Quarterly mirrorless sales

Discussion in 'Micro 4/3 News and Rumors' started by dhazeghi, Apr 30, 2013.

  1. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    Thom Hogan posted a chart of mirrorless (and DSLR) sales from the past 5 quarters. We don't have the breakdown for m4/3 compared to the other systems, but overall it looks like mirrorless is dropping as a proportion of the market. Not what I would have expected.
     
  2. DynaSport

    DynaSport Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 5, 2013
    Dan
    I don't believe I have ever seen anyone else out shooting with a M4/3 camera. I see lots of P&S and a fair number of dslrs. All my friends, who are really just casual photographers that bought cameras to take pictures of their kids have purchased either Canon or Nikon dslrs. Olympus and Panasonic need to do better marketing or their market share could continue to drop.

    I am enjoying my E-PM1 and haven't used my dslr in a long time except for portrait work. I may even try the mini pen next time for that too.
     
  3. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    In my locale,
    I've seen more Olympus Four Thirds shooters than I have of both Panasonic & Olympus MFT shooters....
     
  4. Geoff3DMN

    Geoff3DMN Mu-43 Veteran

    Excluding Mu-43.com meet ups; most of the people I see shooting are using DSLR's, about 2/3rds Canon and about 1/3rds Nikon and most are entry level with kit lenses.
     
  5. twokatmew

    twokatmew Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 1, 2012
    Lansing, MI, US
    Margaret
    All I ever see are Canon/Nikon DSLRs, an occasional Pentax or Oly, a few P&Ss and lots of camera phones. I'm always the only one w/ m43. While shooting with my E-M5 at the Gilmore car museum, I saw lots of entry-level DSLRs with kit lenses. An older gentleman (sans camera) came over and asked me about my E-M5. Even after he learned it wasn't a film camera, he was very interested. I usually get a "what's that?" when I explain that my camera is micro four thirds.

    I liked my Pentax for its IBIS and fantastic small primes, but even that kit felt too big, hence my move to m43 and Oly bodies in particular. I really want to see mirrorless and especially m43 gain more popularity.
    --
    Sent from my Kindle Fire HD. Please pardon my brevity!
     
  6. supermaxv

    supermaxv Mu-43 Veteran

    273
    Sep 20, 2011
    Out and about, I have seen plenty of cameras of all sorts (including 4/3rds DSLRs, large gripped Full Frame DSLRs with high end fast zooms, NEXs, point and shoots, etc), but I have only seen maybe 6 other people carrying and/or using a Micro 4/3rds camera. Heck, I've seen just nearly as many people carrying around and using medium format film cameras like Holgas or TLRs than Micro 4/3rds cameras.

    Out of curiosity, to the OP, why is this not what you expected?
     
  7. M4/3

    M4/3 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    713
    Sep 24, 2011
    I can't recall seeing hardly significant mirrorless advertizing from Panasonic and Olympus since the original E-PL1 commercial
    [ame=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2E25em-brl8]The Amazing Olympus PEN E-PL1 Camera - YouTube[/ame]
     
  8. Johnny_Alucard

    Johnny_Alucard Mu-43 Veteran

    303
    Apr 28, 2013
    In the UK I only ever seem to see people with Canon and Nikon DSLRs these days. The only other people I've ever seen shooting m43 on the streets are East Asian tourists. In fact, in London I reckon I see far more people taking photos with their phones than with cameras!
     
  9. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    Nikon's marketing machine works great, and if size isn't a priorty, you can get a lot of camera for not a lot of money with Canon or Nikon. The vast majority of bodies and lenses I see in 'the wild' are entry-level or one step up (xxxD series Canon, 3000 series Nikon) DSLRs with kit or third-party superzooms. When you can get a starter kit with a current generation sensor (= better than any of the entry level Panasonics or cheaper PENs, and for some models better than any MFT sensor) with tracking AF (lots of buyers seem to be young parents) for 400-500 from CaNikon, it doesn't surprise me. Add increasingly affordable fullframe options (1500 USD, new) for the enthusiast crowd and the picture's complete.

    I realize I'm paying a slight premium for the combination of portability and quality, and that's fine with me. There's also the fact panasonic and Olympus don't have the clout Canon, Nikon or even Sony (their video and cybershot point and shoots have been around long enough now) have with consumers, and Panasonic/Olympus marketing is essentially non-existant. Better marketing, better sensors faster, and lower price might help the push.
     
  10. Iansky

    Iansky Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 26, 2009
    The Cotswolds, UK
    Despite the growing popularity, the two major players (Canon / Nikon) are the most common cameras visible amongst tourists/photographers and they are the ones that advertise the most across all mediums.

    Sony through it's advertising is growing in popularity amongst the small compact users.

    In the UK, I do not recall having seen any productive promotions/advertising campaigns that capture the imagination of interested parties and promote advantages of the format so it is not common to see photographers using Mu43 in comparison to DSLR's and I suspect it will be a long time coming before we do see more evidence of this format being widely used.

    I think both Olympus & Panasonic would benfit from more advertising on prime time TV but costs make this prohibitive and the big boys still dominate.
     
  11. Al.

    Al. Mu-43 Veteran

    372
    Jul 3, 2010
    Hull, East Yorkshire, UK
    Alan
    I have seen advertising for both Olympus and Panasonic on national TV, although not prime time.

