PP & different viewing devices

pasisti

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Dec 16, 2013
Messages
66
Location
Helsinki, Finland
Hi

I have a problem. I have just edited some photos from a photoshoot and on my calibrated display they look great. They look just as great on my other desktop with a crappy cheap monitor, just as they do on my phone and on my tablet. But on my TV (Sony, from the 1200$ region) they look horrendous! The problem is that we shot against an almost dark background and in PP I hid that background completely. Or so I tried. On all the other monitors except the TV, all the photos have smooth background and so on but on my TV it seems like the black levels are either 0 (completely black) or 50 (somewhat dark grey). If something is not completely black on the photo, it gets boosted up to at least 50. The numbers are imaginary, just for you to get my problem.

What should I do? It's way too much work to go through all the photos and make them look good on my TV, especially considering that they look good on everything else. I could drop the PP of the background but I really like it. The place wasn't a real photo studio so we had to work with what we got and as it was daytime we couldn't get the background completely dark.

Here is an example for you to see what I mean. On this photo the problems are where the dark background ends and the subjects highlights begin.
View attachment 382460Netti-HSA-80 by matiasloyt, on Flickr

All advices and criticism are welcome! :)
 

pasisti

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Joined
Dec 16, 2013
Messages
66
Location
Helsinki, Finland
So I shouldn't worry too much about it? The problem here is of course that I'm worrying about the end user, my clients, as I have no idea what display will they be watching it on.
 

OzRay

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Jan 29, 2010
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South Gippsland, Australia
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Ray, not Oz
Are you getting splotches in the black? The TV isn't going to be calibrated, so it'll show the results in any way that it wants. When I look at the image in Photoshop (after I save it) I can see lots of unevenness (especially around the body). If the background wasn't fully even from the outset, it's going to mean a fair bit of work to fix.
 

pasisti

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Dec 16, 2013
Messages
66
Location
Helsinki, Finland
I guess splotch could be good word for it (I'm not native). That exactly is the problem. I kind of knew this going into the photoshoot but I was hoping I could work with it. This was a "you scratch my back, I scratch your back"-kind-of photoshoot for me, and also for me to get stuff on my porfolio. I would still like to be sure to get the end quality right, both for this client and for my general workflow so I don't do stupid mistakes in the future! :)
 

pasisti

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Dec 16, 2013
Messages
66
Location
Helsinki, Finland
How noticeable do you think it will be on facebook marketing? I can't see any splotches on any other device except my TV but I'm still a bit worried about it.
 

janneman

Mu-43 Veteran
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Dec 6, 2012
Messages
433
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Netherlands
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Jan (John) Kusters
My own tv had the possibility to adjust and save one personal setting. I use that one for viewing pictures. This works fine for showing my pics to geusts, but of course it does not help when handing out dvd's with photoshows to others. If I did that more often, I would figure out a special correction for tv use and mark the dvd accordingly (like I do now for web use, computer use and printing).
 

pasisti

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Dec 16, 2013
Messages
66
Location
Helsinki, Finland
Just an update: I decided to go through the 40 photos I had already sent them (they were a group of 6 dancers) and edit them all to get rid of the splotches. It was a lot of maybe unnecessary work but at least I don't have to worry about my photos getting shown in a "bad light" as they understood that these were the final pictures and they should get rid of the previous ones. Today I decided that that was my last pro bono gig, although I did get something out of it that will benefit me monetarily in the near future.

What I learned from this gig:
1) Better skills for handling models who know how to move and pose but get mentally stuck when I ask them to modify their positions due to lighting problems etc.
2) Never promise too many photos for the price you are getting
3) If you do the same edit for lots of pictures, check it on various displays after doing the first one. Then you know where you are getting yourself into and what pitfalls to avoid.
 
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