Photoshop Lightroom vs Photoshop?

ksn

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I've seen Lightroom brought up many times but I haven't really looked into it until today. Adobe lists it as "Photoshop Lightroom", is this program a plug-in to Photoshop, a different software, or like a stripped down version of Photoshop? Can I do everything Lightroom does with Photoshop?
 

icase81

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Lightroom is standalone, and used for 'processing' images, not editing them. Adjusting exposure, color balance, that kind of thing.
 

ksn

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Lightroom is standalone, and used for 'processing' images, not editing them. Adjusting exposure, color balance, that kind of thing.
I see the noise reduction option on the site which looks effective, but other than that, I can alter photo filters, saturation, hue/color balance, and levels in photoshop as well.
 

icase81

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I see the noise reduction option on the site which looks effective, but other than that, I can alter photo filters, saturation, hue/color balance, and levels in photoshop as well.
Correct. The interface is completely different, however, and it is MUCH cheaper than Photoshop. Lightroom can be had for ~ $80 on Amazon.

There are some videos here:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003Q81EL2/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B003739DW8&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1N5RJTP0S20F8791FWRV in the images part. Check them out to get a better idea.
 

ksn

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I see, thanks. Everything looks more intuitive as well. I will have to give it a try :)
 

banana101

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Lightroom is a different program than Photoshop. I think it's mainly for tweaking images as opposed to full on manipulating them, so it really depends what you wish to do with your images. Although I quite like the addition of hdr in CS5.
 

ZephyrZ33

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I use to rely solely on Photoshop but stopped using it after installing Lightroom. The only thing I really utilize it for is to clone, layer, delete objects or create graphic art.

Thought this was interesting...

Lightroom Vs. Photoshop - Outdoor Photographer | OutdoorPhotographer.com

Article said:
Lightroom Vs. Photoshop
Which one of these programs will you find more useful for your photography?
By Rob Sheppard

Here are 10 advantages to Lightroom, and it’s important to understand that they apply to both JPEG and RAW workflows.

1 Nondestructive editing. Nothing is actually changed in an image until the photo is exported. This means you can make an adjustment, change it again and again, but no quality is lost as it would be in Photoshop.

2 Better controls over organizing your photos. Lightroom has Collections and Smart Collections, which are very helpful. Say you’re gathering a group of photos to use in a slideshow. You could put these into a Collection so you could go to them instantly at another time. The photos aren’t actually moved, so the Collections are “virtual,” meaning they need little storage space. Once you start doing this with Collections, you’ll find a lot of uses for them.

3 Large views. Lightroom has larger Compare and Survey views of images when you need to compare them for editing, compared to Bridge.

4 Quickly customizable interface. Simple keystrokes allow you to go from viewing lots of photos to a single image to an enlarged photo. Simple keystrokes also allow you to quickly change what’s shown on the interface so you can simplify it down to just the photo or only keep the panels open that you really need. You can quickly and easily make anything reappear.

5 Interface that keeps controls readily and quickly accessible. In Photoshop, everything is based on opening and closing individual adjustment windows. You can’t go instantly from Levels, for example, to Curves, which you can do in Lightroom. All Lightroom controls are kept available in panels right next to the photos.

6 Always-available History palette. When you close a Photoshop image, history is gone. It always stays with your Lightroom images.

7 Superior batch or multiple image processing. Batch processing in Photoshop is a bit of a pain. In Lightroom, simply adjust one photo of a group that you like, then tell it to synchronize those adjustments with the rest. You also can copy the adjustments from one photo to another anywhere in the Library easily.

8 Superior color control. In the HSL (hue-saturation-luminance) section of the Develop panel, you gain more colors to work with compared to Photoshop and with more precise control. This isn’t so different from Camera Raw except for a “magic button”—the Targeted Adjustment button. Click on that and you activate your cursor. Now move the cursor to the photo, click on a color, then drag the cursor up and down to change that color’s hue, saturation or luminance and no other colors (well, some colors that are mixes will be changed). To me, that’s huge—control that’s faster, easier and more effective than any other program. This can correct problem colors, as well as refine the look of the photo.

9 Nondestructive, easy local control. Local control, or adjusting small parts of a photo without affecting anything else, has long been an important part of photography. This always was a part of black-and-white photography, but it has been a problem with color. It was difficult to do with film and prints, and it takes a lot of time and experience to master such controls in Photoshop. In Lightroom 2, you can darken, lighten, affect color and change sharpness and other aspects of specific areas in the photo simply by brushing your cursor across the areas. And if you don’t like the results, just delete and try again.