    Pana advertising the G series and Oly the Pen series

    I had a look through some current Photography mags and every credit was for Can/\Nik, in 4 magazines saw 2 credits for Pana and 3 for leica and a couple of medium format

    I think we live in a bubble on this forum, thinking :43: is the centre of the universe, but we keep battling on and banging the drum for :43:
     
  12. slothead

    slothead Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 14, 2012
    Frederick, MD
    I'm not too motivated by this topic, but I will comment that I think the general public is just recently finding DSLRs, and the industry is creating more DSLR sales by including more P&S settings in DSLR cameras to increase sales (successfully). It is my further my opinion, that more serious fotogs are slowly switching to Mu43 for a number of reasons, but of course (as evidenced by these curves) this opinion has not yet been proven. Once the lens situation has been resolved (more new, long, lenses) assuming that new technology doesn't curtail it, I think the move will continue toward smaller (e.g., Mu43, et al) will continue to evolve.
     
  13. briloop

    briloop Mu-43 Regular

    171
    May 23, 2012
    Mount Juliet, TN
    I attend meet ups in the Austin area about twice a month on average. The types of cameras I've seen usually are Canon and Nikon DSLRs, roughly 50-50 split between full frame and APS-C/DX. At one meet up, there were 17 photographers, 4 of whom had OM-Ds. I am almost always the only photographer with a m43 camera. I agree with some of the previous posts in that I think Olympus and Panasonic need to do more marketing.
     
  14. drd1135

    drd1135 Zen Snapshooter

    Mar 17, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Steve
    My version of several points, both of which have already been made:
    1. The dominant cameras are cells phones for static subjects. These are used for many of the subjects for which we use Pens and Gs. What's funny is that the "small and light and take it everywhere" argument for mu43 does win but is beat out by the smaller cellphones.
    2. At least in the US, many folks who move beyond compacts/cells phones are primarily taking pictures of their children/grandchildren and DSLRS do have superior AF-C.

    I don't know what drives the markets in Asia and Europe, but not much reason in people's minds to move to mu43 in the North America. Of course, marketing solves many problems, but it's expensive. My own view is that mu43 is concentrating on Asia and hoping it catches on elsewhere.
     
  15. ssgreenley

    ssgreenley Mu-43 Top Veteran

    509
    May 12, 2011
    This seems extremely correct. I'll add that I often see m4/3 on the streets of DC, and have seen them in touristy spots in Europe, but almost always sported by Asian tourists.
     
  16. marcsitkin

    marcsitkin Mu-43 Veteran

    307
    Jan 24, 2013
    Harwich, MA USA
    Marc Sitkin
    I think it's due to poor marketing because of an unclear message about the benefits of the system, as well as problems with the distribution channel. Even among other pro's, there's a reluctance to try something new because they're afraid that their clients will perceive them as using "non-professional" gear.
     
  17. dornblaser

    dornblaser Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 13, 2012
    Chicago-area
    David Dornblaser
    I think the distribution channel is an important key. I have three local camera stores near me. The first one, an independent shop in my hometown does not carry :43: and actively bad mouths Olympus because of their "financial problems". The second store is a small store from a regional chain and they wish they be allowed to had more than one PEN camera, still it is displayed with the P&S. The third is a large store of a large national chain, this store has all of the "pro" stuff including amazing amount lighting options and large format paper. They carry all the "pro" Nikon and Canon bodies and glass. The salesperson I spoke with last week did not disguise his distaste for :43:. He suggested that if I was interested in :43: I should try the Chicago store (this store is in Oak Brook, IL an affluent suburb). Finally, Best Buy near me has the Nikon and Canon mirrorless cameras along with the one Panasonic. Naturally, they have lots of P&S and Nikon and Canon entry level cameras and lenses as you would expect. My point is that even if you wanted to take up :43: you would be hard pressed to see on in person and have a knowledge salesperson help you. At least, here in suburban Chicago. That is high hurdle to overcome for a new camera system. I suspect that many or most of us on this board have previous photography experience and purchased some to all of our :43: gear online.
     
  18. marcsitkin

    marcsitkin Mu-43 Veteran

    307
    Jan 24, 2013
    Harwich, MA USA
    Marc Sitkin
    I've gotten most of my mft gear through Amazon, which has a good return policy. Calumet had nothing in the local store, but one of the guys told me that before Calumet bought them out (it was Ritz or Wolf), he picked up the remaining Oly stock for a fraction of the selling price. The other two local stores, Delray camera, had a used Oly Pen in the case, no new gear, and The Pro Shop of West Palm, had nothing.
     
  19. dornblaser

    dornblaser Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 13, 2012
    Chicago-area
    David Dornblaser
    Calumet is the third store that I referred to in my post.
     
  20. swampduck

    swampduck Mu-43 Veteran

    335
    Mar 29, 2013
    Taneytown , MD
    Dan
    I think it is due to the local channel availability as well. I bought my E-PL1 from Penn Camera, that got bought out by Cameta. They promptly closed all the Baltimore area stores. They only have presence in DC now. Best Buy used to carry some of the Lite Oly's, but now all they have are the Nikon and Sony NEX line. I for one didn't know about the m4/3 cameras when I purchased mine. I originally went to buy the Canon G11 and walked out with the E-PL1. At the time I liked the smaller footprint which is why I was looking at the G11, but found I could get the same with interchangeable lenses in m/4/3. That being said, I found I missed the ergonomics of the DSLR, and hence ended up purchasing the G5, which I am currently waiting for. I admit, that I when I am out and about shooting and see the Canon DSLR people I sometimes fondly remember those days and start looking at them again. But for me, once I see the price tags of the lenses, that quickly goes away again.
    It was pointed out to me on this forum that it is an apples to oranges comaprison, but I am still liking the fact I can buy a fast prime or long zoom for less then $500