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Preying Mantis in the garden

Discussion in 'Nature' started by s0nus, Sep 5, 2011.

  1. s0nus

    s0nus Mu-43 Veteran

    424
    Dec 13, 2010
    Chicago
    Came across this mantis in the garden. He happily posed as I snapped away. He was looking right back at me the whole time!

    Shot with my EPL1 and Fujian 35mm f1.7 with extension tubes.

    [​IMG]

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    • Like Like x 16
  2. bilzmale

    bilzmale Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nicely done - love their 'alien' features.
     
  3. DekHog

    DekHog Mu-43 Top Veteran

    579
    May 3, 2011
    Scotland
    He's certainly eyeballing you on every shot.... I was going to say I wish we had critters like that here, but I'm not so sure about that! Nice shots....
     
  4. Lovely colours and shapes, and the thin DOF works well for my eye (it often doesn't), really drawing my eyes to his (hers?). And so very alien.

    Beautiful, entrancing images.
     
  5. s0nus

    s0nus Mu-43 Veteran

    424
    Dec 13, 2010
    Chicago
    Thanks everyone for taking a look!
     
  6. robertmwilliams

    robertmwilliams Mu-43 Regular

    Very nice shots!
    All Hail Zorak!
     
  7. krugorg

    krugorg Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jul 18, 2011
    Minnesota USA
    Awesome shots - what a little poser! :smile:

    I was fascinated by these guys when I was a kid... seem to remember a book spurred my interest. Now this post drove me to do a web search and, what do ya know, you can now have a pet mantid running around your home:

    Mantids for Sale - Mantis Pets - Home of the Praying Mantis

    Can you imagine waking up to a mantid staring you in the face?
     
  8. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    Nice shot, I have them here ... very cool, very beneficial, very voracious and agressive insect. When they're born they're about the size of a red ant. He was sizing you up to determine what BBQ sauce would be appropriate.
     
  9. s0nus

    s0nus Mu-43 Veteran

    424
    Dec 13, 2010
    Chicago
    The garden that these were shot in is my mother's, who is a very avid and accomplished gardener. She actually purchased baby (not sure if hatched or still in eggs) mantises (mantii?) for the beneficial properties that Gary referred to, namely to prey on all the other bugs that she doesn't want in her vegetables. This mantis was in her garden, so it's not that incredible that we found him.

    Coincidentally, the very same day I found the mantis pictured here, another "wild" one (that is to say, not purchased) landed on my south facing window at my house (miles away from my mother's place), and stayed there in the sun for nearly the entire day. This one was more brown than green. Maybe he was preparing for the Fall season.

    Two mantises in one day, when I haven't seen one in years. Some sort of sign, perhaps? ;-)

    Anyway, thanks again everyone. I'm really getting a kick out of this cheapo Fujian and enjoy the feel of manual aperture and manual focusing. The images straight out the camera are nothing to write home about, but shooting RAW with some simple PP can really make the images pop. With the extension rings, this lens get more use than my Vivitar Series 1 105mm macro, which is unwieldy handheld, and even on the tripod (no tripod collar!).
     
  10. ~tc~

    ~tc~ Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 22, 2010
    Houston, TX
    Sure it's a "he"? Thought they were much smaller and didn't really look like praying mantis ...
     
  11. s0nus

    s0nus Mu-43 Veteran

    424
    Dec 13, 2010
    Chicago
    Good point! I believe gardenerassistant pointed out the same.

    Such a creature naturally gets the masculine designation in my mind. Although, for many species, even mammalian, it is the female that that is the "breadwinner" so to speak.
     
  12. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    I found a Mantis pod/pouch in the yard and sent it to grade school, in a small paper bag, with my oldest daughter. After a day or so the class finally opened the paper bag, the Manti had hatched and the opening release hundreds of Mantis into the classroom.

    It was all great fun for the class as the baby Manti are little larger than a red ant but look identical to an adult.

    G
     
  13. s0nus

    s0nus Mu-43 Veteran

    424
    Dec 13, 2010
    Chicago
    What did they end up doing with the babies? I hope they let them live!
     
  14. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    Nothing ... they all sorta escaped.

    G
     
  15. He he. I wish. But no, I didn't have a clue and was just playing it safe.:biggrin:

    (Don't be fooled by the "gardenersassistant" thing. My knowledge of gardens and the things in them is pretty much limited to understanding "dig a hole here and don't step on that" and such like. As to what any of the plants and animals are - with a few exceptions, I have no idea, no matter how many times I am told.:frown:)
     
  16. s0nus

    s0nus Mu-43 Veteran

    424
    Dec 13, 2010
    Chicago
    The beginnings of a B horror movie ...
     
  17. Timos L

    Timos L Mu-43 Top Veteran

    718
    Dec 26, 2011
    Athens, Greece
    Timos :)
  18. nueces snapper

    nueces snapper Mu-43 All-Pro

    Great shots.

    Voracious is right. A friend of mine showed me a picture, an actual polaroid he had shot himself, of a big mantis with a small hummingbird in its 'claws' or whatever you would call them. I spose it could have been a dead hummer the mantis had found but he was holding it securely and holding it up. :eek:
     
  19. brokken

    brokken Mu-43 Regular

    66
    Aug 25, 2012
    So fascinating! Too bad we don't get too many in Cali (not like I used to see back east). And the genus is full of surprises in terms of colors and shapes - just take a look at a monster like Idolomantis diabolica: (not my picture)

    [​IMG]
     
  20. sdeban

    sdeban Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Sep 8, 2012
    Nice photos and cool animal. It might interest you to know their eyes are clusters of lenses, each with its sensors underneath. Zillions of low res cameras. When they seem to look at you, you're really just looking into the lens that's aligned with you, giving the appearance of a pupil (the pseudopupil). Pretty neat actually!