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Photographers Etiquette - a must read

Discussion in 'The Watering Hole' started by EricRose, Aug 21, 2015.

  1. EricRose

    EricRose Mu-43 Regular

    100
    Jul 2, 2014
    The upper 12
    Eric Rose
    I have on the rare occasion run into the types of people the author talks about. Only because I generally stay away from the usual "photo hot spots". In one instance while I was shooting a beautiful landscape in the Rockies with my 4x5 this a-hole walked right in front of me to take his own image and to top it off then came back to my camera position and proceeded to put his camera right up against mine to insure he got the same exact angle. I was dumbfounded! There were only 3 people in the entire valley, this idiot and my wife and I. I wasn't exactly silent during this but he just didn't give a crap what I thought.

    http://highsierraworkshops.org/an-o...hotographers-its-time-for-an-etiquette-check/
     
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  2. gr6825

    gr6825 Mu-43 Veteran

    277
    Oct 10, 2012
    Some common sense points in the article, but for me the author loses credibility right off the bat with the nasty "you are not special" BS.
     
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  3. Kalifornier

    Kalifornier Mu-43 Veteran

    430
    Apr 29, 2014
    California
    Having had to deal with some unpleasant 'pro' photographers at some popular sites (Delicate Arch/Grand Canyon/etc), I agree with the author. And moving objects so others won't get the same shot....that's definitely a low.
     
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  4. Jonathan F/2

    Jonathan F/2 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 10, 2011
    Los Angeles, CA
    A lot of pro photographers are anti-social jerks. Professional photography attracts all the weirdos! lol
     
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  5. budeny

    budeny Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 4, 2014
    Boulder, CO
    TBH I have little mercy for workshop groups.
     
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  6. Kalifornier

    Kalifornier Mu-43 Veteran

    430
    Apr 29, 2014
    California
    After dealing with some such jerks, my first thoughts are always "Thank God I don't have to do photography for a living because I don't want to turn into one of these guys" :)
     
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  7. Jonathan F/2

    Jonathan F/2 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 10, 2011
    Los Angeles, CA
    It's true though, it takes a certain type of thick skinned individual to make money in photography. You really need to be a hustler in the business and it's every man for him/herself!
     
  8. gryphon1911

    gryphon1911 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 13, 2014
    Central Ohio, USA
    Andrew
    I posted this over there(Petapixel), but I'll include it here if people don't want to take the time to rummage through the comments:

    This article reads like a workshop company that is pissed because they don't like what other people are doing.

    How about this - I was in a mountain region in WV a few years ago, was taking my images of a waterfall. A workshop group comes in and starts littering the place with their tripods. Screaming, yelling, hooting - being everything that the author is going on about.

    I find individual shooters less of an issue than the groups of people in workshops that feel, because they paid some other person to lead them to a place they could have found on their own, that they now have rights to do whatever they want in the location.

    I actually find this author even more arrogant than most - claiming that someones image is "not better, just different". How the hell are they going to know what someones image looks like unless they have seen them all? Not to mention that "better" and "different" are subjective terms.

    There are always going to be stupid people doing stupid things, it's a fact of life. If you want people to be better to one another, you need to look deeper into the societal issues.

    I understand being upset and venting, but this is just a waste of an article, to be honest - rehashing past stories we have all heard before.

    Another slow news day on Petapixel, I guess.....
     
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  9. Tilman Paulin

    Tilman Paulin Mu-43 Veteran

    329
    Jun 10, 2013
    Dublin, Ireland
    I guess a lot of this comes down to why you're taking photographs of nature scenes.
    Because you're loving nature?
    or because you're hunting "trophy shots"...?

    No matter how many "Please stay on the trail and don't trample down the wildflowers" signs they put up, if there's no respect for nature, people will always put their own imaginary needs and their wants above everything else...


    P.S. Agree with Andrew, the article sounds a lot like "How dare you ruin my shot!" rather than "Please have more respect for nature"
    Not a fan of the author's aggressive tone either...
     
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  10. tyrphoto

    tyrphoto Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 25, 2014
    Seoul | NYC
    ㅇtㅈyㅅr
    While I agree with some of the points the author makes, the general tone of the article is so patronizing that at the end of reading it, I actually had a disdain for the author just like I have with the very ones that he criticizes.
     
