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S-OVF White Balance Mystery...

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by alex g, Apr 30, 2016.

  1. alex g

    alex g Mu-43 Top Veteran

    549
    Mar 30, 2016
    New York / Bath
    Well, it's a mystery to me at least! To my eye, the recently introduced simulated OVF feature in the E-M5 mkII does a remarkably good job of matching the white balance of the image displayed in the EVF to the colours of the scene as I perceive them naturally, which of course is how one would expect a real OVF to behave. Naively, I'd have thought that there are many situations in which it would be really useful to be able to apply the S-OVF white balance to the actual exposed image, not just the EVF display. It seems like the perfect default setting - to record the image the way you actually see it at the time.

    Leaving aside the question of whether or not the 'correct' white balance is that which renders a perfectly white object white, I'd say that given a choice between this magical, mysterious 'S-OVF' auto white balance and the conventional 'average colour = grey' auto white balance, many people would opt for the first one.

    I wondered for a moment whether perhaps the S-OVF white balance might be simply 'auto' + 'keep warm colours', but having checked, it doesn't look that way.

    Perhaps I've simply overlooked a setting which does precisely what I've just described?
    Any thoughts? :)
     
  2. hazwing

    hazwing Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 25, 2012
    Australia
    not sure how many people use the s-ovf feature. I didn't see much benefit in it, so I've never tried.
     
  3. alex g

    alex g Mu-43 Top Veteran

    549
    Mar 30, 2016
    New York / Bath
    Neither did I to be honest, until I noticed the white-balance behaviour in the finder. I'd like to be able to apply that white balance to the recorded image, while using the regular EVF as per usual. :)
     
  4. Ross the fiddler

    Ross the fiddler Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I think it is just the saturation & exposure compensation. Cut back both & then have a look. I tried one with the saturation at -2 & Exp Comp at -1.0 for the scene I was looking at indoors.
     
  5. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I also agree that it's mostly tone and saturation differences. The S-OVF simply gives a high dynamic range flat look.

    Since I shoot exclusively in RAW I set my tone curve to -5 highlight and +3 shadow, this gives me more visibility of what I can work with when PP RAW.

    When S-OVF was introduced I tried it but found it looked practically the same as those settings anyway. It seemed pointless given that it only works for the EVF, at least with custom settings it applies to both.
     
  6. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Actually that's pretty much spot on, especially if you fix the WB to daylight.

    I've also noticed a subtle WB difference between my EVF and LCD that required some tweaking...
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  7. Ross the fiddler

    Ross the fiddler Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I tried it under Warm LED lighting to come to my conclusion, but that wasn't conclusive without trying other lighting. :rolleyes:
     
  8. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I tried it with 3000K LED, 2700K CFL and 4000K CFL. I think S-OVF may also activate 120 FPS EVF refresh, the refresh is much smoother (just like with High FPS enabled).
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  9. alex g

    alex g Mu-43 Top Veteran

    549
    Mar 30, 2016
    New York / Bath
    Let me make sure I'm on the same page as you guys... are you saying that S-OVF looks similar to reducing saturation in shooting menu1/Picture Mode/Natural and subtracting a stop of exposure compensation, and setting the camera's WB to Daylight (sunny)?
     
  10. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Pretty much, at least with artificial lighting. I've also got custom curves set as outlined above, which may make it more like -0.7 EV compensation. You probably don't want to actually use exposure compensation though, that will mess up your exposure.
     
  11. alex g

    alex g Mu-43 Top Veteran

    549
    Mar 30, 2016
    New York / Bath
    Ah, okay, yes I can see the similarity for artificial lighting. Doesn't seem to apply to natural lighting though. It seems to be some sort of dynamic effect, rather than a fixed function. But I may be wrong, of course!
     
  12. Ross the fiddler

    Ross the fiddler Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    That's how it looks to me (under Warm LED lighting).