Screw-on Front Teleconverter for Moon Shots

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by sprinke, Jun 15, 2011.

  1. sprinke

    sprinke Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 5, 2011
    Pasadena, CA
    Real Name:
    My attempts to shoot the moon last night got me looking around at teleconverter lenses. I know that there is no true teleconverter available for m4/3 right now. I'm talking about the ones that screw on the front.

    Yes, I know that they are optically inferior and will cause vignetting, but I thought one might be fun to play with.

    There is a cheapo one (from everybody's favorite Digital Concepts) that is 67mm and thus would fit in front of my 100-300mm.

    On the other hand, I found an old Canon TC-DC52 for just about the same price. The problem is that the TC-DC52 is 52mm rear thread, so I'd have to do some serious step-down ring action to mount it.

    So here is my question to you, dear friends. Would the (presumably) better optics of the Canon outweigh the light loss compared to the Digital Concepts version? Assuming that all I use this widget for is shooting the moon. Not too worried about vignetting because the moon takes up so little room in the frame anyway.

    Or, do you have other suggestions?
  2. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Canon has the more regarded close-up filter lens, but Nikon has the most popular teleconvert filter lens. I don't (and honestly wouldn't) use either, so I can't give any personal experience, but you're already standing to lose so much quality with the filter that I think it would be well worth investing in the better quality Canon or Nikon glass. I have seen some horrid results from other cheap screw-in filter lenses. I do mean horrible... I think that would be too much of a risk to take, and will probably be throwing your money away.

    PS, I do have a Digital Concepts monopod which I have no real problems with (on the rare occasion that I would use a monopod). So this is nothing against Digital Concepts in particular. ;) I got a deal on my monopod... for $10. Comes with carry case and flip head with level gauge, lol.
  3. MegaPixelTravel

    MegaPixelTravel Mu-43 Regular

    May 14, 2011
    The moon is along way away and the issue you have is your resolution is based on many things. There are environmental factors that will effect your seeing condition and there is the lens/camera.

    For the lens, diameter means a lot. At 300mm and 67mm diameter your likely maxed out your actual visible detail, you can magnify the image all you want but your not likely going to get more detail of the surface. You can do the equivalent in post.

    If you want to get a better image of the moon you will need a larger diameter (77mm for most pro lenses). Often this means telescope.
    The following posts from my blog can show you the difference between dia=77mm at 400mm and dia=100mm at 900mm. In the past I used a 2x teleconverter on a 500mm lens to get 1000 and the results were underwhelming compared to the telescope.
  4. f6cvalkyrie

    f6cvalkyrie Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 12, 2010
    Brussels, Belgium

    I've been using an Olympus B300 (1.7x) screw-on teleconvertor with some success, as you will be able to find in the "show birds" topic, around page 20 !
    Not the cheapest convertor, but optically good, no vignetting to mention !
    And, AF maintained, of course !!!

    I did not use it for moon shots, yet, but I might well do so tonight, since we have a lunar eclipse here in Belgium

    Would like to do a side by side shoot out with the Pana 45-200 + B300 against the Nikon 300/2.8 IF-ED (evt with TC 301).

    Not the fairest of comparisons, I admit :eek::biggrin::eek:

    C U,
  5. dfroelich

    dfroelich Mu-43 Regular

    Nov 15, 2010

    I just held my gf1/20mm up to the eyepiece on my 8" dobsonian telescope. For shooting the moon, you could do well with a <$100 spotting scope. A big aperture is unnecessary since the moon is so bright, even when not full.