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Question about transferring my main HD information.

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by sammykhalifa, May 7, 2014.

  1. sammykhalifa

    sammykhalifa Mu-43 Top Veteran

    762
    Jun 22, 2012
    Pittsburgh PA
    Neil
    Hey,

    Currently I'm running 2 drives, one ~250GB that contains most things, and a 2TB drive that I added when I started getting into LR processing. Except for a few backups/non-essentials, that one contains only my photos. With SSDs dropping in prices, I'm been considering upgrading while keeping my big drive intact.

    I've read that you can migrate from your old HD to the new without reinstalling Windows/etc. I know that a fresh install of everything would probably be better but I think I'd rather keep everything intact.

    Would Lightroom hate me for this, though? Has anyone tried this, and does it still know where everything is? It's one of the reasons why I've been putting it off.
     
  2. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    A clone of your boot disc should work ok, but you'll need to have the know-how/software to do it. If the disks are the same capacity, then you can use a simple USB-key Linux boot and use the "dd" utility to do this. If they're different sizes, you'll need to play around with partition tables. There is a Linux tool called "gparted" that should help. I'd recommend you do some googling on the subject.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. sammykhalifa

    sammykhalifa Mu-43 Top Veteran

    762
    Jun 22, 2012
    Pittsburgh PA
    Neil
    Thanks, I'll check those out. Yeah, I'm just in the initial stages of thinking about this but I'm pretty sure I'm up to making that happen after doing the proper research. It'll probably be a while--the wheels of change turn pretty slowly over here, heh.

    I just imagined getting it working, only to find a big problem with Lightroom synching with the images.
     
  4. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    Syncing Lightroom is trivial. You can basically put your catalog and your photos anywhere. When you launch Lightroom, you tell it where the catalog is. If the images are in a new location, you just right click the missing folder in the Lightroom browser and then select the new location. It's smart enough to re-associate all files and subfolders of that folder.

    The harder part is getting Windows migrated - IIRC there's no free live migration tool. The tools I know about require imaging the drive first, and then restoring that image to the new drive.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  5. Fmrvette

    Fmrvette This Space For Rent

    May 26, 2012
    Detroit, Michigan
    Jim
    Hi Sammy!

    I just did this migration in December when I received a Samsung SSD as a gift. My desktop previously had a single 1 TB SATA drive installed. The Samsung came with software which allowed me to make an image of the Windows 8.1 system (including programs). I simply followed the instructions (there were a number of choices available - moving data files too, for example) and installed the SSD as "C" drive. The BIOS boots from that and all data is kept on "K" drive (the 1 TB SATA drive).

    It was quite easy (I didn't write down the steps since I don't intend to perform that exact trick again).

    The only glitch was some additional software that Samsung included; I had to disable that junk after the install was complete.

    None of the programs caused a problem, except that I had to manually update the 'default' data file location (was on "C", now on"K") in a couple of programs.

    Of course all brands of SSD are different but I don't think you'll have an issue with Lightroom.

    A clean install is always enticing but the Samsung software did a very nice job of putting everything where it belonged. I did go through and delete some old programs that I don't use anymore and ran a disk cleanup on the SATA drive before performing the Samsung installation.

    My computer now has several built in 'drives' for memory cards, two hard drives, a DVD drive, and currently two external drives and the Windows installation on the Samsung has had no problems keeping track of 'what is what'.

    One caveat - if you have defragmentation of your hard drive set as a scheduled task you'll want to turn that off for the SSD; they have different defragging requirements than a standard SATA drive.

    Performance wise the boot time is faster and programs launch quicker but of course they rely on the SATA drive for loading the data so performance isn't "instantaneous"; I've considered pulling the 1 TB drive out of one of my laptops and replacing it with an SSD to see how fast it would be with everything on a single drive but I have more time than money so speeding up an already acceptably quick laptop wouldn't get me much :biggrin:.

    I hope this helps.

    Regards,

    Jim
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. mcasan

    mcasan Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 26, 2014
    Atlanta
    Some SSDs come with a migration kit. It is basically a USB3 to SATA cable for cloning the SSD before it replaces the target spinning platter. The kit should including some cloning software like Carbon Copy Cloner. If you had a Mac you would not need that and could use basic tools in the OS to format and close the SSD.

    Do a full backup before starting...just in case. Once the target drive is cloned to the SSD, boot from the SSD to make sure it is good. Then power off and replace the HD with the SSD. Boot up (much faster) and check that everything is OK.

    You should be able to find lots of videos on Youtube for SSD installations.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    Since you basically have the OS and programs on the C drive and data on the D drive the whole thing can be trivial. I only use Samsung and Intel SSDs because of their high reliability. Both companies either ship with software, or have software on their site, for cloning a drive. (I've used both and they worked without problems.) In your case you just clone your C drive to the SSD.

    Migration kits (USB to SATA adapters) are only needed for laptops, unless all your SATA ports are being used.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. sammykhalifa

    sammykhalifa Mu-43 Top Veteran

    762
    Jun 22, 2012
    Pittsburgh PA
    Neil
    Thanks for the advice and experience, guys. This sounds like it should be a pretty easy process, for a decent gain in performance since the price of these drives have gotten a bit more reasonable.
     
  9. sammykhalifa

    sammykhalifa Mu-43 Top Veteran

    762
    Jun 22, 2012
    Pittsburgh PA
    Neil
    Just an update--I picked up the Crucial 240GB for $115, and it arrived yesterday. Samsung was my first choice, but they were running about 150 which didn't really seem worth it.

    Everything was up and running great within an hour or two (would have been faster but the computer went to sleep when it was transferring files and I was out of the building). For anyone that's interested, I used some free software to move everything over, Reflect by Macrium, but I'm assuming most of them are about the same.

    It does make the big difference that everyone says it makes, doesn't it?
     
  10. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    Oh yes, especially when it comes to programs that are bottlenecked by lots of small reads and writes from different files.