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RAW processing apps for ipad

Discussion in 'Image Processing' started by runner girl, Jul 7, 2013.

  1. runner girl

    runner girl Mu-43 Regular

    192
    Nov 26, 2011
    I will be taking a three week vacation and won't be taking a computer - just my iPad. I am looking at the iPad apps piRAWnha and PhotoRaw. Does anyone have any experience with either or both?
     
  2. swampduck

    swampduck Mu-43 Veteran

    334
    Mar 29, 2013
    Taneytown , MD
    Dan
    Snapseed is what I am using. I have the camera kit and it imports raw files. I can then see them and process as needed.
     
  3. slothead

    slothead Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 14, 2012
    Frederick, MD
    I agree with Dan RunnerGirl. Snapseed is a pretty good app. It has its issues, but overall it is a pretty valuable app for me. I have no experience with the two you mentioned.
     
  4. mtipton1064

    mtipton1064 Mu-43 Regular

    34
    Jun 1, 2013
    The two raw processing apps you mention are very slow! I use Photogene, Snapseed, and Retouch. I take all of my pictures in raw+jpg. On the iPad you will be post processing the jpg. At home you will have the raw.
     
  5. robbie36

    robbie36 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 25, 2010
    Bangkok
    rob collins
    I am probably making the same point a mtipton1064. Snapseed does not process 'raw' files. If you import raw files to your ipad, snapseed will process the embedded jpeg within the raw file. So essentially 'snapseed' can handle 'raw' files - it cant actually edit them.
     
  6. slothead

    slothead Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 14, 2012
    Frederick, MD
    You make a good point Robbie. In fact you can never see raw files as an image. To see the image the file has to be "interpreted" into an image. My guess is that you always see the JPG (or some image file). Obviously raw data is not an image (it's a string of 1s and 0s that bear no resemblance to what your eyes see). But you are still correct in that Snapseed is not editing the raw fle.
     
  7. robbie36

    robbie36 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 25, 2010
    Bangkok
    rob collins
    Still in most respects it seems a bit daft to import a RAW file simply to edit a small 1.2mb jpeg. However, (I guess this is still the case) the camera connection kit doesnt let you import just jpegs from a RAW+jpeg shoot. You can however import jpegs from raw+jpeg via a wifi card.

    Photoraw and pirawnha are genuine raw editors with their own built in demosaicing engine. I havent tried them but the reviews say 1) they are very slow (not surprising given the size of the file) 2) very limited in editing features and 3) pretty klunky to use.
     
  8. mtipton1064

    mtipton1064 Mu-43 Regular

    34
    Jun 1, 2013
    That was my reaction when I tried them out.
     
  9. jolieteddie

    jolieteddie Mu-43 Rookie

    19
    Jul 9, 2012
    PhotoRaw

    I've used PhotoRaw on my iPad. It's okay. Supposedly it actually works with the raw file. At least it seems to. I do some editing on the iPad, but mostly use it to back up my files while traveling and some quick reviewing of images as I go along. I ALWAYS keep the files on the memory card, only copying the files to the iPad. Got the 64GB mini and so there is ample room for a couple days shooting.
     
  10. bassman

    bassman Mu-43 Top Veteran

    678
    Apr 22, 2013
    New Jersey
    Scott
    Photogene and Filterstorm. I used both of them extensively last year while traveling thru the national parks for a month and posting to a daily blog for friends and family ( Going Away ).
     
  11. Jesse_S

    Jesse_S Mu-43 Regular

    73
    Jan 7, 2013
    Seattle, WA
    Even on a new iPad, Raw processing is rough at best and probably not worth the time (I've used both photoraw and Pirawna). Like folks mentioned above, every other program seems to just edit the embedded jpg preview, although some do a great job of it (Snapseed, Photogene).

    If you use Lightroom, be sure to check out Photosmith and/or PhotosInfoPro. They don't edit, but will let you tag, star and add keywords and other metadata on the road and then upload it as XMP files along with the photos to LR once you get home. PhotosInfoPro is my personal favorite as it's simple but surprisingly powerful. The iPad works great for this.

    Serious photography is an area that has so much potential on the iPad, but that Apple seems disinclined to pursue or make easy for other developers. It's frustrating.
     
  12. jnewell

    jnewell Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 23, 2011
    Boston, MA
    In addition to lack of speed, your iPad screen is not a calibrated display. Both color and brightness values will be off.
     
  13. runner girl

    runner girl Mu-43 Regular

    192
    Nov 26, 2011
    Thanks everyone! I have Photogene and Snapseed so will use them. My major goal s to post my daily "Project 365" photos and a few others to Facebook. I'll end up uploading the vast majority of the files to Lightroom when I get home so will take a look at the key wording and rating apps.
     
  14. jnewell

    jnewell Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 23, 2011
    Boston, MA
    I've experimented with most of the leading apps - I found Snapseed agreed with me best. I think you'll like both the functionality and the user interface - it's pretty intuitive once you get the basic knack of how it's set up to work. Good luck!
     
  15. robbie36

    robbie36 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 25, 2010
    Bangkok
    rob collins
    Photosmith is good for ratings and tags as it syncs via wifi with LR.
     
  16. betamax

    betamax Mu-43 Regular

    195
    May 7, 2011
    NSW, Australia
    Alan
    Photogene Pro seems quiet powerful, and has a lightroom-type interface, complete with denoise and curves, but I have to admit I haven't really used it since it's so much easier in Lightroom.
     
  17. bassman

    bassman Mu-43 Top Veteran

    678
    Apr 22, 2013
    New Jersey
    Scott
    At Tom's suggestion, I did an experiment and loaded an image shot Raw and one shot Raw+JPG from my E-M5, then opened each with Photogene. I exported each to Dropbox using the maximum resolution available. I did no other editing of the image file.

    The Raw image resulted in a 1.8MB .jpg file. This is apparently the embedded JPG within the Raw file.

    The Raw+JPG image resulted in a 7.3MB .jpg file. This matches the actual size of the .jpg file copy on the SD card. The corresponding .orf file is 14.8MB.

    Note that I didn't have to do anything to select the "+JPG" version in Photogene, it showed me the image and automatically selected the .jpg to open.

    Flterstorm gave the same result for the Raw+JPG version. It tried and failed to properly load the Raw-only version, displaying a blank screen rather than the embedded jpg. While I don't have a Nikon card handy to try, it was able to successfully load .nef files last year, so there's some limitation with the .orf.

    That being said, I find the embedded JPGs completely satisfactory for posting to blogs and sending via email, where they are typically viewed on low resolution devices like phones or tablets anyway.