Remote flash triggers for Olympus

Joined
Feb 28, 2019
Messages
98
Location
Inverness, Scotland
I have Yongnuo remote flash triggers I bought for my Canon. I have tried it a couple of times on Olympus and it works OK. However, I have heard that this could damage the camera so am very wary now.

Anybody use Yongnou or similar and if so, which model?

Thanks
 

PakkyT

Mu-43 Hall of Famer
Joined
Jun 20, 2015
Messages
3,517
Location
New England
However, I have heard that this could damage the camera so am very wary now.
Damage it how? I doubt it very much since likely the trigger does nothing more with the camera than sensing when the hotshoe contacts close and then the rest is done all in the trigger to transmit to the flash, not involving the camera at all.
 

Mikehit

Mu-43 Veteran
Joined
Jan 26, 2018
Messages
371
There used to be concerns about using flash (not trigger) between marques and generations of kit, because a voltage disparity involved in firing the (relatively) powerful flash bulb could fry the camera electronics. However with modern kit a flash doing that is less likely (as long as you are using a modern flash on a modern camera).
Maybe this has led to a misunderstanding between flash and trigger and, as PakkyT says the trigger is simply giving the flash the information on when to fire.
 

junkyardsparkle

haunted scrap heap
Joined
Nov 17, 2016
Messages
2,476
Location
Brennschluss
I'm assuming the OP is concerned about the interactions with the non-Olympus "extra" communication contacts, not flash voltage... not unreasonable considering the Canon pins do line up with the Oly contacts. Some triggers have a "single pin" mode for just this purpose, but I don't know about that one.
 

SpecFoto

Mu-43 Top Veteran
Joined
Aug 28, 2012
Messages
689
Location
So Cal Desert
Real Name
Jim
I used both the Godox X1T-O and more recent XPro-O, which I like a lot better due to the larger and angled screen, on my EM1's and G9 with great success with my Godox flash. My Godox flash include the original AD360's, AD200's, which have basically replaced the AD360's, the V850 and V860II. The AD200 is a very versatile flash with both a strobe and bare bulb flash heads, and a self contained battery that lasts all day, but at about 3x the power of the V850/860 and nearly the same size.

The AD200 is what I use 90% of the time now, including for my outside portraits, though in the last year my portrait shooting has been mainly with my Sony gear. The nice thing about Godox is I just bought another XPro-S for Sony transmitter and all my flash still work. In fact both camera systems can work at the same time with each transmitter controlling the lights set to the specifics of the camera, as the AD200's have internal receivers that work with all camera systems. I had a 2nd shooter use his pany body on a recent shoot with my Oly transmitter and my light setup and we never stepped on each other or suffered any delays, pretty amazing!
 
Last edited:

Mack

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Jan 14, 2018
Messages
1,353
I just bought a second Adorama Flashpoint Explor 600 TTL Pro today (Same flash as the Godox AD-600 TTL Pro) as Adorama is having a sale on them and got it for $749 (List is $899). Adorama supplied a nice fitted case for the last one I bought and I think their warrannty may be better with their house brand since Godox has no USA repair center. I just need more power for the desert sun and to get a lot more DOF on the birds. Going up to very high shutter speeds (1/2500+) using HSS does eat up the flash output power - so more is better for me.

I have both the flat X1T-O and the XPro-O both and the Nikon ones too. I think they recently came out with a third XPro unit as well. The slanted ones are nice as one button can be assigned to control each flash, where the flat one is slower as you need to press the right button and rotate a dial to access each strobe.

However, I use the flat one more as it also has a hot shoe on top of it which holds my Olympus Dot EE LED sight for aiming on the birds. Easier to do it that way than losing them in the EVF. For studio work, the slanted one works better.
 

Hannety

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Aug 15, 2019
Messages
139
need more power for the desert sun and to get a lot more DOF on the birds. Going up to very high shutter speeds (1/2500+) using HSS does eat up the flash output power - so more is better for me.
Using high shutter speeds with HSS to freeze motion is usually a waste unless you are forced to by a significant amount of ambient light.

In high speed mode the AD600 Pro t0.1 time is 1/2360th at 1/8th power. That is 3 stops down on a full power pop. A full power HSS pop at 1/2500th shutter will be about 4.5 stops down.

Using high shutter speed and HSS instead of flash duration to freeze motion will leave you with about 1.5 stops less light, much more flash heating, battery use, and recycle time.

For the OP: If the Yongnuo trigger you have is dedicated for Canon then the extra hot shoe pins are not compatible. The incompatibility may not cause any damage but I wouldn't risk it. Godox triggers are only going to work with Godox flashes or receivers. Presumably you have Yongnuo or Canon flash(es) you want to use?
 

