PL 50-200 on G9 - is this normal?

EvetsF

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M43 newcomer here, moving up from Panasonic FZ1000 and FZ2500.

Just received a new G9 and PL 50-200 lens. In one of the photos I took, I'm seeing some vignetting, especially in the lower corners, at the 200mm setting. Is this normal, or should I exchange it?
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wjiang

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Unfortunately, I would say yes, it is normal for Panasonic telephotos. It's the IS working very hard, causing the imaging frame to be at the very extreme edge of the lens. I've had this with every Panasonic telephoto that I've owned - 45-175, 35-100 f/2.8 II, 100-300 II.
 

Wasabi Bob

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I've used many of their lens, and I've only seen this on very few occasions - mostly when I a had lens shade + filter(s) installed - @ widest apertures. It's not an accurate statement to say all their lens have this - not true.
 

Darmok N Jalad

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I thought that was why certain programs (like LR) offer to auto-correct based on the camera+lens? I figured the camera communicated the sensor and lens positions to the developing program and then it makes the adjustments in PP?
 

Brownie

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I shoot a lot with that combo and always with the lens hood, but have never noticed it. I'll check some RAW files when I get home.

@Darmok N Jalad is correct. Not sure about LR, but Darktable doesn't offer a correction for this lens. Might be that being open source software there aren't enough people using it that someone has submitted a profile. I would be very interested to know if LR (or any other program) has a correction for it.
 

Brownie

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This is a RAW shot SOOC except for demosaic and resizing. There is no evidence of vignetting. This was at 200mm with the hood. I messed with it after exporting to jpeg to see if I could get vignetting to show up. It's not there. I went through many shots from Saturday made with this lens throughout the entire focal range, and there is no vignetting at all.

Based on my experience, there's no evidence that vignetting is a characteristic of this lens. I would contact your dealer for an exchange.

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P1025936 by telecast, on Flickr
 

wjiang

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BTW the vignetting I'm talking about is caused by IS shifting the image out to one edge of frame during extreme motion, so would only happen if you were panning or were quite unstable (e.g. it was gusty). I've not had it happen under more steady conditions.

I should add that other than a comparatively short period with the 40-150R, all my telephotos have been Panasonics, so maybe a somewhat skewed sample.
 
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swifty

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I think wijang is correct as the distribution of vignetting is uneven.
If the lens was properly centred around the image circle the amount of vignetting would be equal on all four corners. Unevenness should indicate the IS is operating near the edge of its capabilities shifting close to the borders of the image circle in one direction.
If OP finds every shot had more vignetting on the lower edges then something is wrong.
But if during testing with IBIS and lens IS switched off, the vignetting is even and less pronounced then that should be the baseline amount of vignetting at that aperture. Anything more than that can likely be attributed to IS shifting.
 

KBeezie

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I think wijang is correct as the distribution of vignetting is uneven.
If the lens was properly centred around the image circle the amount of vignetting would be equal on all four corners. Unevenness should indicate the IS is operating near the edge of its capabilities shifting close to the borders of the image circle in one direction.
If OP finds every shot had more vignetting on the lower edges then something is wrong.
But if during testing with IBIS and lens IS switched off, the vignetting is even and less pronounced then that should be the baseline amount of vignetting at that aperture. Anything more than that can likely be attributed to IS shifting.
Also consider how bright the source of light is on top and bottom. Only way to really say if the vignetting is stronger on the bottom than the top is to shoot against a flat evenly lit surface that is the same from top to bottom. I suspect it's brighter near the top because the sky is brighter, especially since it's not a complete occlusion at the corner, but rather a vignette.

LR/ACR/etc should have lens profiles built in if this is a regular thing (and would think the camera would do the same built in if saving to a jpeg, and having the shading compensation enabled).

In regards to Olympus vs Panasonic (a bit off topic), Phocal may be surprised to know that both Olympus and Panasonic do make some subpar lens, but both also make excellent lens, there is no clear brand-to-brand comparison with all their lens line up stacked against each other. So it's rather foolish in this context to be like "Olympus > Panasonic". I shoot with a mix, and I've found on the 20mm side I prefer the first generation of the Panasonic 20/1.7, likewise I prefer the Panasonic 42.5/1.7 OIS over the Olympus 45/1.8. But I really like Olympus 12mm f/2.0 and Olympus 9mm f/8 compared to the Panasonic equivalent.
 

swifty

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Also consider how bright the source of light is on top and bottom. Only way to really say if the vignetting is stronger on the bottom than the top is to shoot against a flat evenly lit surface that is the same from top to bottom. I suspect it's brighter near the top because the sky is brighter, especially since it's not a complete occlusion at the corner, but rather a vignette.

LR/ACR/etc should have lens profiles built in if this is a regular thing (and would think the camera would do the same built in if saving to a jpeg, and having the shading compensation enabled).
Yes, some formal testing would be best. I must admit I only eyeballed the image and at glance the lower left seems worst re:vignetting.
 
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