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Problem Weeing Polarizer Effect with EVF and Monitor

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by Lou616, Jul 24, 2014.

  1. Lou616

    Lou616 Mu-43 Rookie

    13
    Jun 6, 2013
    Holland, MI
    Lou Pepoy
    I haven't been photographing for some while and thought that I would get out for a little shooting yesterday. I had forgotten how difficult (I find it) to know just when the filter is polarizing the scene (Not always a 90 deg. to the sun). With a viewfinder on my DSLR I didn't have such difficulty. I like to use the polarizer for the improved color I obtain under a variety of lighting conditions. Sometimes I'll remove the filter, view the scene and rotate the filter, and then remount it with the index in the proper position. Lots of fussing around.

    Any suggestions on what I may be missing, or it that the way with an EVF or monitor?





    E-M5, O 12-40mm, P 35-100mm, N 135mm, N 200mm
     
  2. budeny

    budeny Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 4, 2014
    Boulder, CO
    You may use Vivid or Art-Dramatic settings to make effect more pronounced, but then you'll have to process raw in Olympus Viewer to settings that you actually need.
     
  3. Lou616

    Lou616 Mu-43 Rookie

    13
    Jun 6, 2013
    Holland, MI
    Lou Pepoy
    I tried your suggestions -- Vivid or Art Dramatic. The Vivid could be of some help, the Art Dramatic has too much black 'mist' to make it very useful.

    I did a very unscientific comparison of my polarizers (all Hoya in this case) to see if the index mark on the rotating rings would line up in roughly the same place when viewing the scene by looking through the filter and rotating the ring. In all five examples, the index marks did pretty closely line up in the same place. So, unless I'm facing a scene where I'd get maximum polarization, I will rig up an extra (old) polarizer to view the scene and note the orientation of the index mark, and do the same on the filter on the lens. Maybe Super Glue the filter to a partial filter wrench and pull it out when needed.

    Thanks.
     
  4. budeny

    budeny Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 4, 2014
    Boulder, CO
    Or if you're wearing polarized sunglasses, you can calibrate your filter to them.
     
  5. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    The title suggested that you might need more beer. :biggrin:
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. Paul80

    Paul80 Mu-43 Veteran

    254
    Jul 6, 2014
    Yep don't miss when you are Weeing on your filter & EVF ;)

    Paul
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. Lou616

    Lou616 Mu-43 Rookie

    13
    Jun 6, 2013
    Holland, MI
    Lou Pepoy
    Yeah! That was my mistake in hitting 'W' instead of 'S'. My bad!

    Actually, since I usually shoot stationary subjects, it isn't a problem. It would be like looking at my watch before a shot. And I would always be using a polarizer.

    Lou
     
  8. alan1972

    alan1972 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    592
    Jun 23, 2012
    Malaga, Spain
    Alan Grant
    I am not sure if this is the specific issue you are having, but if you are using auto exposure (any mode except M), the camera may be adjusting the exposure as you rotate the filter. As this shows up immediately in the EVF, it can make it harder to see the effect of the filter in isolation. I sometimes use Auto Exposure Lock temporarily to hold the exposure constant until I am happy with the filter position.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. fortwodriver

    fortwodriver Mu-43 Top Veteran

    957
    Nov 15, 2013
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Frank
    Sounds like you need a polarizer + an ND filter - or you're facing the wrong way. The Polarizer requires the sun to be at 90 degrees to work. If you aren't, it won't do much. But that's no reason to wee on your filters - unless you're looking for kidney stones! *ping!*
     
  10. Lou616

    Lou616 Mu-43 Rookie

    13
    Jun 6, 2013
    Holland, MI
    Lou Pepoy
    The suggestion about auto settings may have something to do with it. I usually shoot in Aperture priority. I'll check it out tomorrow in daylight.

    I know that maximum polarization occurs at 90 deg. to the sun, but I don't always shoot at 90 deg. from the sun. It's weaker polarization, but, to me, it's what's needed to deepen the colors/reduce reflections.

    In any case, I always clean my filter a 'wee' bit.

    Lou
     
  11. bassman

    bassman Mu-43 Top Veteran

    678
    Apr 22, 2013
    New Jersey
    Scott
    The polarizer reduces the amount of light reaching your sensor, and reduces it the most at max polarization. So watch the exposure and set the polarizer to where you need the most exposure. I find this helps me.
     
  12. lightmonkey

    lightmonkey Mu-43 Veteran

    480
    Dec 22, 2013
    i remember on my polarizers the polarization axes. which is aligned with the branding or other marking. [except on zeiss *t filter where its a bit off angle!!!]


    the problem is i usually forget to rotate the filter when i shoot in landscape. or forget to rotate the filter when shooting wide on the zoom!!!