Recommended trip for 'Indian Summer'?

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by Starred, Aug 9, 2012.

  1. Starred

    Starred Mu-43 Regular

    Aug 7, 2010
    Because she always wanted to experience the Indian Summer, I would like to give my wife a fly/drive trip (about 8-9 days) to the Eastcoast of the USA in October as a birthday present.

    What cities/places would you recommend to include in the trip to not only experience Indian Summer, but also to have great photo opportunities?
  2. RevBob

    RevBob Super Moderator

    Jun 4, 2011
    NorthWestern PA
    Real Name:
    Pretty much anywhere in Vermont or New Hampshire. The area around Montpelier and Waturbury, VT is especially nice. You might even spot moose! Close enough that you can also catch Boston and the Cape if you want.
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  3. newbert

    newbert Mu-43 Veteran

    Jul 22, 2012
    Glens Falls, NY
    A lot depends on what you like, and what you mean by "Indian Summer". -
    Cities? -- New York, Boston and Washington DC immediately come to mind.
    Fall Foliage? - Early October: Anywhere in New England, but especially Vermont and Maine. Late October: West Virginia and Western North Carolina.

    If, by Indian Summer, you mean extended summer/warmer weather, the farther south you go the longer summer weather is extended.

    It might help if you let us know where you're travelling from and what interests you to help narrow down the choices. After all "East Coast of the USA" covers a lot of area! :smile:
  4. Starred

    Starred Mu-43 Regular

    Aug 7, 2010
    It's mainly about Fall Foliage. My wife really likes the intense colors :smile:
  5. MrPhotoBob

    MrPhotoBob Mu-43 Veteran

    Jun 16, 2012
    I always visit the Great Smokey Mountains during the fall. I really enjoy using my camera photographing the area, and now that I have a small light weight E-M5 I will enjoy it even more. :)
  6. Pennington

    Pennington Mu-43 Regular

    Colors depend on a lot of factors and, sadly, aren't a given. There has to be enough water for the trees, plus the right combination of temperatures during autumn. There's a bunch of foliage tracking websites that will help, but to some extent you have to accept that you're rolling the dice and hoping for the best :smile:

    Not to be discouraging, just realistic - some autumns have great foliage, others have been flops.

    Having grown up in Vermont, I can say that there are plenty of lovely areas. Especially if you avoid the main roads and take backways and dirt roads (of which there are plenty). The Killington area can be lovely, and they run a gondola to the top of the mountain where, after a short easy hike to the summit, there are amazing views on clear days. The Middlebury area is also popular.

    And while I've never been to Mt. Philo State Park during autumn, given the views during the summer, I can only imagine how lovely it would be: Link to a panorama I shot there.
  7. Hikari

    Hikari Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 26, 2010
    White Mountain National Forest
    Rangeley, ME
    Acadia National Park
    Monadnock region in NH
    Grafton Notch State Park, ME
    Evans Notch, ME
    Camden State Park, ME
  8. dbrantley13

    dbrantley13 Mu-43 Regular

    May 17, 2012
    Highly recommend the White Mountains. If you're driving there's a beautiful loop that circles the mountains that could be done in a day or a week depending on your desire.

    I also live in the Monadnock Region in NH and can testify that it does indeed look beautiful, but you have to time it right. By mid-October the best sights actually have already come and passed as the bright reds tend to die first. Also, there isn't an enormous amount of "things to do" in the Monadnock region, more getting in touch with nature than anything else. PM me if you end up going this route and I'll try and give you some advice.
  9. Starred

    Starred Mu-43 Regular

    Aug 7, 2010
    My travel agent suggested the following:

    Day 1: Flight Amsterdam - Boston. Hotel in Quincy
    Day 2: Visit Boston, Freedom Trail, whale watching
    Day 3: Car to Salem, Gloucester, Rockport, York Beach, Kennebunkport. Hotel in South Portland
    Day 4: New Hampshire (North Conway), white mountains. Hotel in Jackson
    Day 5: Visit Mount Washington. Kancamagus Highway to Vermont. Hotel in Vergennes
    Day 6: Route 100 through Green Mountains. Stockbridge in Berkshires, visit Norman Rockwell Museum. Hotel in Mystic.
    Day 7: Visit Seaport Museum in Mystic. Via Connecticut and Rhode Island to Newport. Hotel in Newport
    Day 8: Back to Boston via Plymouth. Visit Plimoth Plantation. Flight Boston - Amsterdam
    Day 9: Back in Amsterdam

    What do you think?
  10. newbert

    newbert Mu-43 Veteran

    Jul 22, 2012
    Glens Falls, NY
    Although I live in NY State, I'm quite familiar with New England and relative distances between locations. Based on my experience, that sounds to me like an awful lot of ground to cover in 9 days!

    On Day 5 in particular, there's no reason to overnight in Vergennes, VT (not the most scenic of towns - not much of anything to see there). Vergennes is on the west side of Vermont while you'll be travelling from the east (NH) then partially retracing your steps back into the mountains of Central Vermont on Day 6. I'd recommend staying in the Woodstock, VT area instead on Night 5 and then proceeding on to Route 100. Woodstock is a very scenic "artsy" town with lots of shops and restaurants.

    Day 6 sounds like an awfully long day with lots of driving. You'll probably want to make numerous stops along Route 100 in Vermont and also in the Berkshires. To then drive all the way to the coast (Mystic, CT) might be a bit much.

    While everything you plan to visit is worthwhile, I'd recommend scaling back the number of places a bit. Otherwise you may end up having memories mainly of driving the car.

    Just my thoughts.
  11. Starred

    Starred Mu-43 Regular

    Aug 7, 2010
    Thanks Bert. As I don't know anything about this specific area of the US (I live in Holland, nearby Amsterdam), your comments, and those of the others of course, are very valuable!