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Shoot Less, Share More

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by Biro, Apr 4, 2013.

  1. Biro

    Biro Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 8, 2011
    Jersey Shore
    Steve
  2. RichDesmond

    RichDesmond Mu-43 Veteran

    356
    Nov 18, 2011
    Some truth there, especially this;

    "I am happy that I've learned to pull out my camera and put it between me and my family and friends less often. Far better that I actually take those times and events to be totally present in the moment and not busy translating them for future consumption. Better to be engaged as part of the memory rather than sidelined as its documenter."

    I also remember a paragraph in a Colin Fletcher book, I think "The Complete Backpacker" where he talks about being in a remote part of the Grand Canyon, a place he knew he would never revisit, and his camera breaking. He talked about being really angry at first, but then enjoying (and I'm paraphrasing) "...the freedom from the tyranny of film, and the ability to preserve the images in the finer emulsion of my memory..."

    There is of course a balance here, there are certainly times in my life that I wish I had more pictures of.
     
  3. aukirk

    aukirk Mu-43 Regular

    183
    Sep 9, 2012
    Thanks for sharing... that is a really interesting post and perspective. Can't say I agree with everything he said, but it is definitely important to be present and not just capturing.

    Along the lines of one comment he made, about the lack of ever obtaining a portrait of his recently deceased friend, reminded me of something else I read about how you really should try to capture the occasional portrait of family and close friends, as they can be very personally gratifying in events like these. I know that I rarely take portraits of friends and family (other than kids or the parents with their kids), as it is a bit socially awkward. But when I have asked them to take a minute and pose, I do think it is rewarding.