Process on iPad? Or not...

Discussion in 'Image Processing' started by zettapixel, Jul 23, 2014.

  1. zettapixel

    zettapixel Mu-43 Veteran

    470
    Aug 12, 2010
    NY
    Hi,

    Although the Lightroom for PC is my primary processing tool I wondered if we a re far enough into XXI century to process photos on iPad.
    What I like - portability, nice screen close to my eyes, (assumingly) powerful controls - I'm a fan of touchscreen devices in general.

    We went to Poconos for a week and I decided to process the pictures on iPad this time, without waiting to get home.

    Also some functionality is not there, altogether I'm happy with the results for web (http://barshay.org/p727968325), used iPhoto, Filterstorm Neue and Snapseed, all of which process RAW files. Each is good in its own way but at the end I'm still wondering if I actually use the advantages of the RAW files.
    Most importantly, does anyone knows if the image editing is 16-bit in any of the editors or are they just shortcuts to what essentially is jpeg editing? I though this info should be all around the web but could google out anything useful...

    Some pictures (most of these are macros with Canon FD 50/3.5)


    p743146823-4.



    p400771822-4.



    p852994159-4.



    p985952019-4.



    p156008419-4.




    p1027180852-5.


    Thank you
     
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  2. Harvey Melvin Richards

    Harvey Melvin Richards Photo Posting Junkie

    Feb 15, 2014
    Southwest Utah
    Do these programs really use the RAW, or do they pull the jpg file from the RAW. From what I've read, there are no iPad apps that really use RAW (except possibly LR).
     
  3. zettapixel

    zettapixel Mu-43 Veteran

    470
    Aug 12, 2010
    NY
    That's the problem, with iPad everything is hidden so I don't really know. The process starts with importing RAW file into iPad.
    Does it stay RAW? Is it converted to an intermediary format? I've no idea, but iPhoto does show it is a "RAW" image and all programs can open it. Also, Filterstorm claims to use DCRAW for RAW file processing.
    So there is at least some evidence that what gets processed is actual RAW files. It's not enough evidence to convince me though :smile: and I have no idea how the images are treated internally.

    BTW, there is a bug in Filterstorm Neue (maybe in DCRAW) that causes EXIF data to be missing from the exported image for the RAW files. It does not happen for JPEGs.
     
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  4. bassman

    bassman Mu-43 Top Veteran

    680
    Apr 22, 2013
    New Jersey
    Scott
    We were in Europe for a couple of weeks in May and I published a daily photo-heavy blog each day for friends and family.

    http://abbeystudiocroatia.blogspot.com

    Snapseed was the primary processor.
     
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  5. zettapixel

    zettapixel Mu-43 Veteran

    470
    Aug 12, 2010
    NY
    I liked some of the Snapseed's filters.
    iPhoto is more limiting but what it does, it does well and is very comfortable to use.

    Fiterstorm IMHO has the best UI, the masks are very nice to use and feature set is very good.
    If not for the bug I mentioned it would've been my favorite.
     
  6. yakky

    yakky Mu-43 Top Veteran

    662
    Jul 1, 2013
    Shoot black and white JPEG+Raw, the stored jpeg should be B&W shouldn't it? If the app shows color its getting it from the raw...
     
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  7. Harvey Melvin Richards

    Harvey Melvin Richards Photo Posting Junkie

    Feb 15, 2014
    Southwest Utah
    I was under the impression that RAW images have an embedded JPEG, and this is what most if not all iPad apps are using. Am I wrong once again?
     
  8. robbie36

    robbie36 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 25, 2010
    Bangkok
    rob collins
    Unless something has changed, I expect you are right.

    http://support.apple.com/kb/HT5182
     
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  9. Harvey Melvin Richards

    Harvey Melvin Richards Photo Posting Junkie

    Feb 15, 2014
    Southwest Utah
    That is what I thought. Then the problem becomes RAW files on your iPad, they take up lots of space, you can't use them, and it's difficult to remove them.
     
  10. zettapixel

    zettapixel Mu-43 Veteran

    470
    Aug 12, 2010
    NY
  11. zettapixel

    zettapixel Mu-43 Veteran

    470
    Aug 12, 2010
    NY
    Alrighty then, made a raw shot set to monochrome:
    - imported image looks B&W in the album
    - iPhoto opens B&W image
    - Snapseed opens B&W image
    - Filterstorm Neue opens a color image :thumbup:

    It's a pity Filterstorm screws up EXIF. Focal length is there but time stamp isn't
     
  12. gryphon1911

    gryphon1911 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 13, 2014
    Central Ohio, USA
    Andrew
    I don't use Apple products, but all my Android/Chrome devices are capable of basic post processing from all my camera. On the tablet device(Samsung Galaxy Note 8) I use Snapseed and on the Chromebook(HP Chromebook 14) I am using Pixlr Editor(online) or Pixlr Touch Up(offline).

    So to directly answer your question, it is possible to work on images out in the field with a cell, tablet or Chromebook. I would not replace my at home workhorse, but it is a nice portable alternative for blogging, social media or on vacation sharing.