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  11. dornblaser

    dornblaser Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 13, 2012
    Chicago-area
    David Dornblaser
    Looking at his website he seems to specialize in workshops that trek to iconic and very popular photographic destinations. Perhaps if did not take his students to the same location that everyone else visits to take pictures he would not have issues?
     
  12. Tilman Paulin

    Tilman Paulin Mu-43 Veteran

    329
    Jun 10, 2013
    Dublin, Ireland
    Guess ultimately this is an "advertorial" then... drawing traffic and attention to their courses.
    Their call to action "Share this with everyone... Let's make it count!" is a nice touch... ...
     
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  13. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    I think the article is a little dumb, honestly. The author talks about all of these examples which are exactly the type of place where these types of photographers show up - over-photographed, hackneyed, cross-off-the-list places for egotistical guys who want their portfolios to check all the boxes. If you want a scene to yourself, for gosh sakes, find a unique scene to photograph. Leave the vultures to the carcasses. If you've seen one of those sunset shots in the racetrack valley spot, you've seen them all.
     
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  14. Aushiker

    Aushiker Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 12, 2014
    Fremantle, Western Australia
    Andrew
    Actually what he wrote was:

    I hate to break it to you. Your photo that you strived so hard to get, seeing where everyone else was set-up and where you could get closer, albeit in their angle of view; breaking branches as you bushwhacked your way up the mountain; trying to copy that one photo you saw one time on Flickr, a post-processed, over-saturated photo that got tons of ‘oohs’ and ‘aahs’; ignoring the cries and pleas from other photographers that you were in their shot or ruining their shot …

    Well, that didn’t make your picture unique or better. It just was different than everyone else. And different certainly doesn’t mean good.


    And that ‘different’ was at the sacrifice of all the other photographers you screwed over.

    For what it is worth I found the article informative and I appreciate it being shared, so thanks to @EricRose@EricRose for doing so.

    Andrew
     
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  15. PeeBee

    PeeBee Mu-43 Top Veteran

    660
    Sep 17, 2012
    UK
    I agree. I took my wheelchair bound buddy to a photography convention a few years ago and we gave up trying to watch any of the presentations due to the number of inconsiderate numbskulls that pushed themselves and their 'look how big my lens is' rig in front of us.

    That said, I think an amount of assertiveness is required to be successful at photography.
     
  16. tyrphoto

    tyrphoto Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 25, 2014
    Seoul | NYC
    ㅇtㅈyㅅr
    Same could be said for a lot of other professions and industries. Sales, finance, marketing, art, food, fashion/textiles, music, acting, etc... Although I don't think being assertive, a hustler or being thick skinned necessarily makes one a jerk or that to be successful you need to be an a-hole.

     
  17. PeeBee

    PeeBee Mu-43 Top Veteran

    660
    Sep 17, 2012
    UK
    True, but they are qualities that often go hand in hand.
     
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  18. dornblaser

    dornblaser Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 13, 2012
    Chicago-area
    David Dornblaser
    I disagree. The bigger the playing field, the more successful the individual, I think you will more likely find that person to be civil, choose his/her words carefully, and is likely to be a nice person at heart. I think that you are more likely to find the ego and blatant self-promotion to be found in niche professions or avocations.
     
  19. Lcrunyon

    Lcrunyon Mu-43 Top Veteran

    758
    Jun 4, 2014
    Maryland
    Loren
    There are plenty of oblivious jerks around, professional photographer or otherwise.

    I agree with the author's points about respect for nature and keeping it pristine, and also about showing awareness and respect for people around you. But I also agree that his tone didn't do his argument any favors. For example, I can imagine that in a few of those experiences he relayed, the culprit may have had no idea that a group was going to come along later and set up behind them somewhere. Is that person then supposed to immediately relinquish the spot to them? Perhaps some of these examples were two-way streets.
     
  20. PeeBee

    PeeBee Mu-43 Top Veteran

    660
    Sep 17, 2012
    UK
    There are many ways to aspire to 'success' and yes, that is one path, but unfortunately not everyone takes the ethical or considerate route.