barns in Vasikkavuoma, Sweden:
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Crdome

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archaeopteryx

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didn’t know about the fire resistant element
Pretty much every ecosystem is adapted to---and therefore tends to be dependent on---some pattern of disturbance. I guess a forest beginning another cycle like it has roughly every 10-40 years for the past few millennia doesn't make much of a news story, though. Both images I posted are of areas burned at low severity and, in general, even large forest fires with a substantial portion of their area in high severity patches probably don't qualify as catastrophic in the sense of triggering conversion to some other ecosystem type, at least not unless combined with some type of chronic disturbance. Three resources for looking at fires this way in the United States are RAVG, MTBS, and LANDFIRE. Many countries provide something similar, such as Canada's CFWIS.

Ways in which suppressing wildfire shifts plant communities adapted to frequent fire towards ones more adapted to less frequent fires are fairly well studied, though. In a bottom up sense, that's why both links in my previous post are to the Fire Effects Information System. For western North American forests, a nutshell summary can be found in this TEDx talk. Since this was prompted by coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens), the most relevant survey covering a range of climates and fire regimes would probably be Fire in California's Ecosystems (expensive to buy but available through the University of California library system and some chapters are open access). For your area it might good to start, hmm, maybe here depending on what you're interested in.

Oops! Too late.
Both Harvey and I posted routine prescribed fires. As opposed to, say, engines, matches, campfires, fireworks, post-fire images, or other forms of combustion. I suppose I should point out, though, that in most areas 85-95% of wildland fires are started by people and nearly all of those result from somebody doing something stupid. There's often a range of local information and data available but if I were to link just one general source it would be FireSmart.
 
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WRay

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barry13

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