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shooting in bulb mode and not in livebulb?

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by travelbug, Apr 26, 2016.

  1. travelbug

    travelbug Mu-43 Regular

    136
    Oct 20, 2014
    i believe ive done it before, but ive seemed to forgotten how to shoot in pure/normal bulb mode, mainly because ive been experimenting with the live modes.

    the live modes are interesting but they can add a fair amount of noise to the picture so i would rather shoot in pure bulb when i can. problem is, i forgot how :)
     
  2. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Buried in exposure menu is some Live Bulb / Time settings. Just turn Live Bulb off there.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. travelbug

    travelbug Mu-43 Regular

    136
    Oct 20, 2014
    thanks, i forgot about that and the manual wasnt much help either
     
  4. TNcasual

    TNcasual Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 2, 2014
    Knoxville, TN
    Interestingly, I feel that Live Composite produces very noise-free images.

    I always thought that taking the initial image as close to black as possible helped eliminate noise in the subsequent composite.
     
  5. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    I'll just ask the question, why does it matter if LiveBulb is turned on? It has not impact on the final image, and if your bulb exposure exceeds the maximum number of "updates" that the rear LCD can show, the exposure still continues on, and you simply stop it when the exposure has been timed correctly, doesn't it?
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. travelbug

    travelbug Mu-43 Regular

    136
    Oct 20, 2014
    of the 3, live composite has the least noise, but its application is mostly for for evening shots with light trails. live time and bulb give better images for long exposures with clouds or water but both modes can have some nasty noise in the darker portions of the picture.

    pure bulb and time modes will give you the most noise free images for long exposures but you do risk getting overblown pictures, but this can be corrected (to different extents ) by stacking or layer/masking.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  7. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    Yeah, I did a 2 minute LiveTime exposure on my E-M1 and was shocked at how terrible the noise was, yet the 5 minute bulb exposure on my GH4 was WORLDS better. It has to be something with the IBIS not allowing proper heat dissipation from the sensor.
     
  8. TNcasual

    TNcasual Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 2, 2014
    Knoxville, TN
    It can be used more than that.

    Thanks for those explanations.
     
  9. travelbug

    travelbug Mu-43 Regular

    136
    Oct 20, 2014
  10. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    I don't think it's the IBIS. The E-M5 does much better than the E-M1 and that's got IBIS too. The E-M1 sensor has a bad rep for long exposure noise.
     
  11. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    But the E-M5 II, which is rumored to use a Sony sensor, does much worse than the original E-M5. Maybe not quite as bad as the E-M1, but not nearly as good as the Mk.I version.

    I also don't believe it's solely due to the Panasonic sensors, as I get much better results with my GH4, which uses a Panasonic sensor. The difference there is that the GH4 doesn't have IBIS, and actually has a heat sink mounted directly to the sensor to help deal with the heat from the 4K video (they have obviously found a way around that from a design limitation standpoint with the GX80, but it was an issue back in 2013 when the GH4 was being developed).

    My guess is that it has more to do with the IBIS than the sensor, but it's obvious that the sensor also plays a role in it as well. It would be great to have this issue fixed on the E-M1 Mk.II, because it's so bad that I won't use my E-M1 for long exposures, which is a shame given all of the great long exposure tools available with the Live Bulb/Time/Comp modes.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  12. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    Yes, they're all good points. I guess the reality is somewhat complex.
     
  13. Ross the fiddler

    Ross the fiddler Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Its possible the difference is the GH4 does better because of the heatsink, because I think the E-M1 & GH4 use pretty much the same sensor. The Sony sensors do have better on-chip noise management.

    Also, are you talking about the use with Noise Reduction OFF (which it would be if Drive Mode was left set to sequential drive, although once in Bulb it isn't).
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2016
  14. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    I always have noise reduction turned off, which should not be confused with long exposure noise reduction (LENR) or dark frame subtraction, which I leave on.
     
  15. Ross the fiddler

    Ross the fiddler Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I'm not confused but Olympus do call that Noise Filter (& Noise Reduction is Dark Frame Subtraction).
     
  16. travelbug

    travelbug Mu-43 Regular

    136
    Oct 20, 2014
    where/hpw do i toggle lenr? i swear, this olympus menu system is one of the most unintuitive ive ever used.
     
  17. BeyondTheLines

    BeyondTheLines Mu-43 Veteran

    262
    Sep 23, 2012
    Spain/USA
    Patrick
    Custom Menu G: Noise Reduction
     
  18. BeyondTheLines

    BeyondTheLines Mu-43 Veteran

    262
    Sep 23, 2012
    Spain/USA
    Patrick
    This is interesting, I've used Live Time quite a bit for long exposures but if this is true I'll be using regular bulb mode from now on. Any noise improvement for long exposures is more than welcome.
     
  19. ijm5012

    ijm5012 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 2, 2013
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Ian
    I wasn't saying it meaning that you were confused, it was more in the sense that Olympus' naming structure really doesn't translate well. IMO, noise reduction (the kind where you're actually reducing noise in high ISO JPEGs) should be called "noise reduction", and what we're talking about for long exposures should be called "long exposure noise reduction" or "dark frame subtraction". That would make it more clear to users IMO.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1