Mack

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Jan 14, 2018
Messages
1,353
Using high shutter speeds with HSS to freeze motion is usually a waste unless you are forced to by a significant amount of ambient light.

In high speed mode the AD600 Pro t0.1 time is 1/2360th at 1/8th power. That is 3 stops down on a full power pop. A full power HSS pop at 1/2500th shutter will be about 4.5 stops down.

Using high shutter speed and HSS instead of flash duration to freeze motion will leave you with about 1.5 stops less light, much more flash heating, battery use, and recycle time.

.....
I own one of those Sekonic L-858 meters that takes care of HSS flash, but it is sort of a PITA to deal with and I don't always agree with its readings. Wish Sekonic would make the Godox radio for it so the shutter speed set into the meter will cause the correct output power rather than setting it on camera and then firing camera to get the reading with the meter at subject position. I can also set any t.x time I want into it, but it takes too long for me to figure it out on set. For normal non-HSS flash it's great,, but until they get a Godox radio for it it's sort of a run back and forth pain to use.

I resorted going back to the old Guide Number settings for the AD-600 using HSS and mentally calculating them which is faster.

This is what I came up with for the AD-600 full power at ISO 200 in feet with the stock 5" reflector:
1/250 GN=130
1/500 GN=70
1/1000 GN=50
1/2000 GN=35
1/4000 GN=28
1/8000 GN=18

For fun, I just checked my Godox TT-685-O at 1/250 and 1/8000 (HSS) and got these GNs:
1/250 GN=80
1/8000 GN=8

From those GN numbers above, I can open up a stop, or close down using with a focused or long throw reflector, once I get the GN/Distance=f/stop or GN/f/stop=Distance figured out.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 27, 2020
Messages
53
Location
Detroit, Michigan
I use Adorama FlashPoint items, like their Li-Ion flashes and strobes. They are just Godox rebadged, so they all work together. Very nice products, good quality and perform well. I had Yongnuo and switched at the time because I could get better control and more options with the FlashPoints/Godox's... Yongnuo's are less expensive and work pretty good however.

I also have an Olympus flash, the FL-600R which is a great unit and not near as big as the Yongnuo's or FlashPoint Li-Ons. I use the Olympus one on camera sometimes when I want to be a bit "smaller", and can use it off-camera optically when I put the tiny FL-LM3 that comes withe E-M1 line. Works really well. More expensive using Olympus, but they work very well and are solid units. If you don't need strobes then using Oly flashes is a good way to go.
 

Hannety

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Aug 15, 2019
Messages
139
This is what I came up with for the AD-600 full power at ISO 200 in feet with the stock 5" reflector:
1/250 GN=130
1/500 GN=70
1/1000 GN=50
1/2000 GN=35
1/4000 GN=28
1/8000 GN=18
Halving shutter speed will increase the guide number by sqrt(2) so your figures for 1/4000 and 1/250 are wrong. That said it has nothing to do with what I said in my previous post.
 

Mack

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Jan 14, 2018
Messages
1,353
Halving shutter speed will increase the guide number by sqrt(2) so your figures for 1/4000 and 1/250 are wrong. That said it has nothing to do with what I said in my previous post.
My test was actually shooting a ColorChecker Passport at 10 feet. All exposures using the GN's listed print to the same density and RGB value as read in Workspace. Math and how the electronics play out do not always agree, and same goes for the L-858 meter in HSS too. What info the camera is sending to the flash, and what it does with that info, is the unknown as to the duration and likely messing with theory.

It may be the curve of the flash spike and the shorter or longer leg from the AD-600 which may change with a given shutter speed. Maybe the color control part too. All I know is HSS is fickle with regards to shutter speed. So far, Sekonic hasn't been able to come up with a radio trigger plug-in for the L858 meter for some reason. Been a year now waiting for it.

I don't even want to think about dialing the flash power down as that will no doubt change everything with the output curve and spike. Best one can do is shoot a test and see what becomes of it as HSS really is pot luck. Once done, generate a GN for that exact setting and write it down.

Later, I had a look at the waveform as shown in the Sekonic L-858D meter. With a normal 1/250 sec. flash one gets a normal looking hump's worth of light. Once you change it to a faster speed, the hump is replaced by a spike and then a sawtooth series of spikes that slopes downward and continues until the end of the flash. It changes for each speed too where the waveforma at 1/1000 is much different than the one for 1/8000 sec. No wonder Sekonic could not use a normal meter with a HSS flash as the output is very odd under the t0.5 line and Sekonic says in their manual "you cannot calculate the exposure based on the appearance of the waveform." I'm also wondering if the control of the spikey-looking portion of the HSS flash is made by the type of Godox tranmistter, say the XR1 verses the XPro, etc. or is a product of the flash itself (i.e. Is it sending a "Multi" fire signal to the flash unit as one can do by setting that into the transmitter?)

