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Fred S

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Sig

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Sig

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Sig

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This is a terrible photo (edited with desperation) of brolgas, but I'll tell you why I'm posting it.
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A few weeks ago we were driving around in bushland, when we came across a mallee fowl, which we had never seen in the wild before, and certainly hadn't expected to see in our area. I was so astonished, it took a few moments before I even thought to get my camera; when I did, I couldn't get a 'good' shot, so I didn't take one.

Afterwards I realised that, sometimes, you just have to take the shot you've got: the conservation group we reported the sighting to was very excited, as mallee fowl had not been reported in that range for a long time. Having included even a 'bad' photo would have given our report greater weight.

When I saw these brolgas near the road, I quickly pulled over, put the window down, turned off the motor, and shot at full zoom (112mm on Fujifilm X30), ignoring any concerns about getting a 'good' photo, as I seldom see brolgas.

I wouldn't consider it 'good enough' to share here, except to share my lesson!
 
Joined
Apr 20, 2019
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429
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Tasmania
This is a terrible photo (edited with desperation) of brolgas, but I'll tell you why I'm posting it.View attachment 743715
A few weeks ago we were driving around in bushland, when we came across a mallee fowl, which we had never seen in the wild before, and certainly hadn't expected to see in our area. I was so astonished, it took a few moments before I even thought to get my camera; when I did, I couldn't get a 'good' shot, so I didn't take one.

Afterwards I realised that, sometimes, you just have to take the shot you've got: the conservation group we reported the sighting to was very excited, as mallee fowl had not been reported in that range for a long time. Having included even a 'bad' photo would have given our report greater weight.

When I saw these brolgas near the road, I quickly pulled over, put the window down, turned off the motor, and shot at full zoom (112mm on Fujifilm X30), ignoring any concerns about getting a 'good' photo, as I seldom see brolgas.

I wouldn't consider it 'good enough' to share here, except to share my lesson!
Concur fully
A lot of my work I need a photo of, that can't wait for ideal conditions.
These birds are (to me) beautifully portrayed in their natural (today's) environs.
I like it..

Reminds me of that old poem
Brolgas, brolgas, out on the plain,
Dance for me, dance for me, once again;
 

Brownie

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Sep 3, 2018
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SE Michigan
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Tim
This is a terrible photo (edited with desperation) of brolgas, but I'll tell you why I'm posting it.View attachment 743715
A few weeks ago we were driving around in bushland, when we came across a mallee fowl, which we had never seen in the wild before, and certainly hadn't expected to see in our area. I was so astonished, it took a few moments before I even thought to get my camera; when I did, I couldn't get a 'good' shot, so I didn't take one.

Afterwards I realised that, sometimes, you just have to take the shot you've got: the conservation group we reported the sighting to was very excited, as mallee fowl had not been reported in that range for a long time. Having included even a 'bad' photo would have given our report greater weight.

When I saw these brolgas near the road, I quickly pulled over, put the window down, turned off the motor, and shot at full zoom (112mm on Fujifilm X30), ignoring any concerns about getting a 'good' photo, as I seldom see brolgas.

I wouldn't consider it 'good enough' to share here, except to share my lesson!

Nothing wrong with a grab shot. I like it!
 

RaymondB

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Dec 14, 2016
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274
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Raymond Bong
That is very nice
Interested how close you were and cropped?
I'm an EM5II user but looked at G9 and EM1
You've certainly captured that very nicely
I think it should be about 1 meter or 2 before me. I was trying very hard to take some macro shots with this oly60mm lens on my G9.

Image is tightly cropped. Append the original image for comparison.

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Thank you for your kind words.
 
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