Problems with skin tone reproduction with GX7

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by jonbrisbincreative, Oct 10, 2014.

  1. jonbrisbincreative

    jonbrisbincreative Mu-43 Regular

    Mar 30, 2014
    I like the GX7 so far. I like the ergonomics and the sensor does a good job in most conditions. The only area I've had some issues with it is on portraiture using a 400w/s strobe and fill lights. I get the photo adjusted to a sane level and when the prints come back from the print service the skin tones are just slightly grayed. In most cases it's not a big issue but I did have one irate mother who wouldn't show the photos to her daughter until I "fixed" the gray cast to a more natural skin tone and sent her some new prints. I was just preparing another batch of portraits today and I did notice a slight change to the skin tones that, if allowed to get much more obvious, would definitely change the color.

    I don't have examples because what I see on screen is not really what is in print and the changes are subtle. I know about calibrated monitors and what not but I've never had an issue with skin tones before. I'm starting to think that, with the E-M1 now taking center stage in my arsenal, I'm getting to the point of ditching the GX7 in favor of an E-M10 or something to use as secondary prime lens/backup camera. I like the camera and I like the colors but the skin tone reproduction is, to me, not quite right and I'm honestly not sure at all what needs tweaking to bring them back in line.

    I know there's a lot of moving pieces between Lightroom and Mpix's printers. I get all that. But I only see this on prints made from the Panasonic so far so it seems to be something emanating from the sensor and/or Lightroom's handling of the RAW files (even though they look great on screen).
  2. T N Args

    T N Args Agent Photocateur

    Dec 3, 2013
    Adelaide, Australia
    Real Name:
    call me Arg
    What's a 'gray cast'? or 'grayed skin tones'?

    You make it clear that you are not running calibrated monitors. You might have been lucky so far, but that approach is really rolling the dice and you can get bitten any day, any how. The fact that you were holding a GX7 when the day came, says nothing about the camera or about your future luck with other cameras.

    How can you say that you are getting it right on the monitor but not right on the prints, yet think that the camera sensor is to blame?

    This photo is the same camera sensor.... no PP except white point. Are you getting skin tones like that? Do you see it as grey on your monitor?