Screw thread on FL-50R

OzRay

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There's a small flap on the side of the FL-50R flash that covers a recessed screw thread. I have never been able to find out what the specific purpose of this thread is for, but I suspect that it's designed to enable the flash to be attached to a stand or other mount, rather than the hot shoe, and potentially providing a stronger mount and ability to mount multiple units. However, it doesn't use the standard 1/4" thread, which kind of refutes that idea. The manual gives no clues, so has anyone ever found a definitive reason for the screw thread?
 

Ross the fiddler

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There's a small flap on the side of the FL-50R flash that covers a recessed screw thread. I have never been able to find out what the specific purpose of this thread is for, but I suspect that it's designed to enable the flash to be attached to a stand or other mount, rather than the hot shoe, and potentially providing a stronger mount and ability to mount multiple units. However, it doesn't use the standard 1/4" thread, which kind of refutes that idea. The manual gives no clues, so has anyone ever found a definitive reason for the screw thread?
It's to use with this (expensive) FL-BK04 Flash bracket. http://www.olympus.com.au/Products/CompactSystem-Cameras/PEN-Flash-System/FL-BK04-Flash-bracket.aspx
 

Mikefellh

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It's $150 in the US, still on the higher end for a basic flash bracket.

Personally I use a "VH flip bracket" which is a lot more flexible for the price.
 

OzRay

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Thanks! I never knew about that, so my initial guess was more or less right. Mind you, there's no way I'd pay even $150 for that simple bracket, but that's the way Olympus rolls. However, it's good to know that the mount is strong enough to hold the flash, as I want to use it on a light stand, rather than using a hot shoe.
 

RDM

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Thanks! I never knew about that, so my initial guess was more or less right. Mind you, there's no way I'd pay even $150 for that simple bracket, but that's the way Olympus rolls. However, it's good to know that the mount is strong enough to hold the flash, as I want to use it on a light stand, rather than using a hot shoe.
Its designed to be used in conjunction with the flash being mounted to a shoe, for added vertical support. I would be wary to use just that mount that on a stand, on its side.
I would suggest just getting a cheep cold shoe tripod mount, then a piece of flat steel and bending it then drill the appropriate holes and use a bolt to secure the bracket to the mount . Should cost you less than 5 bucks in parts and that way your sure it will be secure.,

I know for me , I would be upset if I tried to mount it using just the side mount, then had it fail and break off while I was using it ... But that just me .. you make think its ok to just try it ..
I also think that there is a high probability it should be strong enough, but like I said, in my perspective , I would rather be safe than sorry .. Unless it was a cheep flash or an expensive securing solution, then ., i guess it wouldn't matter much.
 

Ross the fiddler

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Its designed to be used in conjunction with the flash being mounted to a shoe, for added vertical support. I would be wary to use just that mount that on a stand, on its side.
I would suggest just getting a cheep cold shoe tripod mount, then a piece of flat steel and bending it then drill the appropriate holes and use a bolt to secure the bracket to the mount . Should cost you less than 5 bucks in parts and that way your sure it will be secure.,

I know for me , I would be upset if I tried to mount it using just the side mount, then had it fail and break off while I was using it ... But that just me .. you make think its ok to just try it ..
I also think that there is a high probability it should be strong enough, but like I said, in my perspective , I would rather be safe than sorry .. Unless it was a cheep flash or an expensive securing solution, then ., i guess it wouldn't matter much.
Yes, the side screw was added stability for the flash (as an improvement over the FL50) since the foot (base) of the flash is plastic & with the weight of the flash the base or foot could be vulnerable to cracking. So yes, you wouldn't use one mount point without the other for the best & most stable result.
 

OzRay

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The whole thing becomes a bugger's muddle, especially considering that you need a hot shoe cable for the camera to control the flash. The one thing has always disappointed me with Olympus flashes is that they have not provided a PC sync connector. Nikon/Canon all have one on their flash units, at least the higher end ones. Even the flash bracket (FL-BK01) has a connector for a PC sync cable.
 

