1. Reminder: Please use our affiliate links for holiday shopping!

Shooting a wedding with a GX1 and kit lens

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by craniac, Aug 3, 2013.

  1. craniac

    craniac Mu-43 Regular

    64
    Jul 26, 2013
    Orem, Utah.
    Mark Crane
    I'm going to a coworker's wedding reception this evening and bringing my Panasonic GX1. It's the camera that's 1/7th of the GX7. I have a GF3 14-42mm kit lens f/3.5-?

    However, in the mail today I'm getting an adapter for an OLY 4/3 150mm lens, and a 14mm GF3 kit lens.

    I have no idea what I'm doing, and have just been shooting with the IA turned on in aperture mode. I'm hoping to just capture a few candids and print up the best one as a small present. None of these lenses are especially fast, and the reception is inside an LDS chapel gymnasium.

    As long as I don't physically hurt or embarrass anyone and get one good picture I'll consider the night a success. Oh crap, I have to charge my second battery...
     
  2. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    Good Luck.
     
  3. craniac

    craniac Mu-43 Regular

    64
    Jul 26, 2013
    Orem, Utah.
    Mark Crane
    Ha ha! I'm sure I'll end up with something like this:

    xBFfgTA.

    One of my college buddies hired someone who specialized in candid wedding shots. They were the greatest pictures I'd ever seen. My friend described him as a terminator with five cameras hanging off of him, instinctively shooting the entire evening and producing touching and hilarious results.

    Update: I ended up not going because my wife decided that those 30 minutes were better spent repairing the bathroom tile. Also, I got the OM 150mm lens attached with the adapter, but I can't seem to manually focus it. Or focus it in any manner. The camera also can't detect the lens and I had to change the settings to "shoot with no lens" or something similar.
     
  4. beanedsprout

    beanedsprout Mu-43 Veteran

    429
    Apr 13, 2013
    north central Ohio
    What does the IA button do? Besides turn a little blue light on?
     
  5. Ulfric M Douglas

    Ulfric M Douglas Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 6, 2010
    Northumberland
    Next time you're permitted to go to a wedding reception instead of fix a life-threatening emergency tile (get a grip!) take your GX1 and 14mm pancake, use "A" mode and set it at widest aperture. Auto-ISO. Discreet job done.

    or alternatively

    "P" mode. Flip up the flash, hold it with your finger to bounce the light off white ceilings. Job done.
     
  6. qoo77

    qoo77 Mu-43 Regular

    28
    Jan 25, 2013
    I think sometimes we worry too much abt our equipment rather than framing beautifully and telling a story with the photos. :p
     
  7. craniac

    craniac Mu-43 Regular

    64
    Jul 26, 2013
    Orem, Utah.
    Mark Crane
    Thank you for the advice. The problem with these gymnasium receptions is there are no windows, flourescent lights, and high ceilings so the bounce trick doesn't work.

    Note: the problem with the 150mm lens is that it is focus by wire and I have a non-electrical adapter.
     
  8. rklepper

    rklepper Mu-43 Top Veteran

    733
    Dec 19, 2012
    Iowa, USA
    Robert
    I would personally never bring a camera to a wedding, unless I was the photographer.
     
  9. craniac

    craniac Mu-43 Regular

    64
    Jul 26, 2013
    Orem, Utah.
    Mark Crane
    That's probably a good idea. This is the after-wedding gathering, and it's a little less formal. Apparently there was an accordion player.
     
  10. Ulfric M Douglas

    Ulfric M Douglas Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 6, 2010
    Northumberland
    Are you sure it's OM-fit then?
    Could it be an awfully rare lens for the Olympus 101 Autofocus SLR?
    Blimey I just read the Camerapedia page ... doesn't mention an AF-only 150mm either.
    So : :confused:

    Post a photo of your lens and the mount?
     
  11. craniac

    craniac Mu-43 Regular

    64
    Jul 26, 2013
    Orem, Utah.
    Mark Crane
    Well, I'm packing it up and have an RMA from the vendor. I'll just order stock lenses until I know what I'm doing. Right now I'm in a bit of a crunch as we are moving overseas for three years so I don't have time to experiment.
     
  12. Kingsfan

    Kingsfan Mu-43 Top Veteran

    834
    Nov 22, 2010
    highland park, CA
    Q
    yeah cause they always ask for the pics later, but they paid some other guy a bunch of money for his...

    well i still bring my camera and just think of it as practice
     
  13. craniac

    craniac Mu-43 Regular

    64
    Jul 26, 2013
    Orem, Utah.
    Mark Crane
    We hired a photographer but he wanted us to tell him which posed pictures to take, so we have almost nothing of the guests. It was almost twenty years ago and I don't really care at this point, but I like to take pictures of the guests shoving cake in their mouths, or anything that doesn't look forced, and then just give them a CD with the images later. I suppose it would be better to pick out the good ones and put them in a small album.

    If I could go back in time I'd pay two professionals, one for posed and one for candids.
     
  14. flash

    flash Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 29, 2010
    1 hour from Sydney Australia.
    Gordon
    Each to their own of course. And there's something to be said for just enjoying the moment. But as a full time wedding photographer, I see very few issues with guests and cameras being an issue. It's part of what we do in the 21st century.

    I know some working photographers get really precious about this, especially those clinging to the old selling reprints business model. But if you're a guest at a wedding I shoot go for it. Just remeber the rules of etiquette. Keep out of the pros way. Don't distract the bride and groom and remember they're not there as your models and they've probably already had enough of me. Don't shoot to build your portfolio (that's how you piss people off by being pushy). Don't try and solicit business or hand out your home made business cards. Don't shoot what you think the pro will shoot. That's his job. Let him do it. For Gods sake don't post photos on your Facebook page using your business name and with a watermark on them. A nd last but not least, if in doubt, ask.

    Do be a ninja photographer. Do look for details and awesome candid moments. Do limit your gear (off camera lighting is NOT appropriate - yes I've seen it). Do give a set to the bride and groom. After all you got a free meal and booze. Do check what exclusivity deal the bride and groom have signed with the photographer as you may find there are commercial limitations the b&g have agreed to. Do remember to have a good time.

    Another thing you can do is if the bride and groom have no video dudette is to shoot some for them. Maybe you can be a cinimatographer for a day.

    Even though there are two of us and we provide full coverage (contemporary and candids), we can't be everywhere all the time.

    Gordon