Said goodbye to my EM-5 today...

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by silver92b, Jan 8, 2015.

  1. silver92b

    silver92b Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 7, 2013
    Atlanta, GA
    My EM-5 is gone... I sold the EP-5 and the GX7 but I did not miss them as much. I keep thinking that maybe I should have kept it, but I need to pare down the number of cameras and lenses and stuff. My GAS has definitely gotten out of hand and not only impairs finances, but it really hampers my actual photography... I'm thinking that the more cameras and lenses and stuff I buy, the less I use any one of them. Seems that once the GAS kicks in, the actual passion for photography goes down a bit. Sure, I still go out and fire away at people, landscapes, skyscapes and objects, but it seems that each other piece of equipment clamors for my attention and the allure of just one more thing is very compelling.

    I can definitely use the $$ to complement my latest object of fixation, but mostly I recognize that I don't need all those various items to take pictures. I hope I can determine a finite number of lenses that I *need* (hopefully no more than 3)and stop right there. I'm going to keep the EM-1 and probably the 12-40 f2.8 and the PL 35-100 f2.8 I have a few other M43 lenses that I will probably keep since I can't get much for them. My next item on the block will be the DP2-M. I'm going to try to stick with the rangefinder digital camera and for purposes that the Leica is not suitable for, I'll use the EM-1

    It's amazing how many gadgets, bits and pieces have accumulated in my collection. Legacy glass, old 35mm bodies, even a TLR and several old P&S cameras (one was converted to IR). It seems that there is no end of attachments, accessories and add-ons that jump out of the internet at me :eek: Each one promises to improve my photography and yet in the end most sit collecting dust or are forgotten in a drawer. Sometimes I wonder if the GAS is actually a barrier to the art....
     
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  2. manzoid

    manzoid Mu-43 Regular

    137
    Jun 9, 2011
    When I made this realization it led me to plan for fewer, better lenses, rather than more cheap ones. I still have some stuff to sell, and other things I'd like to buy, but reminding myself of this helps me keep from buying things like the 30mm sigma and 14mm panasonic since I already have the 12-35mm f2.8.
     
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  3. hankbaskett

    hankbaskett Mu-43 Regular

    155
    Aug 21, 2012
    I don't think it's all bad, I think that most people take a while to figure out what type of photography they actually enjoy doing, and what they need to do it. That sometimes requires trying some different stuff out!
     
  4. fransglans

    fransglans Mu-43 Top Veteran

    993
    Jun 12, 2012
    Sweden
    gus
    I've been thinking alot about gas lately. its a weird thing, a massive attack on your mind that makes you insecure about your current gear. and it never stops. whatever the new camera or lens is, there's always another one out there that gas presents for you to gather...

    its sound harsh but for me its a pain. for me the conclusion is to realize that this is sick and a expensive and dangerous way to think. make a stand, stand against it.

    Sent from my GT-I9300 using Mu-43 mobile app
     
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  5. silver92b

    silver92b Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 7, 2013
    Atlanta, GA
    Yes, I agree. It's a silly to go and buy duplicate gear just to get one more f stop....

    You have more than a grain of truth there... There is plenty of room for experimentation, and yes, it takes a bit to realize what one really likes.

    You hit the nail on the head. "a massive attack on your mind that makes you insecure about your current gear. and it never stops". The problem that I think most of us have is that we get in the water a little at the time long after we learned how to dive in.... Sneaking on the the ideal thing one really ought to have for the purpose (whatever that might be) is not a good idea. This is probably what drives GAS. It's the fear of taking a plunge and going for the best even after we know what the "best" is for each of us.

    Once I knew that I really like photography and discovered the strengths and weaknesses of each system, I should have studied (for real) and found the best solution for my desire. I already knew that MFT (good as it is) has very real limitations. If I wanted to shoot wildlife or subjects moving in dim light, I had to abandon MFT... But I was enamored and resisted, instead buying more and more expensive lenses and various bodies, all to no avail. The truth is that the MFT crop factor applies not only to the focal length, but also to the aperture *and* the ISO.... Even my expensive F2.8 zooms and the f1.8 and 1.4 primes will never equal the real light gathering of the FF cameras with their native lenses.