10 Nondestructive cloning and healing brush. Photoshop has far more power in its Cloning and Healing Brush tools than Lightroom, but Lightroom offers simple cloning and healing that’s nondestructive. You can make a change, yet if it looks bad, you can adjust the change or even delete it.
 

ksn

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Wow, that seems really good. I do a lot of image editing, so I can't phase out Photoshop, but for photos, nondestructive and full history will be a big plus.
 

cucco

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In addition to the basic "develop" options (saturation, balance, color channels, etc.), there are also some pretty cool publishing tools too that really help to provide a good "finished product" to clients including direct publish to video, PDF and web formats with all sorts of options.

When I need to send a quick portfolio to people, I publish it through lightroom and send a PDF or movie as my digital portfolio.
 

Spuff

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Lightroom is standalone, and used for 'processing' images, not editing them. Adjusting exposure, color balance, that kind of thing.
That's true, but I managed to become legless in Lightroom quite nicely i think:

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 

ksn

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The remaining shadow is a little wonky, but I doubt anyone would notice it unless they were looking hard.
 

~tc~

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Note that Elements 9 has incorporated many of these features also.

Think the "lossless" thing is overhyped IMHO. Saving as a PED file will save the history, or simply do a "save as" for your modified version. In either case, realize the file is going to be a lot bigger.
 

kevinparis

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if you mean by 'lossless' you mean the non destructive aspect of things you get with LR and Aperture then I have to strongly disagree that its overhyped - its the single feature that transforms the way you handle your files - only one file ever to worry about - multiple versions of the same image without big extra files

K
 

Spuff

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You did that in lightroom?
Please do tell how?
Those are excellent results!
It's the wonder of 'spot removal' - it's my favourite tool. It's not designed for that, but if you make several overlapping spots then you can do that (I could have done it a bit tidier (tail got bitten in to for one thing), but it was only for a quick look photo). It helps to be surrounded by fairly uniform colour/pattern to copy, and you won't be able to do it in all contexts.
 

Chuck Pike

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LR3 a good D.A.M. system.

LR3 is really two different things. One most of us know, it is used to work on our images. The other is a DAM (digital asset management) system, or how to keep up with your pictures. It doesn't make a copy that becomes part of LR3 other than creating thumbnails, but keeps track of where your images are on one or more drives. It has many ways of doing this. One that is handy is with key words. You enter key words when you import files to your computer, and later you can call up all photos that have that same key word. Let say you entered the key words red ford truck. You do a search for red ford truck, and every red ford truck on your many hard drives will be found (only if you entered the key words as part of the file).

I bought into LR3 because I had someone want to purchase three photos to use in a publication. I found two right off, but it took me a long search to find that third image. I made a search to find an answer, and found a set of lessons on Luminous Landscape on LR as a DAM system. You down load these over the web, and they also have lessons for LR3 but the one on keeping track of the files was a great help to me. I own both sets of lessons.

One problem I had with the lessons was that it made me need to rename all my folders. I have then in years and months and it took me two weeks working about 8 hours a day 6 days a week to rename everything. But now it doesn't take much time at all to get things to where they need to be.

There are also plug in that work with LR3. One that I really like is Viveza 2 as it has U Point Technology. I really liked U Point when I was using NX2, and was one of the reasons that I didn't use my PS all that much. Then one day I decided that NX2 was just to buggy and tried the 30 day free trial from LR3 and never used NX2 or PS again.

Images for books, magazines and calendars | photosbypike
 

ksn

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Think the "lossless" thing is overhyped IMHO. Saving as a PED file will save the history, or simply do a "save as" for your modified version. In either case, realize the file is going to be a lot bigger.
I don't know about elements, but PSD files don't save history. Each time you save as JPEG, you lose picture quality unless you go lossless (PSD/TIFF). Either way, you end up with multiple files for each photo. If LR works the way it's described, you only have to deal with 1 file with your alterations as well as the original, no quality loss, all history is stored, and file sizes should remain roughly the same.
 

kevinparis

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elements may have keywords... but the asset management is not in the same class as Lightroom.... and I am an Aperture user :)

elements/photoshop are fundamentally different beasts from the new approach to working with digital photographs represented by LR and aperture.

with LR/Aperture yes you will see a higher processor hit - after all it is decoding your source file and applying the effects in realtime - thats how it does the non destructive aspect of things - your original file is NEVER changed.

there is no need to go and rename your folder structure - as you import your images you can decide where you want to put the files.

k
 
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