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SD card corruption

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by tonyturley, Aug 8, 2018.

  1. tonyturley

    tonyturley Mu-43 Top Veteran

    623
    Nov 19, 2014
    This evening I removed the SanDisk Extreme 32G card from my GX85 and inserted it into my computer's SD card reader. The display window popped up like it usually does when I insert a card, but then it disappeared, and the icon on the side of the screen indicating that a card was inserted also vanished. I tried inserting the card again, but no response. I tried a separate card reader in a USB port. Nada. I tried a separate laptop. Nothing, except the second machine gave me an error saying the card was corrupted and needed to be formatted. I tried inserting the card back in the camera, and also got a prompt to format the card, which I didn't do.

    It's disappointing because I had several nice images from earlier today that I hadn't transferred to my hard drive yet. When I last used the camera, the images seemed to record OK, and I was able to view them in playback. I'm hoping it's a card issue, and my camera isn't on the blink. Anyone else experience something similar?
     
    • Sad Sad x 1
  2. Bif

    Bif Mu-43 Top Veteran

    624
    May 28, 2012
    San Angelo TX
    Bruce Foreman
    How often do you do a deep/low level format on the card? The camera only offers a quick format which does nothing but zero out the File Allocation Table on media. If this is the only way you format (in camera) time after time, data "clutter" accumulates on the media and ultimately often leads to what you just experienced.

    About every 5 to 10 use cycles I format in a PC with SDFORMATTER, which comes in both PC and Mac versions. This software is free and was developed by the folks who brought out the SD media.
     
    • Informative Informative x 3
  3. Stanga

    Stanga Mu-43 Top Veteran

    652
    Oct 16, 2016
    It might not be related, but my son had an SD card go faulty on him in his Sony camera, or after he tried to download the content on his PC. At the same time my USB card reader has gone faulty. All this happened after recent updates to Windows.
     
  4. Balinov

    Balinov Mu-43 Regular

    144
    Oct 8, 2015
    Dublin
    Balazs
    Do not format the card or attempt it. Try with a different reader, different USB port on the computer

    Try Revuca or the recovery software SanDisk often bundles with its cards to recover.

    Near the same happened to my mother's card and Revuca managed to recover all the 1000+ jpegs
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  5. Keeth101

    Keeth101 Mu-43 Regular

    83
    Jan 5, 2018
    If it still shows pictures when it's in the camera, then get your pictures off it direct from the camera, then, and only then, try other things.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. tonyturley

    tonyturley Mu-43 Top Veteran

    623
    Nov 19, 2014
    I haven't done a deep format on it recently. Thanks for the tip.

    This was on a Linux machine. I'm suspecting the built-in card reader may be faulty.

    I haven't done anything with the card. Thanks for the tips. I'll go check out Recuva.

    The camera unfortunately cannot even read the card now.

    I appreciate all the replies and tips. I'll see what I can do today.
     
  7. Keeth101

    Keeth101 Mu-43 Regular

    83
    Jan 5, 2018
    If the card itself is recognized in the computer but no pictures showing on it, then use any one of various recovery programs. If the card isn't recognized at all .... then I'm afraid you are in trouble. I had a Memorex card fail on me and as it wasn't recognized in anything I tried unfortunately there was nothing else I could do. (Yes, I could have paid loadsa money and sent it away for experts to try, but the pictures weren't worth that much so all was lost).
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  8. Balinov

    Balinov Mu-43 Regular

    144
    Oct 8, 2015
    Dublin
    Balazs
    An extra wild idea, try to make an image of the sd card (like we used to do ages ago with dvds and DVD decrypter) mount the iso to windows and run the recovery Sw on the mounted image. Might save you tons of time
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  9. tonyturley

    tonyturley Mu-43 Top Veteran

    623
    Nov 19, 2014
    I tried it on a third machine, which says it doesn't recognize the file system. Recuva couldn't read the card. I'll likely end up deep formatting the card and just writing off the images.
     
  10. Zman

    Zman Mu-43 Veteran

    224
    Oct 11, 2016
    Thanks for the tip on this software. I have downloaded it but have a question. Should I select the "Quick" or "Overwrite" format method.
     
  11. Bif

    Bif Mu-43 Top Veteran

    624
    May 28, 2012
    San Angelo TX
    Bruce Foreman
    The "Quick" option is the same as the camera formatting, zero's out the FAT and leaves the file data itself still where the camera put it. The sectors are "available" and subsequent file data recorded will tend to overwrite some of the data there. This is where the data "clutter" begins, it gets worse as more quick formats followed by files overwriting what's there.

    The "Overwrite" option is "deep" or "low level" format. This is what I select. Now, I don't do this with every card use, only about every 5-10 uses. Or just before an important project. I also mostly use SanDisk Extreme Pro media although with the GH5 I'm trying Angelbird brand as SanDisk has yet to offer a V90 card.
     