    I should have realized this and made some painful choices earlier. The incredible detail that the Foveon sensor gets, comes at a price. The camera is quirky, clunky and slow. The software is a joke. If I want detail of FF and great performance, I have to go with something else. I don't know what I will end up with in the end. I've nickeled and dimed (or more likely, hundreded) myself into a hole. Had I bought the right system long ago, I'd be $$ ahead and getting the results I really wanted.

    I love my EM-1 and the MFT system. It's light, fast, weather sealed and works very nicely, up to its limits. I am very resistant to go with a huge FF DSLR and the gigantic lenses, so I must make a good choice. I think that for now, I will attempt to learn more about the art and go back to basics. That's why I pulled the trigger on the M typ 240 and the excellent 50mm Summilux ASPH. I better learn to take pictures rather than buy more and more bits and pieces that just accumulate. I just must accept that BIF and sports photography are different disciplines and require their own tools. I cannot have everything in one package. Maybe I can get the tools that will do it all, but I just dont want to carry them around. :wink:
     
  6. fransglans

    fransglans Mu-43 Top Veteran

    993
    Jun 12, 2012
    Sweden
    gus
    good luck silver! often a wise move is to buy the best and most expensive stuff from start. that protects the insecureness that we can feel along the way. not saying that the M is the best for all. but it has the muscles to be that for many. I wish you peace for your mind!

    Sent from my GT-I9300 using Mu-43 mobile app
     
  7. hankbaskett

    hankbaskett Mu-43 Regular

    155
    Aug 21, 2012
    And they say money can't buy happiness :wink:

    I'm not certain that I've evolved past GAS, but the best I can say is that lately I've been doing a lot more shooting and reading photographic theory books than I have researching the latest and greatest gear, which is probably a good sign.

    Technology is always going to be there as a distraction, and they keep coming out with these frankly amazing cameras so it's tough not to get distracted. Presumably most of us like this stuff, and things like IBIS, the resolution you get out of a D810, the light sensitivity of an a7s or the image quality they squeeze out of some of the tiny m4/3 lenses are undeniably cool so it's tough not to oooh and aaaah and say "I want to try that out", but if you're serious about photography, ultimately the goal should probably be to get something you're comfortable with and is appropriate for your needs -- whether that's an M240, a D600 or a camera phone -- and use it until it becomes like an appendage and/or breaks and/or maybe see if there's a new version out every 5 years or so.

    I feel like a lot of GAS is trying stuff out, and I think that's perfectly reasonable to do if you're trying out a different type of photography. You're probably not going to know if you like shooting macro until you buy a macro lens and go do it for a few weeks. You're probably not going to know if you have a passion for landscapes if you've never handled a wide angle lens. You might feel the need a couple of flashes, umbrellas and reflectors if you're going to try your hand at portraiture.

    But if the "trying out" is going from an EM-5 to an EM-1 to a XT-1 to an X-Pro to an A7 to a GH4, I think you probably need to re-evaluate what the heck you're doing.

    These are my late night thoughts on GAS :). And to clarify only the first line was in response to your post fransglans, the rest was me rambling!
     
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  8. fransglans

    fransglans Mu-43 Top Veteran

    993
    Jun 12, 2012
    Sweden
    gus
    It's an interesting discussion. gas-needs-wants-happiness.
    and everyone is different. some is strong in will power and weak in other areas.
    but for me, the thief of happiness and finance is the periods of laziness and too much time in front of computer. as soon as I really use my stuff and find interesting light/subjects the unpatiently hunt for new gear flies like a bird...

    read me right. get the things that continues to get your attention and leave the rest aside. easy to say. hard to do. I've had the fuji x100 last year and sold it. and still that beauty screams back at me; buy me again! this is ridiculous. i sold it for a couple of good reasons but my sensible mind is often under attack of the gas demons :)

    what can a man do?