    These links might be of interest to you - from my blog:

    http://bestlightphoto.blogspot.com/2014/06/what-can-be-done-with-chromebook-in-2014.html

    From my Flickr stream - all images processed using Snapseed:
    https://www.flickr.com/search/?q=snapseed&ss=2&ct=0&mt=photos&w=7293511@N04&adv=1
     
  13. mcasan

    mcasan Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 26, 2014
    Atlanta
    And when you find a way to use your Lr plugins on an iPad, let us know. Personally I can't see iPad as part of any workflow. As a monitor for tethered shooting OK. As a way to show finished images, fine. But any decent laptop has far more resources (CPU, GPU, memory, storage) than an iPad. And some laptops have much larger Retina screens.
     
  14. gryphon1911

    gryphon1911 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 13, 2014
    Central Ohio, USA
    Andrew
    Give Adobe some time, it might happen sometime in the near future.
     
  15. fredlong

    fredlong Just this guy...

    Apr 18, 2011
    Massachusetts USA
    Fred
    PiRAWna and PhotoRaw both convert raw files. Photogene will also convert raw files and is also a more general purpose editor. Most other editors, including iPhoto and Snapseed, open the embedded jpeg.

    There may be other editors that can handle raw conversions, but I haven't been keeping up. My iPad 2 is a bit slow for that kind of work. I'd like to try one of the current models to see the star of the art is. I think, for me, for the time being, a tablet is only for occasional use in photo editing.

    Fred
     
  16. chipbutty

    chipbutty Mu-43 Veteran

    That certainly used to be the case but things have changed. Photogene definitely decodes the Raw files as does Filterstorm. I just beta tested the latest version of Photogene as they were having issues with Fuji RAF files.


     
  17. zettapixel

    zettapixel Mu-43 Veteran

    470
    Aug 12, 2010
    NY
    I generally can keep iPad closer to my eyes than laptops so the difference is not that large.
    Also IMHO laptops in the same price range are 1) much larger/heavier, 2) don't have great screens either. I'm don't want to take a $1700 15" laptop with me on the trips.
    Second, and one of the reason I chose iPad vs Android devices (all my phones have been Androids for years) is 4:3 aspect ratio, which, depending on editor's layout, can also lessen the size difference.
    Other than that there are just technicalities. I'm considering it for travel photos - I hardly ever use LR plugins for those anyway. And I'm not really against 8-bit processing either - just not for color manipulation...
     
  18. chipbutty

    chipbutty Mu-43 Veteran

    Nice images Zettapixel. I've just had a two week holiday and during that time I really enjoyed processing some images on the iPad with Snapseed, Photogene, CameraBag 2 and Analog. I love Snapseed. I usually wait until I get home and process the Raw files in Capture One or Lightroom. I have to say that I'm delighted with the results I get processing on the iPad. Sometimes I don't even run the Raw file via Photogene and just process a high quality camera JPEG (not the embedded JPEG in the Raw file).

    Obviously you're going to get to get superior results processing Raws with dedicated computer software, especially when it comes to highlight and shadow recovery, but if you have a well exposed image you can get some wonderful results with something like Snapseed.

    These holiday photos are all processed on the iPad.

    A few examples

    14687617856_b9b9f6ed65_b.

    img_0851
    by Rob.J.Davis, on Flickr

    14699223624_e6809ff4b3_b.

    Man On a Mission
    by Rob.J.Davis, on Flickr

    14514104617_caa41bfa9c_b.

    IMG_0816-3395588972-O
    by Rob.J.Davis, on Flickr
     
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  19. zettapixel

    zettapixel Mu-43 Veteran

    470
    Aug 12, 2010
    NY
    Tried to play yesterday with Filterstorm (after my test showed it indeed works with RAW file) and PhotoRaw Lite (free). PhotoRaw claims to use 16-bit processing.

    It takes time for Filterstorm to open the RAW file (message: "converting RAW"), but after that Filterstorm works much faster than PhotoRaw (using the same image as a source) and takes significantly less RAM. This seems to indicate that Filterstorm actually converts the RAW into an intermediate, more processing friendly, format on opening.
    When zooming the image in Filterstorm appeared to have less detail than the one in PhotoRaw. I'll do more research tonight...

    PhotoRaw Lite doesn't export images through, the full version is $10. Not a lot of money but I wasn't really impressed. It's slower but the lag is tolerable on iPad Air. UI kind of stinks - it doesn't even have a histogram...

    Pirawnha is $10 too. I wasn't too impressed with reviews but they're all from 2011, they added live view some time ago judging by their info.
    Just found this statement in their manual (hey, kudos to Pirawnha to even have the manual!!!)
    "At this time due to available memory on the iPad, raw images larger than 15 megapixels will be exported as smaller images that are one-half full-size in width and height."
    Although I think E-M5 actually should fit that's not a great limitation. And it seems kind of arbitrary too with expanding hardware and all that...
     
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  20. zettapixel

    zettapixel Mu-43 Veteran

    470
    Aug 12, 2010
    NY
    Thank you Rob, I should give Photogene a closer look.

    Very nice!!! Looks like Snapseed...which filter did you use for it?