OzRay

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I just did a test with the FL-50R (including my beauty dish) on the Olympus off-camera flash holder and used the controller flash that comes with the E-M1 and it was able to provide TTL flash with perfect lighting. Some tests that I'd done previously, had me turning the flash sensors toward the camera for the wireless to work every time, so this is actually quite interesting. More testing required. It seems that Olympus has developed it's wireless flash control far better than I'd, and perhaps many other, had given them credit.
 

Ross the fiddler

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I just did a test with the FL-50R (including my beauty dish) on the Olympus off-camera flash holder and used the controller flash that comes with the E-M1 and it was able to provide TTL flash with perfect lighting. Some tests that I'd done previously, had me turning the flash sensors toward the camera for the wireless to work every time, so this is actually quite interesting. More testing required. It seems that Olympus has developed it's wireless flash control far better than I'd, and perhaps many other, had given them credit.
If the subject is reflective in those circumstances then the light level of the triggering flash won't need to be so high (if close enough), but if it is dark colours then triggering might be less reliable as the sensor on the front of the FL50R flash may not receive the trigger flash light sufficiently. A snoot reflector on the front of the trigger flash pointing towards the FL50R flash would help get around that though.

Also, the FL50R flash having a swivel head can allow the front of the flash be facing towards the trigger flash (on camera) while the head is pointing at the subject.
 

OzRay

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If the subject is reflective in those circumstances then the light level of the triggering flash won't need to be so high (if close enough), but if it is dark colours then triggering might be less reliable as the sensor on the front of the FL50R flash may not receive the trigger flash light sufficiently. A snoot reflector on the front of the trigger flash pointing towards the FL50R flash would help get around that though.

Also, the FL50R flash having a swivel head can allow the front of the flash be facing towards the trigger flash (on camera) while the head is pointing at the subject.
Well, yes, I am aware that the flashes have swivel heads, that's how I've been using the wireless flash.

I did a shot of our bedroom (nothing reflective there) with this configuration and exposure was perfect:

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 

Ross the fiddler

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Well, yes, I am aware that the flashes have swivel heads, that's how I've been using the wireless flash.

I did a shot of our bedroom (nothing reflective there) with this configuration and exposure was perfect:

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
Because your BIG DISH is in the way, then you might need to get a little more creative in ensuring the trigger light can get to the sensor OK (if the walls or surround don't provide sufficient reflection (of the trigger flash) for you. You get this setup in a large dark studio, except for reflective panels you might use, & if you want a model photo with selective lighting with a dark background etc,, then your flash might not trigger so successfully unless you direct the trigger flash light to the FL50R flash sensor (hiding behind that BIG DISH) with a reflector or snoot etc..
 

OzRay

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As I said, the wireless works fine regardless of the subject or lighting. I did one test of the bedroom by switching on the lights, focussing on a point at the back of the room, setting the camera to manual focus, turning off the lights and taking a shot. The exposure was fine. The same applied to a shot of one of our black hounds lying down against a dark brown background.
 

Clint

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Because your BIG DISH is in the way, then you might need to get a little more creative in ensuring the trigger light can get to the sensor OK (if the walls or surround don't provide sufficient reflection (of the trigger flash) for you. You get this setup in a large dark studio, except for reflective panels you might use, & if you want a model photo with selective lighting with a dark background etc,, then your flash might not trigger so successfully unless you direct the trigger flash light to the FL50R flash sensor (hiding behind that BIG DISH) with a reflector or snoot etc..
Olympus Wireless flash is actually pretty incredible. I sometimes use an Apollo soft box with two FL-50Rs outside in full day light and the flash fires even when the front of the Apollo can not be seen from camera position with a FL-600R on it.
 

Ross the fiddler

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Olympus Wireless flash is actually pretty incredible. I sometimes use an Apollo soft box with two FL-500Rs outside in full day light and the flash fires even when the front of the Apollo can not be seen from camera position with a FL-600R on it.
I assume you mean two FL-50Rs (or Panasonic DMW-FL500E )? It does work well, but using the FL-600R as a trigger has got to be better than the inbuilt & FL-LM2 flashes too, although there are three level of trigger flash power selectable with the camera in RC mode. As long as the trigger flash signal light can be read by the controlled flashes by direct light or reflected means is all that matters for successful use.
 
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