    add some humour to this please

    Sent from my GT-I9300 using Mu-43 mobile app
     
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  9. DynaSport

    DynaSport Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 5, 2013
    Dan
    I try very hard to limit myself to one lens or camera purchase a year. That makes me think very hard about what I want next, since I know it will be a year before I buy something else. Otherwise I could easily buy, buy, buy, and selling seldom works out good financially for me. I also try very hard to wait until what I want goes on sale or I find a good example used. The result is that I am usually at least one generation of camera behind and I find myself really wanting a new camera, but when it comes down to spending the money I delay the camera purchase another year so I can buy that lens I really want. And a part of me really enjoys thinking about what my next purchase will be as much as I enjoy actually buying the next thing. I know that what I do won't work for most people, but it works for me.

    I also think that since I know I won't be buying lots of new things, it helps me concentrate on learning to use what I have. And even with the limitations I have set on myself, I have cheated a couple of times and I find myself with two M43 bodies and six lenses. And I find I use one body and one lens about 80% of the time.
     
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  10. rbelyell

    rbelyell Mu-43 Veteran

    356
    Sep 15, 2013
    Mountains of NY
    truly less is more in many instances. it took me a few years to get to this place in photography, but there is much to be said in favor of chasing the concept of understanding how to use your tools vs chasing down new tools. on the other hand, a few years of nonstop GAS lead me to a place where i now know what i want, and to understand that no one camera--or even one format--can do everything well. for example, m4/3 excels at telephoto while FF is rather cumbersome in that regard. rangefinders create a unique experience where the photographer can lose themselves in the scene and the process that m4/3 cannot duplicate. etc etc etc. find your balance, choose your tools and be happy.
     
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  11. sprocket87

    sprocket87 Mu-43 Veteran

    306
    Jun 29, 2011
    This is a timely topic for me as well. Anyone who has seen my "E-M5 Woes" thread knows I've been deliberating on my future with M43. Do I stick it out and move to a GX7 or EM1? Or do I move on to greener pastures and try Fuji out? (for the record I bought a used X-E1 and am going to try it with one lens for awhile to see if it captures my fancy).

    I think the point about buying the RIGHT thing up front is definitely true. I've struggled with that because I'm the kind of guy to do SO much research on everything I buy, always trying to find the best value. Which thing gives me the most bang for the buck? M43 offers a lot of bang for the buck, but is it what I really want to use?? I've been realizing over 2+ years of M43 shooting that I just don't care for the smaller sensor "look" as much. Don't get me wrong, I don't want to turn this into M43 vs APS-C or FF battle, but the fact remains that I have, to some extent, been lying to myself about what I really wanted in my photography in order to justify my switch from FF to M43.

    I guess what I'm saying boils down to this: I'm starting to learn that before I run off and obsess over every new camera, system or technology, I should stop and analyze myself first. What do I really like, photographically? What focal length/FOV do I enjoy shooting most? What kind of DOF do I like using and seeing in my images? What kind of weight and ergonomics do I value in my system? Those questions should all come before the technical minutia -- the specifications and megapixel count and IBIS and video quality and even price.

    I am trying to keep in mind the saying "Penny wise, pound foolish". In other words, we can get so consumed with worrying about saving a little bit of money that we end up making a choice that costs us much more in the long run. I am not saying M43 is a bad choice, at least not for everyone, but the point is true for photography and GAS in general. Before we develop the desire and lust for new gear, we should slow down and really think hard about ourselves -- determine what is a want and what is a need, and determine whether our current gear is really leaving us unsatisfied or if we are just chasing a unicorn.