I also did another test of the GN's for a long throw reflector here: https://www.mu-43.com/threads/being-a-cheapskate-and-modding-a-reflector.107798/post-1366393 I gained about 2/3-1 stop more light than the stock 5" reflector. You can see the exposure for the given GN in the Workspace window at the bottom. HSS is weird, but seems once you know the GN at a certain speed it is usable.
 
Last edited:

Hannety

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Aug 15, 2019
Messages
139
My test was actually shooting a ColorChecker Passport at 10 feet.
Still nothing to do with what I said in my first post so I will try saying it with pictures.

I drew 4 straight lines on an adhesive paper label and stuck it on the front of a computer fan spinning at some unknown speed. Camera on a tripod and I lit the fan with a V860II.

Flash set full power, HSS, camera at 1/4000th produced this:
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

Straight lines bent from motion and shutter roll, significant motion blur.

I then turned off HSS which forced the camera to 1/250th and I set the flash power to 1/64th which produced this:
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

About 1/3 stop darker, no distortion, barely noticeable motion blur.

I then set the flash to 1/8 power and the camera to f22 from f8 producing this:
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

Same brightness, no distortion, noticeable motion blur, but, significantly less than HSS at 1/4000th.

HSS and high shutter speed used 8 times more flash power to give 8 times less light and significantly worse motion blur.

HSS is rubbish at freezing motion. If you are forced to use high shutter speeds because of significant ambient light you are likely better off using your 2-3 stops of extra non-HSS flash light to overcome 2-3 stops of ND filter cutting down ambient light.
 

Mack

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Jan 14, 2018
Messages
1,353
Thanks for the info and photos, but I think we are on different pages.

I get your explanation for the flash burst as a means of speed control and freezing a subject. However, I am using HSS for daylight fill in bright sun and your mentioning of the square root doesn't work for changing among the higher camera speeds using HSS as the flash output waveform is altered to an odd decaying sawtooth shape. I'm not including ND filters here either which is another option which I also use, just raw flash output and how it differs in HSS mode with a camera speed change

I can use the brief burst of the flash by adjusting its power to freeze objects using slower speeds. I can do that with the L-858D as it shows the speed pulse of the flash. I think the fastest burst I've gotten was ~1/55,000 sec. But that's not going to work for sunlight fill along with a faster than allowed flash sync speed and no ND, unless I am inches away from the subject. That marked difference from the manufacturer's GN was disturbing when I first used HSS and had to be a couple of feet from the subject rather than 12 feet or more in studio.

The GN first mentioned with the 5" reflector pretty much agrees with the long throw reflector in the link earlier, other than a slight output gain with the focused one. The square root rule doesn't work in HSS with a speed change.

I'm not saying one is better than the other, just the HSS doesn't follow the square root rule by changing shutter speeds. Actually, I'd guess if one really looks at the overall image frame made off a HSS image with the flash's sawtooth waveform, one might pick out some slight density "flash spike" variations across it too.

Aside, if I want a longer flash burst without the sawtooth effect of HSS and keep waterfalls smooth and not "Salt and pepper" looking in their spray, I can resort to using one of these ($75 each) bulbs that burn for about 2 seconds each. I have a computer that syncs them with the Nikon and they do follow the "Square Root" law, albeit a low GN of maybe 30. Actually, the color seems a lot better from images made off them verses electronic flash too - just $75 a pop makes one think long prior to hitting the shutter button. This: Meggaflash PF-300 flash bulb

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 

hoggdoc

Mu-43 Veteran
Joined
May 19, 2010
Messages
222
Location
Longview, Washington USA
Real Name
Wayne
I have Yongnuo remote flash triggers I bought for my Canon. I have tried it a couple of times on Olympus and it works OK. However, I have heard that this could damage the camera so am very wary now.

Anybody use Yongnou or similar and if so, which model?

Thanks
I assume these are straight triggers with no means to make adjustments to the flashes remotely. If that is the case, if the tigger signals the remote flashes to fire, I would say all is well. All these triggers look for from the camera is a switched signal to tell them to fire the RF signal to the remote receiver which in turn tells the flash to fire.

I can see no reason if all this works as normal that there is any reason to believe there will be damage to the camera body. Perhaps a call to the camera mfg tech support line would make you feel better.
 

Mack

Mu-43 All-Pro
Joined
Jan 14, 2018
Messages
1,353
Just saw the new Godox radio trigger video for the Sekonic L-858 meter. Adorama shows it as a pre-order for $149 for the L-858 meter.


Aside, video must be recent as I see the assistant is wearing a mask and the photographer is wearing a mask and a faceshield both.
 

Latest posts

Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Mu-43 is a fan site and not associated with Olympus, Panasonic, or other manufacturers mentioned on this site.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Copyright © 2009-2019 Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom