Recommend a waterproof bag for my E-M5?

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by jlouisalmeida, Dec 18, 2014.

  1. jlouisalmeida

    jlouisalmeida Mu-43 Regular

    55
    Jul 7, 2014
    Hello all!

    Going on a cruise soon and there will be several opportunities for some underwater photography (snorkeling, not scuba) and was wondering if anyone has any experience with a waterproof bag/case? The true waterproof cases are a out of my price range...

    I will probably only be using the kit lens, as my others are manual focus or zoom, unless you think the 40-150 could fit?

    Thanks!
    J

    Gear: OMD E-M5, 14-42 kit, Oly 40-150, Rokinon 12mm, OM 50
     
  2. Evan614

    Evan614 Mu-43 Regular

    109
    May 6, 2014
    BuckeyeState
    I had a dicapac. It worked ok. sometimes tough to control camera.
    bag's life span is limited to a couple years. If you get one I suggest selling after usage.
    I suggest you get a filter for color correcting.
     
  3. Holoholo55

    Holoholo55 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 13, 2014
    Honolulu, HI
    Walter
    J,

    Back in the days when I had a Canon 35mm SLR, I used an Ewa Marine housing (a flexible bag with an optical glass port) to cover my camera and protect it when I took it out on small fishing boats for scientific fieldwork. It worked well enough to keep the camera dry, but I never took it diving. The company is still around. http://www.ewa-marine.com

    A wide angle lens would probably work better than a normal lens. I'm not an underwater photographer, but I'm sure there are many on this site that could pitch in.
     
  4. flamingfish

    flamingfish Mu-43 Top Veteran

    771
    Nov 16, 2012
    Emily
    Honestly, I'd get an inexpensive waterproof P&S instead, rather than risking my E-M5. In fact, that's exactly what I've done -- I have a trip planned for next summer when I'll be snorkeling, and I jumped on a refurb TG-850 when the Olympus outlet had a deal on it. I've flooded a camera while diving, and it isn't pretty.

    How good a snorkeler are you? Are you going to be mostly floating on the surface looking down, or will you dive down to get a closer look at things? I ask because shooting straight down isn't going to give you great photos. It flattens the scene out. If you're going to be doing that, I don't think risking your expensive camera would be worth it. If you can dive down to get a good angle and hold yourself still while taking the photo (which is more difficult than it sounds), there might be more point to using your E-M5.

    If you're snorkeling from a boat, or any location that requires a jump into the water, jump in first and have someone hand your camera to you. Do not jump in while holding your camera. (I also flooded a camera that way, in my early days.)

    I agree that a wider angle is probably better for the sort of underwater photos you'll be taking.
     
  5. Holoholo55

    Holoholo55 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 13, 2014
    Honolulu, HI
    Walter
    That's great advice. Less risk, and easier to handle one of those than an EM5 in a case or bag.
     
  6. jlouisalmeida

    jlouisalmeida Mu-43 Regular

    55
    Jul 7, 2014
    I am a strong swimmer and enjoy diving down and grabbing on to rocks or anything to hold me under so I can observe the wildlife, so that is why I wanted to be able to take my better camera down. Thank you for the tip though
     
  7. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Watch out for Moray eels; they hide in rocks and have big teeth.

    Barry
     
  8. letsgofishing

    letsgofishing Mu-43 Veteran

    352
    Nov 21, 2012
    South Africa
    Mike Kaplan
    Years ago I bought a Dicapac for my LX3 for a trip to Belize. Scuba'd on reefs up to 15m and it worked just fine.
     
  9. flamingfish

    flamingfish Mu-43 Top Veteran

    771
    Nov 16, 2012
    Emily
    Grabbing rocks is fine, but be sure it's a rock, not coral. Grabbing coral is not fine! Just touching coral can kill the polyps, and most coral regrows very slowly. If you need to steady yourself, plant a hand on the sand, or find a dead spot (white, bare) on the coral and steady yourself with one finger. (Sorry for the rant, but my inner eco-diver winces at the idea of touching anything on a reef but the sand.)
     
  10. jlouisalmeida

    jlouisalmeida Mu-43 Regular

    55
    Jul 7, 2014
    Don't worry! I consider myself a very environmentally friendly person, the only thing I really ended up grabbing was a cinderblock that was on the bottom and had nothing growing on it.

    I did end up with the Dicapac, it is a bit cumbersome but once you get the hang of it its great! I didn't dive with it but rather used it to shoot some underwater video for our standing dolphin encounter
     
  11. owczi

    owczi nareteV 34-uM

    :2thumbs: (joke)

    Plastic-Slider-Zip-Lock-Bags.