    Finally, one thing I have discovered to help with this process, if you have a robust software catalog like Lightroom, is to go back and review your shot history. See how many shots you took with each camera, or each lens / focal length, or each aperture. Which combinations yielded the most keepers, or your favorite shots? Let the statistics guide you and you will learn almost indisputably what your tastes and preferences are, whether or not you consciously realize it. Plus looking over your back-catalog of shots goes a long way toward cooling GAS. It reminds you that you've taken a lot of shots you're proud of with old gear, and that what you've been using is probably perfectly adequate. Only if you can really identify some concrete disappointment with your shot history that could be improved with new/different gear should you consider looking into a change.
     
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  12. tosvus

    tosvus Mu-43 Top Veteran

    632
    Jan 4, 2014
    I don't think you have your GAS under control if you buy a M240!! :D

    For me, m43 would be perfect if Olympus or Panasonic could come out with one higher resolution camera for landscapes. I am happy with the lenses, and the low light capability is really enough for me. I don't shoot fast sports either.
     
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  13. silver92b

    silver92b Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 7, 2013
    Atlanta, GA
    LOL! I definitely don't have GAS under any kind of control :wink: The topic did come to mind as I was writing my goodbyes to the EM-5. One huge problem I have is peer pressure. I am afraid I've fallen in with the wrong crowd :wink:

    I like the discussion and I read some really thoughtful and insightful contributions. Definitely buying the M240 was not a way to reduce future expenditures or curb GAS. On the contrary, I now will find myself buying more expensive glass after trying to "get more bang for the buck" and trying to bypass the Leica glass at first :tongue:. Also, I know myself just enough that the future is fraught with conflicting decisions and agonizing choices. For instance, I know that I will have to have a longer lens than the 50mm and of course, a wider lens than the 50 as well. I possess the 35mm Zeiss and the 25f4 Snapshot Skopar. Also, the adapted 100mm f2.8 FD does a creditable job. But...... Well, you know where I am going with this:wink:

    Anyway, the M240 and Leica glass is definitely *not* for everybody, and I'm not talking solely about the cost. Basically, the rangefinder experience is completely different and the concept of image capture is not like with the Mirrorless/DSLR. It is more like using film with some very nice advantages. But also, I've captured thousands of images with my various cameras. Although I have a good number of images that really came out well (to my estimation), what always dogs me are the one that did not come out well because the gear was just not suitable for the job. For instance, I like to capture images of people and situations that are often in dim light. The EM-5 with the vaunted PL20f1.7 was a huge disappointment when I tried photographing a party in a club/restaurant. It almost soured me on the MFT system, but instead I blamed it all on the lens... I listened to the people who love MFT and they all sang the praises of the MFT for *any* situation. OF course, you can imagine where this was taking me. I bought and sold numerous lenses trying to find the "right one". Came close, but no cigar...

    I did not want to hear, let alone accept the valid criticism of some pundits because I loved the MFT and wanted it to be the superior system. I had put a deposit on the new Olympus 40-150 f2.8 trying to get a long lens that was fast and sharp. I had already tried a good number of fine lenses including the 100-300, the Zuiko 50-200, several adapted zooms and tele lenses but I could not successfully capture the images I wanted. Fortunately, the 40--150 and the TC 1.4 would never arrive and I tired of the wait and cancelled the whole thing. This is when I learned of the M240 available at a *good price*. I had sworn that I would not succumb to the siren call of the Leica, but I could not resist. So now I have to concentrate on this and not just go chasing after the next Sony or whatever.

    I've learned after allowing my mind to open, that what I wanted to get image wise, was not what the MFT system was ideal for.. Not saying that MFT is not good. Far from it, it's a wonderful system and I love it still. I've kept the EM-1 and the best glass and will probably keep it for quite a while. My first digital rangefinder, the RD-1 is now for sale. I loved shooting with it and it's partially responsible for my escalation to the M240. Even though, I'm not experienced yet with the M240, particularly with manual focusing and having steady hands, I find that I'm getting shots in low light conditions that rival and surpass those taken by professional photographers with FF Canikons and big long lenses :thumbup:

    No, I don't think GAS is under control or it's over. But I do think I might actually be entering a new stage in my passion for photography.

    Cheers.
     
