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Shooting the moon question

Discussion in 'Astrophotography' started by jcm5, Jul 28, 2015.

  1. jcm5

    jcm5 Mu-43 Veteran

    212
    May 12, 2014
    USA
    I tried shooting the moon for the first time yesterday with the 45-175mm (I know it's somewhat short for this, but it's as far as I got at the moment...):

    19452039853_7998197fdd_c.
    Moonlit
    by M, on Flickr

    My question is, what is the best way to focus? I tried using manual focus on the EM5 ii but the moon is just so bright, the peaking doesn't even help (I suppose the object is too far/bright?) and I've tried to set focus to infinity, but I'm not sure if this is the right way to go either. I tried to zoom in on my picture during processing and it seems a bit out of focus, though again I don't know if that's a product of the focal length or my own error. Any suggestions? Thanks in advance!
     
  2. tkc9789

    tkc9789 Mu-43 Veteran

    339
    Dec 8, 2013
    Dallas, TX
    This is one I shot yesterday with the Stylus-1. I usually dial exposure down by 1.5 to 2 stops then focus on the moon. Or I'll foucs to infinity, then switch to MF, compose and take the shot, (without touching focus ring again).
    STY00620.JPG
     
  3. MadMarco

    MadMarco Mu-43 Veteran

    298
    Oct 30, 2014
    Guildford, England
    Using AF with the moon usually works OK for me if I'm using a telephoto lens. Alternatively if I'm using my telescope or taking multiple exposures I'll use a combination of manual focus, MF Assist - Magnify On and then set the camera to fully manual, ISO 200. Setting the aperture to somewhere around f/5.6 or f/8 will usually bring out the best in most lenses from an IQ stand and then adjust the shutter speed accordingly.

    Both these shots look pretty well in focus to me although it's hard to tell without the original images.

    It's quite tricky to get the moon pin sharp. Due to atmospheric disturbance if you look at the moon through a good telescope, then the surface moves around constantly like looking through heat haze.