Show and request

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BosseBe

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Hope this is a correct interpretation of Gnarly! (Taken before my µ43 days.)
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Show: Tranquil
 

Hendrik

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Tranquil

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Show: Resilience
 

archaeopteryx

Gambian sidling bush
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Resilience: I could respond with the same picture I used for Gnarly, those redwoods are pretty resilient!
Well, technically, they're fire resistant like most any other thick-barked tree species found in areas with frequent fire. Other such species on that side of North America are giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum), western larch (Larix occidentalis), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), and ponderosa (Pinus ponderosa).

The understory of such forests, however, usually burns more completely and therefore relies on fire resilience from a suite of abilities to regrow after fire. One approach is resprouting from rhizomes and tubers which remain unburnt underground. Another is establishment of a seedbank which germinates in response to fire and adaptation of the germinants to succeed on burnt sites. A third is good dispersal of seed from adjacent unburnt areas into burnt areas and similar adaptation to recolonize burnt sites. Much of what's burning in the image below is bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata), which relies on recolonization.
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Another fire resilient shrub that's a minority species in the above image and a majority one in the below, is snowbrush (Ceanothus velutinus), which both seedbanks and resprouts. The below is a snowbrush patch below ponderosa 15 months after a wildfire showing one growing season's worth of resprouting (the curled leaves are normal for the species). After a second or maybe third growing season it won't look much different from it did before fire as the skeletons of pre-fire snowbrush will be hidden in the regrowth and the remaining scorched leaves will have dropped to the ground.
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Show: Combustion ;)
 
Last edited:

Crdome

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Well, technically, they're fire resistant like most any other thick-barked tree species found in areas with frequent fire. Other such species on that side of North America are giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum), western larch (Larix occidentalis), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), and ponderosa (Pinus ponderosa).

The understory of such forests, however, usually burns more completely and therefore relies on fire resilience from a suite of abilities to regrow after fire. One approach is resprouting from rhizomes and tubers which remain unburnt underground. Another is establishment of a seedbank which germinates in response to fire and adaptation of the germinants to succeed on burnt sites. A third is good dispersal of seed from adjacent unburnt areas into burnt areas and similar adaptation to recolonize burnt sites. Much of what's burning in the image below is bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata), which relies on recolonization.
View attachment 767392

Another fire resilient shrub that's a minority species in the above image and a majority one in the below, is snowbrush (Ceanothus velutinus), which both seedbanks and resprouts. The below is a snowbrush patch below ponderosa 15 months after a wildfire showing one growing season's worth of resprouting (the curled leaves are normal for the species). After a second or maybe third growing season it won't look much different from it did before fire as the skeletons of pre-fire snowbrush will be hidden in the regrowth and the remaining scorched leaves will have dropped to the ground.
View attachment 767393

Show: Combustion ;)
Wow!i didn’t know about the fire resistant element. What an amazing complex synergy which requires the destructive to thrive. I didn’t know whether to award you a 👍, check, “I” or ❤. Need to see if Amin can work on allowing multiples. :)
 

CD77

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Show: Fluidity
 

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