Seeking lens advice for visit to Petra

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by Roger.Cavanagh, Apr 25, 2014.

  1. Roger.Cavanagh

    Roger.Cavanagh Mu-43 Rookie

    19
    Jan 31, 2013
    London, UK
    Roger Cavanagh
    I'm off to Petra next week with my E-M1. I don't want to take more kit than necessary, so I'm trying to decide on the most suitable three (zoom) lenses. I've pretty much decided on the O12-40 and the P35-100. But I don't know enough about the geography of Petra to determine whether I'd be better with a wide-angle—P7-14—or telephoto P100-300.

    Does anyone who's been have an thoughts?

    Thanks.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. An ultra-wide angle lens might be handy, particularly in some of the tighter parts of the siq and in front of the treasury to get some wider perspectives, but the 12-40mm should still serve you well. There are a few spots such as the facade of the treasury again where you might want a longer telephoto lens for picking out smaller details but I wouldn't choose such a lens over a UWA zoom.



    8502821320_e10c176ec5_b.
    C50D-IMG_2156-PR Canon EOS 50D Petra Jordan by Nic (Luckypenguin), on Flickr



    8370765644_d3ae46e1ed_b.
    C50D-IMG_2104-PR Canon EOS 50D Petra Jordan by Nic (Luckypenguin), on Flickr



    8401622853_c05183c949_b.
    C50D-IMG_2116-PR Canon EOS 50D Petra Jordan by Nic (Luckypenguin), on Flickr



    8411062747_ba18bb48a4_b.
    C50D-IMG_2118-PR Canon EOS 50D Petra Jordan by Nic (Luckypenguin), on Flickr
     
    • Like Like x 6
  3. Robert

    Robert Mu-43 Rookie

    16
    Oct 16, 2012
    Hi Roger,

    A wide-angle or even a fisheye-lens are great when you walk into Petra. The entrance canyon is very narrow. Also inside Petra you'll need a wide or standardzoom.
    The lenses I would take are a Samyang 7,5mm, a P14 and P20.

    Don't take a horse or donkey!! It's much nicer to walk into the canyon.

    Robert
     
  4. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    +1

    For a 1 lens solution a 9-18 would work well. If you back up too far at the Treasury, for example, you will be in someone's tourist shop. For a second lens, a 14-140 mm would be a good choice. 100-300 will be too long for most shots.
     
  5. Roger.Cavanagh

    Roger.Cavanagh Mu-43 Rookie

    19
    Jan 31, 2013
    London, UK
    Roger Cavanagh
    7-14 it is then. Thanks for the input, guys. And great shots, Nic.
     
  6. One suggestion is scope out Petra first via Google Earth and an App such as Photographers Ephemeresis(sp) or Sun Seeker. If my memory is correct both the latter will allow the suns track and elevation to be overlain on a satellite image.

    As an aside, while in Jordan, visit the Roman Ruins at Jerash, an old friends home town.

    Jerash Ruins - Jerash - Reviews of Jerash Ruins - TripAdvisor
    www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-...
    Rating: 4.5 - ‎452 reviews
    The ruins of the ancient city of Gerasa in Jerash, Jordan are well worth a visit. We visited recently on what seemed to be ...
     
  7. jloden

    jloden Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 15, 2012
    Hunterdon County, NJ
    Jay
    Too funny - I was *just* saying a couple of hours ago to my wife that I wanted to add Petra to our list places to visit someday. Probably be a while before we can make that particular trip but I'd love to see it in person eventually.

    Have a great trip Roger!
     
  8. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    Jerash is an interesting and photogenic spot. If you have not been to other Roman cities like Ephesus, I'd agree/suggest making Jerash a priority. If it would be your fourth or fifth pile of Roman ruins, it is probably less important.
     
  9. elavon

    elavon Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 1, 2012
    Tel Aviv Israel
    Ehud
    Welcome to the neighborhood. Petra is a great place. The best time to take pictures is during early morning or sunset during the rest of the day the sun is very strong and you will have hard time getting the beauty of the place. Check with the local how you can stay late at El Deir ("The Monastery") for sunset shots.

    As the rest of the people say, in Petra go wide, you also might consider getting a travel tripod for shooting inside some of the burial caves.

    Off topic, for great Arabic food go to the local restaurants up hill at Wadi Mousa they serve better food at cheaper prices then the restaurants next to Petra.
     
  10. Swandy

    Swandy Mu-43 Veteran

    362
    Dec 15, 2009
    Thanks for all this. My wife and I are doing a tour of Israel and Jordan this fall and Petra is one of our stops. (BIG Indiana Jones Fan!!!)
    And thanks for the tip about Jerash. That is not one of the actual stops on the tour but is apparently a optional side trip. Will check it out.
     
  11. Jerash is a nicely preserved set of Roman ruins and if you're in the vicinity of Amman a visit to the Citadel might also be worthwhile, but my two Jordan highlights were Petra and Wadi Rum.
     
  12. spirito

    spirito New to Mu-43

    1
    Mar 18, 2011
    Same here. We ha d alot of time and enjoyed it all. Great country, scenic, warm and friendly people and beautiful food.

    Just go ;)
     
  13. Dave Jenkins

    Dave Jenkins Mu-43 Veteran

    Petra involves a LOT of walking. Keep your kit light, as in one body and two lenses. The 7-14/9-18 and the 14-140/14-150 will cover everything.

    Actually, it was Petra that got me started on M4/3s.