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  14. sprocket87

    sprocket87 Mu-43 Veteran

    306
    Jun 29, 2011
    If nothing else, in my experience, acquiring new gear is a huge motivation to go out and take more pictures. I hate to say anything good about GAS, but the fact is, it has gotten me out of a slump more than once. Ideally that wouldn't be the best (or cheapest) way to get out of a slump though :biggrin:
     
  15. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    Let's face it - new gear can simply be a lot of *fun*. I don't really need anything more than I have right now, but I'd be lying if I didn't say I've pondered purchasing a Sigma DP Merrill and some Fuji X stuff at some point in the past. I've got a little 'lens GAS' left in the form of the O75/1.8, O40-150/2.8 (which I don't really need since I'm not a huge telephoto shooter and I'm more than happy with the 50-200)...
     
  16. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    This is a well-made point.

    To build on it, I'd also like to emphasize the importance of printing. My girlfriend and I just made a bit of a photo album for the year. Late 2013 I bought her a Samsung NX210, and myself a Panasonic GX1. We printed about 120 photos from a variety of different cameras, mostly 4×6s and 8×10s. You could tell when the 8×10s were from a 1/2.3" sensor (and mostly just because of poor P&S noise reduction algorithms), but there was no difference between my 4/3 and my girlfriend’s APS-C, with the GX1 still holding up nicely at ISO 3200. That shot in particularly looked quite grainy (though still effective) on the monitor, but looked brilliant in print with barely a trace of noise discernible.

    On the 4×6 prints, the iPhone shots often looked just as good (and sometimes better, due to the perceptual sharpness of having deeper depth of field) as any of the larger sensor cameras.

    Combing through the photos that I liked and what I liked about them was important, as was getting the perspective. I'm quite certain that some of my favourite images - one in particular, taken with the 7.5/f3.5 fisheye on my lowly 16MP GX1 - would hold up well printing at 18x24" or even larger, based on what was resolved in the 8x10".

    It was very grounding. As much as I like the idea of FF, I am much happier now trying to work with what I have. I may shuffle around and sell a little bit of gear (maybe trading legacy lenses for native ones to save size), but printing goes a long way towards quelling GAS as far as I'm concerned.

    Haha, anyone want a Panasonic 14-42 v1, or an Enna-Munchen Tele-Ennalyt 240mm f4.5? I'll give you a good price...
     
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  17. sprocket87

    sprocket87 Mu-43 Veteran

    306
    Jun 29, 2011
    Enjoyed your whole post, but this sentence makes me think of how far sensors have come anyway. My old D700 was 12.1MP -- huge resolution at the time but barely acceptable resolution today. But I just had a number of huge metal prints done from old D700 shots, one of which was at 30x45", and it is absolutely stunning, even at point blank range. So yeah.
     
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  18. metalmania

    metalmania Mu-43 Veteran

    244
    Jul 19, 2012
    NYC
    I am still using two E-M5s. My best spending ever.
     
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  19. tosvus

    tosvus Mu-43 Top Veteran

    632
    Jan 4, 2014
    Unfortunately, there are those that will claim m43 is great for everything. That is of course not true, and in the end, it comes down to if it is good enough that matters to you. (Or if you can afford/not afford having multiple systems). I may end up getting a second system with higher resolution and low light capability down the line - but luckily for now, I am happy with what I got. Then again, that M240 sounds mighty tempting... ;) In all seriousness, I have always wanted to try the rangefinder experience. You are not helping my GAS! ;)
     
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  20. skellington

    skellington Mu-43 Regular

    172
    Mar 4, 2013
    Atlanta, GA
    Keith
    I'm very guilty of the occasional bout of GAS.

    But I think some of it comes fear of needing to address my weaknesses as a photographer, and learn new things, and be a beginner (oh so painful!).

    I certainly know enough to decide that the $600 lens is better than the $200 lens, and buy the right one. So I'll improve my photography with money, and that means I don't have to address the real issues surrounding my photography.
     
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