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Brownie

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Sep 3, 2018
Messages
1,260
Location
SE Michigan
Real Name
Tim
Yes, I know it's been beat to death, but all of the threads I can find are a few years old. Technology is moving quickly. I also know about online scanners and higher quality scans, so that part out of the way...

I'd like to be able to scan some older slides and negatives, plus new negatives. The ability to scan photos is desired, but not necessarily a must. I have one of those lens mount slide holders, that seems to work ok but is limited.

It's difficult to find real reviews and unbiased opinions that you can trust. Flatbeds suck, spend $12,000, only use online, build yourself this super duper holder...Jeez.

I'd like to keep this around $200, if that's possible. The two I've been looking at are the Epson V600 and the Kodak Scanza, as examples. I am not married to either brand or style.

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I know these things take time to scan. For newer film it won't be an issue, I only shoot a few rolls here and there. The slides will be a pain but it is what it is.

I read a lot about focus problems with the flatbeds and having to set the holders on something.

So, questions:
Is it worth it? (Cost-wise, high quality scans would cover the outlay in about 15-20 rolls)
Which would provide a better result? (Epson's color correction and dust software seems like it'd be helpful.)
Which one do you have/recommend, and why?
What do you hate about it?
 
Joined
Apr 11, 2009
Messages
475
Location
Tempe, AZ
Real Name
Rick
I have an Epson 850, pretty good but not outstanding. I am going to try camera scanning, starting to assemble the extras I will need. You need some kind of backlight source (lightbox or something, perhaps a flash), a film holder, a lens which will focus close enough to "fill the frame", a copy stand or tripod with arm which will allow you to capture the image. From what I have researched, liberating, much faster and not reliant on scanner tech.

PS or similar can invert, or great new plugin for LR:

DSLR Film Scanning: The Secret to Perfect Color Negatives

There are quite a few Youtube videos on this, as well as the general idea.
 

Brownie

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Sep 3, 2018
Messages
1,260
Location
SE Michigan
Real Name
Tim
No LR or PS, ever. There are other color inversion programs out there, and there's a module Darktable.
I've used a camera for copying photos and slides before, so I'm familiar with the concept.
The biggest problem I have with using the camera is the space to leave it set up, or going through all of the setup/tear down gyrations. The idea of being able to have this setting on the computer desk is appealing.

So, thanks, but back to our originally scheduled program.
 

Motmot

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Dec 26, 2016
Messages
48
Location
Thousand Islands, New York
Real Name
Dan Miller
I just ordered one of these, mostly because it is now supported by VueScan:
Pacific Image PrimeFilm XEs 35mm Film & Slide Scanner

It should arrive Monday and hopefully I will get to test it pretty soon.
 

Sawdust

Mu-43 Veteran
Joined
Apr 5, 2018
Messages
269
Location
Missouri, USA
For those of you that have a B&W negative, and would like to make a digital image of it, for less than 10 bucks, here is one way to do it:
******
1. Go to WalMart (where else?) and get two 1/8 inch thick foam cardstocks in the crafts/hobby section.
2. Cut two pieces of the cardstock to about 12 inches by 12 inches or whatever size you want. Make sure they both are exactly the same size.
3. Cut an opening in one piece of the cardstock, that is about 1/8 inch smaller on all sides, than the negative you want to use.
4. Lay the piece you just cut the opening out of on the other piece, and with a pencil, trace this opening on the un-cut cardstock.
5. Cut the opening in the un-cut cardstock. Make sure the two openings match up, when the two pieces of card stock are laid on top of one another.
6. Put both pieces together, making sure the cut openings are the same, and both cardstock pieces are the same, and use blue tape to tape one side of the two pieces together, so that it acts like a hinge, and you can open and close the two pieces, in such a way that the cut-out openings match up.
7. This is your "Negative Holder".
8. Open your Negative Holder, and lay the negative over an opening.
9. Use blue tape, to "fasten" the negative to the card stock. I make sure that I just cover the negative about an 1/8 of an inch on one side only, usually the top. The Blue tape will not hurt the negative edge.
10. When you close the two pieces of card stock together, then, the negative is laying relatively flat.
11. Use short pieces of Blue tape to hold the Negative Holder together. (I just put 3 short pieces on the non-hinge sides.)
12. You now have a Negative Holder, with a negative inside, ready to use.
******
CREATING THE DIGITAL IMAGE

I use an EM-10 with the Oly 60mm macro, and a tripod. My light source is the natural light outside a house window.

******

HOW I CREATE THE DIGITAL IMAGE

1. I tape the negative holder to an exterior window of my house, that does not have a screen on it.
2. I then use a tripod with my camera, positioned in such a way to fill the viewfinder completely. My macro lens allows me to do this to get a great image.
3. It is important to get the lens of the camera "square" to the negative. In other words, straight on to the center of the negative, and at a 90 degree angle. The "plane" of the end of the camera lens must match the "plane" of the negative.
4. Because the negatives I am using are bent, dented, warped, torn, sometimes with pieces missing (not all, but some), I take at least 6 shots of the negative, shooting in different spots on the negative. I shoot RAW, and single point AF. I use my Camera's AF function on the different spots on the negative. The AF grid I have allows me to make very small squares of AF area, so that I can move the single AF area where I want it. (If you cannot do this with your camera, you may not get good results.)
5. I then upload the images to Bridge, in PS CC.
6. Since I shoot RAW, when I open the first of six images in Bridge, the image is deposited in Photoshop's RAW converter. I then open the image in ACR, without any edits (since it is a negative image, it is not viewable at this point, as a finished image), and it is deposited back in Photoshop.
7. I then repeat this with the remaining 5 images.
8. At this point, I have six negative images open in Photoshop.
9. Next, I use Photoshop to "merge" the 6 images, into one image.
10. Next step is to rotate and crop this merged image, if needed.
11. Then I use Photoshop to "invert" the image. This turns it into basically, a B&W image, although not a very good one.
12. I then "flatten" the image, in the layer menu, to make it a single, editable image.
13. Next, I use the "Camera Raw Filter", and edit the merged image in ACR.
14. I then open the image back in Photoshop, and continue to edit. I especially like the Nik suite for this. I don't always use Silver Efex Pro 2, preferring Color Efex Pro 4, and Viveza.
15. I like the "old look", and depending on the image, do not remove all the scratches, spots, etc. I prefer to try to get the image as clear as possible, without too much grain. Grain really doesn't look too bad in most old photos...in my opinion. lol
16. Last, I crop, re-size, etc. to produce a image for social media.

I am not the best at explanations, and if you have questions or suggestions for improvement...have at it.



_DSF3945.jpg
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_DSF3946.jpg
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Oops! I just noticed when uploading, that the settings are not what I use when shooting a negative, in the below example image. I use aperture mode, F11, most of the time. Since I am on a tripod, I let the camera
choose the shutter speed.


_DSF3943.jpg
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Sawdust

Mu-43 Veteran
Joined
Apr 5, 2018
Messages
269
Location
Missouri, USA
These images came from 50 to 65 year old mostly 120 negatives, using the method above.


Bud and Steve_800.jpg
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Dad going to KC_800.jpg
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Two_Girls-and-a_Car_800.jpg
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Stewart Christmas_800.jpg
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WRay

Mu-43 Top Veteran
Joined
May 23, 2012
Messages
707
Location
Riverside, California
Real Name
Ray
Here are some scans from my Epson V700:

Kodak B&W 400 Chromgenic film
Hood-1.jpg
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Kodak Tri-X
5495575962_d3430ae540_o.jpg
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Fuji Superior 400
Woodie1.jpg
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Kodachrome transparency
scan4.jpg
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