Rectilinear Ultra Wide Angle, prime or zoom, adapted?

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by barry13, Apr 29, 2014.

  1. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Hi,

    I need a UWA, Rectilinear (non-fisheye) lens in 7mm or 8mm, f4 or better, for occasional real estate photography (need UWA for bedrooms and bathrooms).

    I already tried 9mm, and it's not wide enough.

    I don't want to pay $1000 for the Pana 7-14mm.

    I do have the Oly 8mm 4/3 fisheye, but I'm hesitant to rely on it as my only wide lens as it's hard to tell when shooting what will be cropped out when de-fishing.

    I also have the Oly 4/3 7-14mm f4, but I'm thinking of selling it due to it being too front-heavy/unbalanced on the E-M1 (and I don't think an extra grip would help much).

    So, I'm wondering what else is out there...

    Any Rectilinear / non-fisheye UWA 7-8mm lenses out there, under $500?

    Thanks!
    Barry
     
  2. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Hmm... I just found the Sigma 8-16mm F4.5-5.6 DC HSM online, in these mounts:
    Sigma
    Nikon
    Canon
    Sony/Minolta
    Pentax

    $699 retail, cheaper on eBay.

    If adapted, would it work in MF mode; i.e. is it real MF, or is it focus-by-wire?

    It's still pretty long and heavy; a 7mm or 8mm prime would be better, if there is one.

    I saw mention of some Computar 'B' 8mm lenses, which have less vignetting than a normal C-mount lens, but I can't find one for sale anywhere.
    Also, I'm not sure how big they are.

    Thanks,
    Barry
     
  3. duke

    duke Mu-43 Veteran

    420
    Dec 4, 2010
    Tulsa, moving to Houston
    Duke
    Short answer, nope. Olympus is supposed to come out with a new 7-14 sometime next year or you could look around and try to find a panasonic 7-14 used in the $750 range. Any adapted UWA lenses are going to be just as big as your 4/3 version so I don't see a point in going that direction either. Have you thought of selling your 4/3 version for the panasonic?
     
  4. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    Well, if quality (off-center sharpness) isn't a huge concern, you could get a focal-reducer and adapt one of the APS-C ultrawides. Anything 11mm or wider with the Zhongyi 0.72x focal reducer (~$120) will translate into 8mm or wider. Offhand, I guess the Sigma 10-20/4-5.6 and the Tamron 10-24/3.5-4.5 would fit the bill (<$400). Both will be manual focus only, and use stop-down metering.

    All in all though, it's probably simpler to just buy a cheap secondhand APS-C camera and one of those two lenses, if you absolutely must have something in that range.
     
  5. nstelemark

    nstelemark Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 28, 2013
    Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada
    Larry
    Well you could go with a SpeedBooster and some sort of adapted prime. 8mm would be 11mm or so native (taking into account the reverse crop from the speedbooster).

    But Darla is right a cheap APS C body would be a better choice.
     
  6. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Thanks...

    So would the Sigma 8-16mm work?

    I guess adjusting the aperture is difficult with the APS-C lenses?
    What about focus?


    I've seen the Pana for $800 on eBay, but it looks like it needs a filter added to avoid purple artifacts, which is another $50.
    The size and weight are attractive, but I don't really like the price.

    I only do real estate shoots a couple times a year, if even that, and I don't get paid for them (they're for a relative who's a realtor) so it's hard to justify spending so much.

    I haven't used my 7-14mm for anything else other than real estate, although that's partly because it's so heavy.
    There's an air show this weekend, with a lot of historic planes; I was planning to take the 7-14mm, but as the E-M1 is so unbalanced with the adapter and lens, and my bag is already heavy, I decided to leave it and just take the fisheye and a couple of 'kit' lenses.

    If I had a 300 gram 7-14mm, I would certainly use it more often, but for the price, I'd rather get the 12-40mm Pro and the 40-150mm Pro first, as I'd use them more.

    The Olympus 7-14mm mu-43 is apparently going to be larger (maybe 10.9cm; see https://www.mu-43.com/showthread.php?t=63683&page=3&p=635459#post635459), and I suspect it will be around $1200-1500 (based on the price of the 4/3 lens, and the fact this one will be f2.8). I also worry it will be heavy, although some are claiming 300grams (same as Pana, which seems unlikely for an f2.8 weather-sealed lens).
    And it's supposedly not coming out for 1.5 more years.

    I guess I will take some practice pics with the fisheye and de-fish them and see if I can get consistent results without losing important parts of the shot (hard to know when shooting what will happen in de-fish).

    Thanks,
    Barry
     
  7. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    Yes, it will work. For aperture, you need to get an adapter with an aperture ring and a lens with a mechanically controlled aperture. For example, a Nikon G adapter and Nikon-mount Sigma 8-16. Focus is fully manual (not by wire).

    Note that the Sigma 8-16 doesn't have a thread for screw-in filters.
     
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  8. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    Wow! I find my ED 7-14mm to be perfectly balanced on my E-M1, as are all of my 4/3 lenses, as they give me an excellent grip and stability. I have the RRS grip on the E-M1 to give me more purchase on the body and I couldn't ask for more. You are getting rid of one of the best ultra-wide angle zooms ever made. I would persevere a little longer before making such a dramatic decision.
     
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  9. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    I was looking at the RRS BOEM1 plate online; is that the one you got? (http://www.reallyrightstuff.com/s.nl/sc.26/category.3348/.f)

    Do you end up putting your right thumb on the back side edge of the plate to help counter the balance problem?
    I can't see how the front lip would really help.

    FWIW, the camera and lens are fine if I hold it with 2 hands, but that's not always possible.

    I'm hesitant to buy the Pana because of the purple flare issues and the price (for that price it shouldn't have such severe problems!), and it has more CA than the 4/3 Oly.

    I may eventually get the new Oly 7-14mm mu-43; I'm hoping it's as good or better than the 4/3 one.
    I was thinking of selling the 4/3 7-14mm soon before it loses all its value, but I'll probably hang on to it for now.

    Thanks,
    Barry
     
  10. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    Yes, I have the BOEM1; I never wanted to own another factory grip, just something that increased the height of the body a tad. Before the RRS grip, two of my fingers would go under the body, which was extremely awkward, but now only the pinky will rest just under/on the edge of the grip. This is much more comfortable. My thumb always rests near the rear control wheel. In an emergency, I can hold the camera quite steady just with my right hand; the weight of the lens provides natural vibration damping and stability. My main lens is the 14-35mm f2, which is a fair bit larger than the 7-14mm and holding it is not an issue.

    I think if you practise with the 7-14mm, you'll work out a good way to hold it and be comfortable with it in all situations. If doing real estate (something I did many years ago), think about taking along a small step ladder or the like, which will enable you to get a higher perspective and allow you to hold the camera with both hands. I used to have two ladders, a short one and a taller one, which were invaluable for some situations where you needed to cover a large room. And this was in the film days when I had to use a much narrower FL lens; oh to have my current setup in those days. As I said, you'll be hard pressed to find a better lens.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. Nate Crisman

    Nate Crisman Mu-43 Rookie

    23
    May 23, 2012
    I bought the 7-14 pany lens specifically to shoot my house for sale, just about every shot was at 7mm (the Oly 9-18 wouldn't have worked it as well)

    I don't think the size or weight of the lens is at all obtrusive, so while a/f and aperture aren't all the helpful for real estate use, they make the lens a better "everyday use" or travel lens vs a fully manual adapted lens.

    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
     

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