  12. Christop82

    Christop82 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    875
    Sep 10, 2016
    I’ll be surprised if it’s any good after formatting. I have had one card fail, and it wouldn’t read even after formatting.
    I’ve learned to only buy sd cards from big box stores or reputable camera stores. Ebay and Amazon are full of generic clones that are much more likely to fail.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. tonyturley

    tonyturley Mu-43 Top Veteran

    623
    Nov 19, 2014
    I haven't formatted it yet. This is a genuine SanDisk card that I've only had a short while. :hmmm:
     
  14. Bif

    Bif Mu-43 Top Veteran

    624
    May 28, 2012
    San Angelo TX
    Bruce Foreman
    It may not be genuine. SanDisk is the most counterfeited brand SD card and some of these even make it into big box stores. Contact SanDisk by email, they will want a copy of your purchase reciept and they will ask you to read some printed stuff off the card and send that to them. SanDisk will then send you a Return Allowance Number and label to send the card to them. If they determine it to be genuine they will replace it at no charge as SanDisk media cards are warranted for the life of the product.

    If they determine it to be counterfeit you are SOL (somewhat outta luck).

    I've had one replaced that way, the write protect switch fell off.

    The only card I've had be corrupted was due to a built in card reader going bad. The pictures and video files copied over to the computer OK but when I tried to also copy the files over to a second drive that's when things went south. That card did format OK when I use an external reader and did a deep format on it.
     
  15. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    Sorry, OWT. Do you have a technical citation that would support your statement? Specifically what is this "clutter" and how does it affect the card?

    It is true that quick formatting does not erase data blocks but they are all marked "unused" and are available to be rewritten as needed. It doesn't matter that they are not erased IOW. It's been a long time since I messed with file structures but I think the only time a complete format might be needed is if the File Allocation Table itself got damaged somehow, like by a runaway or rogue program.

    To the OP: Check and make sure the electrical contacts on the card are clean and shiny. The eraser usually supplied on a #2 wood pencil makes a good contact cleaner because it contains some mild abrasive compounds. Use it dry or with some isopropyl alcohol. You might get lucky.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  16. tkbslc

    tkbslc Super Moderator

    I would throw it away. A healthy card should not corrupt the file system. And cards are cheap as coffee these days.
     
  17. Stanga

    Stanga Mu-43 Top Veteran

    652
    Oct 16, 2016
    Not the UHS-II cards that I bought. At around £50 for 32GB for those 300MB/s cards it would be tears all round if one suddenly decided to stop working.
     
  18. Bif

    Bif Mu-43 Top Veteran

    624
    May 28, 2012
    San Angelo TX
    Bruce Foreman
    This has been covered in several articles I've read. This is from the yodot photo recovery site, I found it with a quick search but it states it in fairly simple form:

    "Many users get the fragmentation error while using SD cards. When SD card saves new file, it breaks the file into many number of bits. Hence, data ends up in spreading all over the card. As information of one file is stored on many spots within the card memory, the card is in fragmented state. When you access data from fragmented card, it has to pull every bit from each location. This is generally very tough than fetching one constant block of data from a sole position on the card. This may slow down the processing speed of card and cause fragment errors."

    A simpler explanation. Quick format reinitializes the File Allocation Table usually by replacing the first two characters of the filename with some null character. This makes all of the allocated sectors available for re-use, but the data files are still there. New files may not fully overwrite existing data. This results in a bit of fragmentation with small "chunks" of non overwritten data in affected sectors. With further overwrites this fragmentation compounds and begins to slow down media access. Eventually this can corrupt the card.

    A few years ago there was a lengthy discussion on a forum about the difference in formatting between m4/3 and brands like Canon. Canon offered both quick and deep format options. Those who used nothing but quick format experienced significantly more media failures than those who use periodic deep format. A few on a Canon forum had purchased new cards and never did anything but quick format. There came a day when these individuals found they got no readback in camera, or first some files became unreadable but they continued using the medial and quickly lost everything. In some cases reformatting in computer with deep/low level format made the media reusable again.

    I admit much of what I've read on this is largely anecdotal but I've followed SD card reliablility since 2008. But following what I advised on formatting, I've lost no data and only had two instances of SD card problems. One the write protect tab fell off (SanDisk replaced the card under warrantee, the other was a built in reader that went bad (got lucky and got the video and jpegs off it just before it went south).
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  19. tkbslc

    tkbslc Super Moderator

    Most of us aren't doing RAW 4K video capture, though. I just paid $13 shipped for a Lexar 32GB 95MB/s card, which is already overkill for most purposes.
     
  20. BosseBe

    BosseBe Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    987
    Aug 7, 2015
    Stockholm, Sweden
    I don't know coffee prices in Utah but I doubt the price is comparable, specially if you talk about a cup of coffee.

    SanDisk Extreme Pro SDXC Class 10 UHS-I Class 3 95MB/s 64GB 371 SEK $41
    SanDisk Extreme Pro SDXC Class 10 UHS-II Class 3 300MB/s 64GB 1279 SEK $142

    But not using the card again is sound advice, getting SanDisk to replace it sounds like the way to go.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
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