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Question about GF1 manual mode

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by mzd, Jan 13, 2011.

  1. mzd

    mzd Mu-43 Veteran

    241
    Nov 30, 2010
    Wisconsin
    Hello all. I'm very new to the :43: system. My fiancee and I got each other the GF1 w/ 20mm for Christmas so I've only had a few weeks to play with it. My current shooting style is to first spot meter in Aperture mode and then move to Manual and do most of my shooting there, making adjustments to both aperture and shutter speed as necessary. I've noticed that in Manual mode, the exposure compensation graph updates (+/- EV) as the camera is moved around. Is this just a suggestion based on the camera's meter? I don't think the camera is actually applying that setting on it's own because as far as I've noticed, I don't think any of my shots have EV comp when I bring them up in Lightroom.
    I'm also curious as to how setting the ISO sensitivity to 1/3 EV actually works. Is there truly 640 ISO or does the camera just split the difference between 400 and 800?
     
  2. stratokaster

    stratokaster Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 4, 2011
    Kyiv, Ukraine
    Pavel
    Yes, this is just a suggestion. The camera shows how much the image is over- or underexposed in its opinion.

    As far as I understand, ISO 640 image is just an underexposed ISO 400 image.
     
  3. mzd

    mzd Mu-43 Veteran

    241
    Nov 30, 2010
    Wisconsin
    thanks stratokaster!
    i did notice that in Auto ISO mode, the camera will choose the intermediate ISO values regardless of whether you have them enabled in the menu.
     
  4. ~tc~

    ~tc~ Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 22, 2010
    Houston, TX
    "Program shift" allows you to do what you are without having to change the mode dial and decrease the chances of a hugely missed exposure.
     
  5. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    Why not spot meter in manual mode and skip the middle man?
     
  6. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    PS- I am new to Panasonic and m/4/3 cameras, but, (the big but), from what I understand, for most Canon cameras, the "standard" ISOs, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600 and then whatever the camera sets as standard, are ISO that are "electronically amplified" from "base", where light collected is optimized as much as possible. For Canon, ISO 100 is considered a base. So, ISO 200 amplifies an ISO 100 by a stop.

    The +1/3 intermediate ISO's are amplified by software, whereas the +2/3 intermediate ISOs are reduced from the next-highest ISO. So, ISO 125 is actually an ISO 100 shot that has been boosted by software by 1/3 of a stop to attain the "proper exposure" but this boosting makes that ISO more vulnerable to noise in the shadows, whereas an ISO 160 shot will actually be an ISO 100 shot, amplified electronically to ISO 200, then reduced in software. It will have less shadow noise because you have actually brought down exposure, but will have less latitude in the highlights.

    Then, the High and Low ISO follow a similar pattern -- Low ISOs will lower the exposure of the next "real" ISO up, so that ISO 50 allows a slower shutter speed then takes that overexposed shot and lowers the exposure in software by a stop. In the same way an "H" ISO will allow an underexposed shot and boost it by a stop.

    In short, I'd say that if you are shooting JPEG, use what will give you the best results out-of-the-camera and let the camera do it's calculations, but if shooting RAW, you can match or beat those results if you understand the process involved.

    I suspect the above is true for most digital cameras.

    Gary
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. mzd

    mzd Mu-43 Veteran

    241
    Nov 30, 2010
    Wisconsin
    Thanks for the replies! I am very much still learning and getting a feel for the camera. I guess I use Aperture priority as a starting point, thinking I will stay there, but, particularly in lower light indoors settings, the exposure is all over the place so I end up switching to Manual pretty quickly for more control.
    I had heard about Canon's ISO handling from my brother-in-law but wasn't sure if Panasonic handled those intermediate ISO values the same way.
     
  8. ~tc~

    ~tc~ Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 22, 2010
    Houston, TX
    Whatever works, but I find using spot metering and the exposure compensation on the dial easier.

    Remember that the screen is not WYSIWYG in live-view mode. It will always gain up for "proper" brightness. You need to hit the DOF preview/trash button then the display button to make the display reflect your exposure settings. (This, BTW, being about my only complaint about the operation of the camera)